Atmospheric Aging Processes

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Aerosols".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (17 February 2023) | Viewed by 6465

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Geoscience and Surveying Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing), Beijing 100083, China
Interests: atmospheric environment; environmental geochemistry; mineralogy, geo-health; coal geology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Institute for Environmental and Climate Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 511443, China
Interests: secondary aerosol formation; mixing state; chemical composition; phase state; effective density; hygroscopicity; shape
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Atmospheric particles are derived from primary emissions and secondary chemical reaction, which can influence the climate, air quality, human health, and global geochemical cycling. The effects of aerosol particles change with their chemical and physical properties, such as chemical composition, phase state, effective density, and morphologies. It is worth noting that atmospheric processes can not only form secondary aerosols but also alter the physicochemical properties of primary particles, which highlights their importance in atmospheric science. Although advanced techniques have recently been developed to focus on the atmospheric evolution of particles, there are still multitudinous complex issues that need to be resolved. Therefore, atmospheric science needs new and insightful studies to better understand the evolution of particles via theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, and field observations.

In this Special Issue, we call for research and review articles focused on atmospheric processes. In particular, the following topics are very welcome:

  • Studies focused on the development of instruments and techniques for improving the accurate characterization of atmospheric processes;
  • Studies for the mechanisms of the formation of secondary inorganic and organic aerosols;
  • Studies measuring the change of aerosol physicochemical properties of mixing state, chemical composition, phase state, effective density, hygroscopicity, and shape during the atmospheric processes;
  • Particle toxicity in association with the atmospheric ageing process;
  • Impacts of the atmospheric ageing process on global geochemical cycling.

Prof. Dr. Longyi Shao
Dr. Long Peng
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • technique
  • secondary aerosol formation
  • mixing state
  • chemical composition
  • phase state
  • effective density

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 5086 KiB  
Article
Simulating Atmospheric Organic Aerosol in the Boreal Forest Using Its Volatility-Oxygen Content Distribution
by Eleni Karnezi, Liine Heikkinen, Markku Kulmala and Spyros N. Pandis
Atmosphere 2023, 14(5), 763; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos14050763 - 22 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1175
Abstract
Various parameterizations of organic aerosol (OA) formation and its subsequent evolution in the two-dimensional Volatility Basis Set (2D-VBS) framework are evaluated using ground measurements collected in the 2013 PEGASOS field campaign in the boreal forest station of Hyytiälä in southern Finland. A number [...] Read more.
Various parameterizations of organic aerosol (OA) formation and its subsequent evolution in the two-dimensional Volatility Basis Set (2D-VBS) framework are evaluated using ground measurements collected in the 2013 PEGASOS field campaign in the boreal forest station of Hyytiälä in southern Finland. A number of chemical aging schemes that performed well in the polluted environment of the Po Valley in Italy during the PEGASOS 2012 campaign are examined, taking into account various functionalization and fragmentation pathways for biogenic and anthropogenic OA components. All seven aging schemes considered have satisfactory results, consistent with the ground measurements. Despite their differences, these schemes predict similar contributions of the various OA sources and formation pathways for the periods examined. The highest contribution comes from biogenic secondary OA (bSOA), as expected, contributing 40–63% depending on the modeling scheme. Anthropogenic secondary OA (aSOA) is predicted to contribute 11–18% of the total OA, while SOA from intermediate-volatility compounds (SOA-iv) oxidation contributes another 18–27%. The fresh primary OA (POA) contributes 4%, while the SOA resulting from the oxidation of the evaporated semivolatile POA (SOA-sv) varies between 4 and 6%. Finally, 5–6% is predicted to be due to long-range transport from outside the modeling domain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Aging Processes)
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10 pages, 1790 KiB  
Article
Theoretical Foundation of the Relationship between Three Definitions of Effective Density and Particle Size
by Long Peng and Yonglin Liu
Atmosphere 2022, 13(4), 564; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13040564 - 31 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1788
Abstract
Effective density (ρe) is universally used in atmospheric science as an alternative measure of the density (ρ) of aerosol particles, and its definitions can be expressed in terms of the particle mass (mp), ρ, [...] Read more.
Effective density (ρe) is universally used in atmospheric science as an alternative measure of the density (ρ) of aerosol particles, and its definitions can be expressed in terms of the particle mass (mp), ρ, mobility diameter (Dm), vacuum aerodynamic diameter (Dva), and dynamic shape factor (χ), as ρeI = 6mp/(πDm3), ρeII = ρ/χ, and ρeIII = Dva/Dm. However, the theoretical foundation of these three definitions of ρe is still poorly understood before their application. Here, we explore the relationship between ρe and aerosol size through theoretical calculation. This study finds, for the first time, that ρeI and ρeIII inherently decrease with increasing size for aspherical particles with a fixed ρ and χ. We further elucidate that these inherent decreasing tendencies are governed by χ, and the ratio of the Cunningham Slip Correction Factor of the volume-equivalent diameter to that of the mobility diameter (Cc(Dve)/Cc(Dm)), but not by ρ. Taking the variable χ into consideration, the relationships of ρeI and ρeIII to particle size become more complicated, which suggests that the values of ρeI and ρeIII have little indication of the size-resolved physicochemical properties of particles. On the contrary, ρeII is independent on size for fixed χ and ρ, which indicates that the change in ρeII with size can better indicate the change in morphology and the transformation of the chemical compositions of particles. Our new insights into the essence of three ρes provide an accurate and crucial theoretical foundation for their application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Aging Processes)
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Review

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24 pages, 4134 KiB  
Review
Research Progress on Heterogeneous Reactions of Pollutant Gases on the Surface of Atmospheric Mineral Particulate Matter in China
by Fei Zheng, Faqin Dong, Lin Zhou, Yunzhu Chen, Jieyu Yu, Xijie Luo, Xingyu Zhang, Zhenzhen Lv, Xue Xia and Jingyuan Xue
Atmosphere 2022, 13(8), 1283; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13081283 - 12 Aug 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2270
Abstract
Haze is the phenomenon of visibility degradation caused by extinction effects related to the physicochemical properties of atmospheric particulate matter (APM). Atmosphere heterogeneous reactions can alter the physicochemical properties of APM. Therefore, it is important to understand the atmospheric heterogeneous reactions of APM [...] Read more.
Haze is the phenomenon of visibility degradation caused by extinction effects related to the physicochemical properties of atmospheric particulate matter (APM). Atmosphere heterogeneous reactions can alter the physicochemical properties of APM. Therefore, it is important to understand the atmospheric heterogeneous reactions of APM in order to reveal the cause of haze. Herein, the current situation, developmental trend, source, and composition of APM pollution in China are reviewed. Additionally, we introduce the reaction characteristics and key chemical processes of common inorganic, organic, and mixed pollutant gases on the surface of mineral particles. The effects of mineral particulate matter on aggregation, regulation, and catalysis in the formation of atmospheric aerosols and the synergistic reaction mechanism of SO2, NO2, O3, and VOCs on the surfaces of different mineral particles are summarized. The problems existing in the current research on heterogeneous reactions on the surfaces of mineral particles are also evaluated. This paper aims to gain a deep understanding of the mechanism of mineral particulate matter promoting the formation of secondary aerosols and attempts to provide theoretical support for effective haze control. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atmospheric Aging Processes)
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