Transport Emissions and Their Environmental Impacts

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Air Quality".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2499

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China
Interests: ship emissions; air quality modelling; atmospheric transport; biogeochemical cycle
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Guest Editor
Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon, 21502 Geesthacht, Germany
Interests: shipping emissions; chemistry transport modeling; aerosols; emission modeling
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Guest Editor
IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, 11428 Gothenburg, Sweden
Interests: shipping emissions; atmospheric chemistry; chemistry transport modeling; ship exhaust characterisation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Emissions from transport are an important global source of air pollutants and greenhouse gases. Road traffic, ship traffic and air traffic are continuously increasing. Efficiency gains and further-developed exhaust gas cleaning systems lead to decreasing emissions in some parts of the world; however, in other areas transport emissions are still increasing. This contributes to severe air pollution problems as well as to the eutrophication and acidification of marine and terrestrial ecosystems. At the same time, new fuels with much lower climate impact are being developed and tested. These may occur in unison with large changes in atmospheric emissions and atmospheric composition and possibly with new emerging air pollutants.

This Special Issue is associated with the joint international scientific conference on Transport and Air Pollution and Shipping and the Environment. It aims to promote scientific and technical communications in the fields of transport emissions and related atmospheric processes. Original results with respect to the quantification and modelling of transport emissions, modeling of air pollution and its impacts, field and laboratory observations and review papers related to transport emissions are all welcome contributions.

Topics of interest for this Special Issue include but are not limited to:

  • Transport emission inventories (road, ship, rail, aviation and mobile machinery) and estimation methodologies;
  • Monitoring techniques for transport emissions;
  • Impacts of transport emissions on air quality and atmospheric chemistry at the local to global scales;
  • Interactions of transport emissions with other sector sources;
  • Impacts of transport emissions on human health, marine and terrestrial ecosystems and climate change;
  • Comprehensive impacts of policies for transport emission reductions, particularly regarding new fuels and greenhouse gas reductions.

Prof. Dr. Yan Zhang
Dr. Volker Matthias
Dr. Jana Moldanova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • road emissions
  • non-road emissions (shipping, aviation, railroad, working machinery)
  • emission abatement technologies
  • alternative fuels
  • emission inventory
  • air quality
  • climate impacts
  • ecosystem effects
  • trace elements
  • human health
  • sustainable emission scenarios
  • multimodal transport studies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 5756 KiB  
Article
Measurement and Analysis of Brake and Tyre Particle Emissions from Automotive Series Components for High-Load Driving Tests on a Wheel and Suspension Test Bed
by Martin Kupper, Ludwig Schubert, Manfred Nachtnebel, Hartmuth Schröttner, Michael Peter Huber, Peter Fischer and Alexander Bergmann
Atmosphere 2024, 15(4), 430; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15040430 - 29 Mar 2024
Viewed by 674
Abstract
A current challenge in realising clean road transport is non-exhaust emissions. Important advances regarding measurement systems, including well-defined characterisation techniques, as well as regulation, will be made in the next few years. In this work, we present the detailed results of particle emission [...] Read more.
A current challenge in realising clean road transport is non-exhaust emissions. Important advances regarding measurement systems, including well-defined characterisation techniques, as well as regulation, will be made in the next few years. In this work, we present the detailed results of particle emission analyses, consisting of aerosol (size distribution, particle number (PN), and mass (PM)) and electron microscopy (EM) measurements, under different load conditions on a test bed for a wheel suspension and brakes. Standard tyres and brakes from serial production were tested with a high-load driving cycle, while particle measurements were conducted by gravimetric measurements and with a TSI SMPS, a TSI APS, and a GRIMM OPS. Furthermore, samples were analysed by electron microscopy. A bimodal particle size distribution (PSD) was obtained with an SMPS, with peaks at 20 nm and around 400 nm. The results of an EM analysis of >1400 single particles from the electrostatic sampler match the PSD results. The EM analysis also showed ultrafine particles, mainly containing O, Fe, Si, Ba, Mg, and S, and also fractal particles with high-C fractions. Our results suggest, in agreement with the previously published literature, that particulate emissions are related to the brake disc temperature and occur in significant amounts above a threshold temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transport Emissions and Their Environmental Impacts)
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18 pages, 4348 KiB  
Article
Application of CFD Modelling for Pollutant Dispersion at an Urban Traffic Hotspot
by Giannis Ioannidis, Chaofan Li, Paul Tremper, Till Riedel and Leonidas Ntziachristos
Atmosphere 2024, 15(1), 113; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15010113 - 18 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1354
Abstract
Health factors concerning the well-being of the urban population urge us to better comprehend the impact of emissions in urban environments on the micro-scale. There is great necessity to depict and monitor pollutant concentrations with high precision in cities, by constructing an accurate [...] Read more.
Health factors concerning the well-being of the urban population urge us to better comprehend the impact of emissions in urban environments on the micro-scale. There is great necessity to depict and monitor pollutant concentrations with high precision in cities, by constructing an accurate and validated digital air quality network. This work concerns the development and application of a CFD model for the dispersion of particulate matter, CO, and NOx from traffic activity in a highly busy area of the city of Augsburg, Germany. Emissions were calculated based on traffic activity during September of 2018 with COPERT Street software version 2.4. The needed meteorological data for the simulations were taken from a sensor’s network and the resulting concentrations were compared and validated with high-precision air quality station indications. The model’s solver used the steady-state RANS approach to resolve the velocity field and the convection–diffusion equation to simulate the pollutant’s dispersion, each one modelled with different molecular diffusion coefficients. A sensitivity analysis was performed to decide the most efficient computational mesh to be used in the modelling. A velocity profile for the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) was implemented into the inlet boundary of each simulation. The cases concerned applications on the street level in steady-state conditions for one hour. The results were evaluated based on CFD validation metrics for urban applications. This approach provides a comprehensive state-of-the-art 3D digital pollution network for the area, capable of assessing contamination levels at the street scale, providing information for pollution reduction techniques in urban areas, and combining with existing sensor networks for a more thorough portrait of air quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transport Emissions and Their Environmental Impacts)
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