applsci-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

BioMEMS

A topical collection in Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This collection belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Viewed by 6830

Editor


E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Debiotech SA, Microsystems Department, Lausanne, Switzerland
Interests: medical devices; MEMS‬; microfluidics; insulin micropumps; implantable pumps; passive flow control valves; hydrocephalus shunts; microneedles; wearable bolus injectors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

BioMEMS, in its wider acceptance, refers to any biomedical device that is partly or fully made using any microfabrication process and which therefore has at least one micrometric or submicrometric feature. Examples of bioMEMS devices include micropumps, lab-on-a-chip, organ-on-a-chip, DNA microarray, chemical sensor array, retina array, neuroMEMS, cell chips, etc.

The introduction of Clearblue, a paper-based pregnancy test, in the 1980s and, more importantly, the development of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) by George Whitesides’s group in the 1990s, which became the material of choice for rapid prototyping of microdevices for use with biological samples, gave a major boost to bioMEMS research. Today, the BioMEMS market continues to grow at an accelerated rate due to the increasing demand for homecare devices, in vitro diagnostics, and other wearable and implantable analytical systems.

In the biomedical field, miniaturized devices offer many advantages over conventional methods, including, among others, improved mass transfer and heat exchange, precise control of mixing, small sample size and reagent use, greater reliability and sensitivity, and lower manufacturing costs.

This Topical Collection covers research in diagnostic and therapeutic applications of bioMEMS and explores the design, characterization, modeling, and integration of microdevices with DNA, cells, and tissues.

text

Researchers are invited to submit original research papers, review articles, and short communications covering all aspects of bioMEMS, including but not limited to recent developments in the following areas:

  • MEMS/NEMS for biomedical applications;
  • Microfluidics and electrokinetics;
  • Drug delivery devices;
  • Wearable devices, implantable devices;
  • Cell chips, cell-related studies;
  • Organ-on-a-chip, Tissue microengineering;
  • DNA amplification and detection;
  • Diagnostics, physiological monitoring;
  • Biosensors, bioelectronics;
  • Wireless sensors, RF safety;
  • Microactuators, micro-robots;
  • Biocompatible materials, packaging.

We particularly encourage researchers to address and discuss the technical challenges associated with the development, manufacture, and testing of the different parts (actuators, sensors, materials, packaging, etc.) of bioMEMS devices.

Dr. Eric Chappel
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioMEMS
  • drug delivery
  • diagnostics
  • cells
  • DNA
  • organs and tissues

Published Papers (4 papers)

2024

Jump to: 2023, 2022

13 pages, 5613 KiB  
Article
Effects of Amyloid Beta (Aβ) Oligomers on Blood–Brain Barrier Using a 3D Microfluidic Vasculature-on-a-Chip Model
by Samuel Chidiebere Uzoechi, Boyce Edwin Collins, Cody Joseph Badeaux, Yan Li, Sang Su Kwak, Doo Yeon Kim, Daniel Todd Laskowitz, Jin-Moo Lee and Yeoheung Yun
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(9), 3917; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14093917 - 4 May 2024
Viewed by 581
Abstract
The disruption of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is largely influenced by amyloid beta (Aβ). In this study, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic BBB model devoid of a physical membrane, featuring endothelial cells interacting with an extracellular matrix (ECM). This [...] Read more.
The disruption of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is largely influenced by amyloid beta (Aβ). In this study, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic BBB model devoid of a physical membrane, featuring endothelial cells interacting with an extracellular matrix (ECM). This paper focuses on the impact of varying concentrations of Aβ1–42 oligomers on BBB dysfunction by treating them in the luminal. Our findings reveal a pronounced accumulation of Aβ1–42 oligomers at the BBB, resulting in the disruption of tight junctions and subsequent leakage evidenced by a barrier integrity assay. Additionally, cytotoxicity assessments indicate a concentration-dependent increase in cell death in response to Aβ1–42 oligomers (LC50 ~ 1 µM). This study underscores the utility of our membrane-free vascular chip in elucidating the dysfunction induced by Aβ with respect to the BBB. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

2023

Jump to: 2024, 2022

7 pages, 553 KiB  
Communication
Ct Value from RT-qPCR Can Predict SARS-CoV-2 Virus Assembly and Lineage Assignment Success
by Dominik Hadzega, Klaudia Babisová, Michaela Hyblová, Nikola Janostiaková, Peter Sabaka, Pavol Janega and Gabriel Minarik
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(18), 10431; https://doi.org/10.3390/app131810431 - 18 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 766
Abstract
During the recent pandemics of COVID-19, sequencing technics became a powerful tool for gaining information about the SARS-CoV-2 virus and using this knowledge to our advantage. Thanks to this advantage, scientists all over the world were able to search for emerging variations, watching [...] Read more.
During the recent pandemics of COVID-19, sequencing technics became a powerful tool for gaining information about the SARS-CoV-2 virus and using this knowledge to our advantage. Thanks to this advantage, scientists all over the world were able to search for emerging variations, watching the virus evolve in real time. Assembly of the virus genomes is a crucial part of obtaining this kind of useful information. In our study, we sequenced 79 samples from nasopharyngeal swabs of COVID-19 patients. Positivity to disease was evaluated using RT-qPCR. In this work, we described the relationship between RT-qPCR Ct value and genome construction success (plus genome lineage assignment). The specific value of this study is that this relationship was described for data from metatranscriptomic sequencing of human tissue, while there was no step of viral RNA isolation (usual for genome assembly procedure). RT-qPCR Ct value and assembly quality metric NG50 were correlated. We observed that the RT-qPCR Ct value threshold of the certain success of genome assembly (Ct value < 25) and certain failure (Ct value > 30) could be drawn, while results varied for values between (with completed, completed with lower quality, and failed assemblies). Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 3517 KiB  
Article
Spontaneous Epileptic Recordings from hiPSC-Derived Cortical Neurons Cultured with a Human Epileptic Brain Biopsy on a Multi Electrode Array
by Michel H. Y. Hu, Jean-Philippe Frimat, Kim Rijkers, Olaf E. M. G. Schijns, Arn M. J. M. van den Maagdenberg, Jim T. A. Dings, Regina Luttge and Govert Hoogland
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(3), 1432; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13031432 - 21 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2809
Abstract
A growing societal awareness is calling upon scientists to reconsider the use of animals in research, which stimulates the development of translational in vitro models. The physiological and architectural interactions between different cell types within an organ present a challenge to these models, [...] Read more.
A growing societal awareness is calling upon scientists to reconsider the use of animals in research, which stimulates the development of translational in vitro models. The physiological and architectural interactions between different cell types within an organ present a challenge to these models, particularly for a complex organ such as the brain. Thus far, in vitro brain models mostly consist of a single cell type and demonstrate little predictive value. Here, we present a co-culture of an epileptic human neocortical biopsy on a layer of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cortical neurons. The activity of the cortical neurons was recorded by a 120-electrode multi-electrode array. Recordings were obtained at 0, 3, and 6 days after assembly and compared to those obtained from cortical neurons without a biopsy. On all three recording days, the hybrid model displayed a firing rate, burst behavior, number of isolated spikes, inter-spike interval, and network bursting pattern that aligns with the characteristics of an epileptic network as reported by others. Thus, this novel model may be a non-animal, translational alternative for testing new therapies up to six days after resection. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

2022

Jump to: 2024, 2023

23 pages, 8806 KiB  
Article
Dry Test Methods for Micropumps
by Eric Chappel
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(23), 12258; https://doi.org/10.3390/app122312258 - 30 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1188
Abstract
The test in the production of microfluidic devices dedicated to medical applications poses several challenges in terms of contamination, reliability, and cost. The present article describes the Design-for-Testability approach used to make an insulin MEMS micropump that can be fully tested in production [...] Read more.
The test in the production of microfluidic devices dedicated to medical applications poses several challenges in terms of contamination, reliability, and cost. The present article describes the Design-for-Testability approach used to make an insulin MEMS micropump that can be fully tested in production in a few seconds. Each key functional parameter of a positive displacement micropump with check valves is described together with detailed pneumatic test methods. The typical failure modes of the device are considered and tested experimentally to show that these methods can also be used for failure analysis and process control. A simplified Built-In-Self-Test is also presented. Finally, advanced methods to characterize the piezoelectric actuator are also described and tested. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop