Advanced Thermal Analysis and Techniques in High-Fat Food Products

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 February 2024) | Viewed by 7835

Special Issue Editor

Institute of Food Sciences, Department of Chemistry, University of Life Sciences - SGGW, 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: food thermal analysis; differential scanning calorimetry; thermogravimetry analysis; pressure differential scanning calorimetry; edible fats; chocolate; food powders
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The quality of fat in food products determines its suitability for consumption. Fat is a food component that goes rancid relatively quickly, mainly to its sensitivity to high temperature, high humidity and light radiation. High-fat food products include a wide range of varied products, such as chocolate or canned meat. A very important aspect in food analysis is the study of fats in products using thermal techniques. Using these techniques, it is possible to research not only the fat itself but also the products that contain it. Thermal techniques are dynamically developing research methods, including DSC, PDSC, DTMA, TGA and many others. A Special Issue of Advanced Thermal Analysis and Techniques in High-Fat Food Products is dedicated to these techniques. Suggested research problems include but are not limited to the following topics:

  • Thermophysical and thermochemical parameters of edible fats and oils (Cp; DH; tz);
  • Indication of time of lipids oxidation by PDSC method (isothermal conditions);
  • Evaluation of antioxidants added to lipids;
  • Identification and indication of lipids adulteration;
  • Polymorphism and modification of lipids;
  • Ignition temperature of heated lipids (PDSC method);
  • Thermogravimetric analysis of high-fat food products;
  • Heat capacity.

Prof. Dr. Ewa Ostrowska-Ligȩza
Guest Editor

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 902 KiB  
Article
Concept of Batch and Fed-Batch Cultures of Yarrowia lipolytica as a Valuable Source of Sterols with Simultaneous Valorization of Molasses and Post-Frying Rapeseed Oil
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(24), 12877; https://doi.org/10.3390/app122412877 - 15 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1455
Abstract
Food byproduct streams can potentially be transformed into value-added products such as microbial lipids in bioprocesses based on the non-conventional Yarrowia yeast. The effect of culture conditions of Y. lipolytica KKP 379 wild strain in waste media on the efficiency of lipid accumulation, [...] Read more.
Food byproduct streams can potentially be transformed into value-added products such as microbial lipids in bioprocesses based on the non-conventional Yarrowia yeast. The effect of culture conditions of Y. lipolytica KKP 379 wild strain in waste media on the efficiency of lipid accumulation, fatty acid composition, presence of selected sterols, yield and elemental composition of biomass has been studied. Batch and fed-batch bioreactor cultures were carried out in media with molasses hydrolysate (MH) and post-frying rapeseed oil. It was determined that biomass grown in MH contained more minerals than in medium with rapeseed post-frying oil. Considering the PDSC study, the Tmax of oxidation induction ranged from 10.04–26.36 min for the analyzed samples. The biomass from fed-batch cultures with MH had the highest total sterol content (68.40 mg/goil), dominated by ergosterol at 60.16 mg/g. Feeding with post-frying rapeseed oil with new doses of mineral medium promoted maintaining the cellular lipid content at a high level (30.75–31.73%) for 50 h, with maximum yield at 37.50%. The results of the experiment showed that the cellular lipid accumulation efficiency of Y. lipolytica yeast and the content of sterols in the cell membrane can be manipulated by selecting waste substrates and culture mode. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Thermal Analysis and Techniques in High-Fat Food Products)
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13 pages, 660 KiB  
Article
Potential Application of Hydrocolloid-Based Oleogel and Beeswax Oleogel as Partial Substitutes of Solid Fat in Margarine
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(23), 12136; https://doi.org/10.3390/app122312136 - 27 Nov 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1899
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to produce margarine with reduced trans and saturated fatty acid contents using 10% beeswax oleogel and hydrocolloid-based oleogel containing 3.15% sodium caseinate, 0.5% guar gum, and 0.22% xanthan gum with a melting point, rheological and textural characteristics [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to produce margarine with reduced trans and saturated fatty acid contents using 10% beeswax oleogel and hydrocolloid-based oleogel containing 3.15% sodium caseinate, 0.5% guar gum, and 0.22% xanthan gum with a melting point, rheological and textural characteristics similar to palm oil. Oleogel samples were used as a substitute for palm oil and partially hydrogenated palm olein oil. Margarine (70% fat) formulated with these oleogels was investigated for solid fat content (SFC), melting point, and rheological and textural properties. The results showed that the replacement of 100% partially hydrogenated palm olein oil (PHPO) and 25% palm oil (PO) with beeswax oleogel and the replacement of 100% PHPO with hydrocolloid-based oleogel resulted in the production of margarine with rheological and textural properties similar to the commercial control margarine. In addition, these samples had a lower content of SFC and a higher melting point than the commercial control sample. The amounts of saturated and trans fatty acids also decreased. These were 28% and 80% in the sample containing beeswax and 15% and 73% in the sample with hydrocolloid-based oleogels for saturated and trans fatty acids, respectively. It was concluded that it is possible to manufacture margarine using the oleogel method while maintaining its physical characteristics and improving its nutritional properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Thermal Analysis and Techniques in High-Fat Food Products)
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14 pages, 1228 KiB  
Article
Quality Evaluation of Plant Oil Blends Interesterified by Using Immobilized Rhizomucor miehei Lipase
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(21), 11148; https://doi.org/10.3390/app122111148 - 03 Nov 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1217
Abstract
The aim of this research was to evaluate the quality and oxidative stability of enzymatically interesterified plant oil blends. The model plant oil blends consisted of tomato seed oil and coconut oil, which were applied to enzymatic interesterification in the presence of a [...] Read more.
The aim of this research was to evaluate the quality and oxidative stability of enzymatically interesterified plant oil blends. The model plant oil blends consisted of tomato seed oil and coconut oil, which were applied to enzymatic interesterification in the presence of a microbial lipase. To obtain quality characteristics of the enzymatically interesterified oil blends, the following analyses were performed: fatty acids composition and their distribution in internal position (sn-2) in triacylglycerols, oxidative induction time, melting profile, acid value (AV), and peroxide value (PV). The analyzed oil blends contain 6 to 25% monounsaturated fatty acids and 16 to 42% polyunsaturated fatty acids. Additionally, it was noticed that the major monounsaturated fatty acid was oleic acid, with its contribution ranging from 9 to 19%. In most cases, oleic and linoleic acids occupied the sn-2 position of the triacylglycerol molecules, with their contribution reaching 35 to 72% and 34 to 71%, respectively. The enzymatically interesterified oil mixtures were characterized by a relatively long oxidation induction time (41–87 min). Melting profiles of the tested samples revealed the presence of a diversified number of endothermic peaks. The AV and PV of the tested oil blends exceeded 10 mg KOH g−1 fat and 1 meq O2 kg−1 fat, respectively. In conclusion, the tested interesterified plant oil blends are characterized by acceptable thermal and oxidative stability and fatty acid profile. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Thermal Analysis and Techniques in High-Fat Food Products)
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17 pages, 609 KiB  
Article
Oxidative Stability Analysis of Selected Oils from Unconventional Raw Materials Using Rancimat Apparatus
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(20), 10355; https://doi.org/10.3390/app122010355 - 14 Oct 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2649
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the quality of selected oils from the seeds of herbs and vegetables (basil, fenugreek, coriander, tomato, garden cress, parsley, and dill), especially their oxidative stability. The oils were tested for oxidation degree (acid value, peroxide value, p-anisidine [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the quality of selected oils from the seeds of herbs and vegetables (basil, fenugreek, coriander, tomato, garden cress, parsley, and dill), especially their oxidative stability. The oils were tested for oxidation degree (acid value, peroxide value, p-anisidine value, TOTOX indicator, and specific extinction under ultraviolet light), colours, content of carotenoid and chlorophyll pigments, fatty acid composition, indicators of lipid nutritional quality, oxidative stability, and oxidation kinetics parameters (Rancimat). Principal component analysis was applied to identify a correlation between the oils’ quality parameters. The results of the fatty acid compositions show that basil oil was a good source of omega-3 fatty acids. Coriander seed oil was found to be the most resistant to oxidation, containing mainly monounsaturated fatty acids. The highest value of activation energy was calculated for fenugreek oil (94.18 kJ/mol), and the lowest was for dill seed oil (72.61 kJ/mol). However, basil oil was characterised by the highest constant reaction rate at 120 °C—3.0679 h−1. The colour determined by the L* parameter and the calculated oxidizability value had the most significant influence on the oxidation stability of the oils, and the correlation coefficients were r = −0.88 and 0.87, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Thermal Analysis and Techniques in High-Fat Food Products)
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