Sports Injuries and Physical Rehabilitation

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2024 | Viewed by 2421

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Sports, Health and Rehabilitation, Kookmin University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Interests: soft tissue injuries; inflammation; oxidative stress

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Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea
Interests: sports medicine; sports rehabilitation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Participation in sports is common not only for professional athletes but also for the general population for health purposes. However, sports injuries that accompany participation in sports are also common. It is important to treat and rehabilitate patients after an injury has occurred, but it may be more important to prevent an injury from occurring. Because sports injuries occur in various tissues and various sports, it is difficult to integrate them and properly explain them to the general public as well as experts in the field. In addition, there is a large gap between experts who directly deal with injuries in the field and those who theoretically study injuries. The purpose of this Special Issue is to combine the practical viewpoints of experts in the field working on sports medicine teams with the knowledge obtained through research on the mechanisms of sports injuries.

Dr. Joohyung Lee
Prof. Dr. Sae Yong Lee
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • practical aspect of sports injuries
  • mechanisms of sports injuries
  • integration of practice and theory

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1391 KiB  
Article
Muscle Injuries in Elite Youth Football Academy: A Six-Year Longitudinal Study on the U15 Football Team
by Jaksa Skomrlj, Toni Modric, Damir Sekulic, Ognjen Uljevic, Marijana Geets Kesic, Ante Bandalovic, Ante Turic, Boris Becir and Sime Versic
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(11), 4422; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14114422 - 23 May 2024
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Abstract
To develop specific preventive strategies, it is necessary to investigate in detail the occurrence of injuries in young football players. This study aimed to provide details about the type, location, severity, and contact nature of muscle injuries in elite U15 Croatian football players. [...] Read more.
To develop specific preventive strategies, it is necessary to investigate in detail the occurrence of injuries in young football players. This study aimed to provide details about the type, location, severity, and contact nature of muscle injuries in elite U15 Croatian football players. A total number of 130 muscle injuries occurred during the six competitive seasons, of which 88 were DOMS injuries and 42 were rupture injuries. Specifically, 87% of all muscle injuries belonged to the four major groups, with only 15 injuries to the other muscle groups: hamstrings (43), quadriceps (41), adductors (25), calves (6). The muscle injury incidence was stable during the observed period as the injury incidence rate ratio (IRR) was 1.01 (95%CI: 0.99–1.03), with 3.13 (95%CI: 3.09–3.17) muscle injuries per 1000 h of exposure in the first season and 3.06 (95%CI: 3.02–3.1) in the sixth season. A significantly higher risk for muscle injuries was discovered in the competition as the incidence for the whole observed period was 7.38 (95%CI: 7.29–7.47) compared to 2.25 (95%CI: 2.24–2.26) in the training period. Despite the relatively stable number of sustained muscle injuries, the relative proportion of muscular injuries increased over the years due to a severe decrease in the total number of injuries. Regarding the proportion of players who had sustained a muscle injury, our results suggest that approximately two out of five players can expect a muscular injury over the one-season period. Relatively high injury expectancy rates, as well as reinjury rates, require specific preventive interventions that will reduce the number and severity of new and recurred injuries. Future studies should include a wide set of predictor variables in order to establish the most important injury risk factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Injuries and Physical Rehabilitation)
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11 pages, 262 KiB  
Article
Epidemiological Study of Injuries in the Spanish Men’s Senior National Rugby XV Team
by Cristian Solís-Mencía, Elena Jiménez-Herranz, Juan José Montoya-Miñano, Mary Fiona McFall, Mikel Aramberri Gutiérrez, Pablo García-Fernández and Juan José Ramos-Álvarez
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 264; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14010264 - 28 Dec 2023
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Abstract
(1) Background: Due to the risk factors involved and the special characteristics of the game, rugby players are reported to have elevated levels of injury. The aim of this longitudinal prospective cohort study with a 2b level of evidence is to investigate the [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Due to the risk factors involved and the special characteristics of the game, rugby players are reported to have elevated levels of injury. The aim of this longitudinal prospective cohort study with a 2b level of evidence is to investigate the incidence of injury in the Spanish Men’s Senior National Rugby XV team, identify the most frequent injury types, and the game actions that cause them. (2) Methods: we studied a total of 72 players from the Spanish Men’s Senior National Rugby XV team while they played the Nation’s Cup for four consecutive seasons. We recorded all the injuries occurring both during games and training sessions, according to World Rugby consensus. (3) Results: Out of a total of 27 injuries, the higher incidence was during the matches as opposed to the training sessions (100.0 [95% CI: 62.0–132.9] per 1000 player hours (ph) and 1.17 [95% CI: 0–2.5] per 1000 ph during matches and training, respectively). The most common injuries were muscular injuries (41.6 [95% CI: 16.3–66.9] per 1000 ph) and concussion (29.1 [95% CI: 7.8–50.4] per 1000 ph). Tackling caused more injuries (50.0 [95% CI: 22.4–77.5] per 1000 ph). (4) Conclusions: Muscular injuries and concussion are the most common, 28% of concussion cases are diagnosed after the match, and tackling is the game action causing most of these injuries, with a higher incidence in players who play the whole match. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Injuries and Physical Rehabilitation)
11 pages, 1558 KiB  
Article
Cyclist Injuries from Tram Track Incidents: A Retrospective 10-Year Analysis
by Friedemann Schneider, Peter Kaiser, Anna Sophia Kuhl, Lukas Dankl, Armin Runer and Rohit Arora
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(21), 11861; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132111861 - 30 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 861
Abstract
Trams are widely used for urban public transportation. The aim of this study was to identify the total number of accidents and common injury patterns of tram-system-related cycling injuries. All patients attending the traumatology emergency department of University Hospital of Innsbruck between January [...] Read more.
Trams are widely used for urban public transportation. The aim of this study was to identify the total number of accidents and common injury patterns of tram-system-related cycling injuries. All patients attending the traumatology emergency department of University Hospital of Innsbruck between January 2010 and December 2019 due to tram-track-related bike crashes were identified. Patient demographics; date, time, and mechanism of the accident; type of injury; exact diagnosis and subsequent treatment; as well as direct treatment costs were evaluated and analyzed. A total of 378 patients (56.1% female; mean age: 38.4 years) were identified. Bike tire wedging was the most frequent accident mechanism (95.2%). A total of 108 patients (28.7%) sustained a total number of 135 fractures, predominately of the upper limb. Twenty-six patients (7.0%) required surgical treatment. No patient in this collective died as a result of the injuries sustained in the accident. During the time of this analysis, the city government implemented several measures to increase cyclists’ safety. For the main injury site, a sharp reduction in injuries was observed. Urban tram tracks are a significant risk factor for cycling-related injuries. Injuries might be reduced with the implementation of cyclist-friendly safety measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Injuries and Physical Rehabilitation)
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