Geomicrobiology: Latest Advances and Prospects

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2392

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia, IRNAS-CSIC, 41012 Sevilla, Spain
Interests: cultural heritage; air pollution; geochemistry; biodeterioration; geomicrobiology; environmental microbiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiologia, IRNAS-CSIC, 41012 Sevilla, Spain
Interests: environmental microbiology; molecular microbiology; microbial taxonomy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geomicrobiology is the study of the role of microbes in the geosphere, and encompasses the interaction of microbial life with the Earth. The awareness of a deep microbial biosphere has advanced over the last several decades due to the application of molecular techniques and the discovery of an incredible variety of genotypes and species in habitats above or below the Earth’s surface. In the last several decades, geomicrobiology has evolved into a broad field encompassing a wide range of environmental and geochemical significant processes, such as those occurring in deep-sea hydrothermal vents, marine and lacustrine sediments, ore deposits, petroleum reservoirs, deep terrestrial subsurfaces, caves, mines, extremely acidic environments, etc.

The aim of this Special Issue on “Geomicrobiology: Latest Advances and Prospects” is to provide a collection of innovative contributions that focus on current research, new methodologies, and recent advances in the field. We invite researchers to contribute original research articles as well as review articles that discuss the new trends regarding innovative geomicrobiological approaches. The keywords below are not meant to be limiting at all, and we will consider geomicrobiology in its widest sense in this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Cesareo Saiz-Jimenez
Dr. Valme Jurado Lobo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • geomicrobiology of the deep biosphere
  • geomicrobiology of extreme environments
  • geomicrobiology of the built environment
  • microbe–mineral interactions
  • microbialites formation
  • biomineralization
  • bioleaching
  • biomining and bioremediation
  • aquatic geomicrobiology
  • biogeochemical cycles
  • microbial origins of life

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

21 pages, 27022 KiB  
Article
Microorganisms Isolated from Saharan Dust Intrusions in the Canary Islands and Processes of Mineral Atmospherogenesis
by Azahara Navarro, Ana del Moral, Irene de Pablos, Rafael Delgado, Jesús Párraga, Juan M. Martín-García and Fernando Martínez-Checa
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 1862; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14051862 - 24 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1027
Abstract
Global warming due to climate change has increased the frequency of sand and dust storms that affect air quality and ecosystems in general, contributing to air pollution. The Sahara Desert is the most potent emitter of atmospheric dust. The atmosphere is an extreme [...] Read more.
Global warming due to climate change has increased the frequency of sand and dust storms that affect air quality and ecosystems in general, contributing to air pollution. The Sahara Desert is the most potent emitter of atmospheric dust. The atmosphere is an extreme environment and microorganisms living in the troposphere are exposed to greater ultraviolet radiation, desiccation, low temperatures and nutrient deprivation than in other habitats. The Iberian Peninsula, and specifically the Canary Islands—due to its strategic location—is one of the regions that receive more Saharan dust particles annually, increasing year after year, although culturable microorganisms had previously never been described. In the present work, dust samples were collected from three calima events in the Canary Islands between 2021 and 2022. The sizes, mineralogical compositions and chemical compositions of dust particles were determined by laser diffraction, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Particle morphology and biological features were also studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The mineral–bacteria interactions were described from microscopic observations, which revealed the presence of iberulites and small neoformed kaolinite crystals in association with bacteria. This article defines the term “mineral atmospherogenesis” and its variant, “mineral bioatmospherogenesis”, through microbial interaction. This is the first described case of kaolinite produced through mineral bioatmospherogenesis. The bacterial growth in atmospheric dust was illustrated in SEM images, constituting a novel finding. Twenty-three culturable microorganisms were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Members of the phyla Pseudomonadota, Bacillota and Actinomycetota have been found. Some of these microorganisms, such as Peribacillus frigoritolerans, have Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) properties. Potential human pathogenic bacteria such as Acinetobacter lwoffii were also found. The presence of desert dust and iberulites in the Canary Islands, together with transported biological components such as bacteria, could have a significant impact on the ecosystem and human health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geomicrobiology: Latest Advances and Prospects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

17 pages, 694 KiB  
Review
The Marine Bacterial Genus Euzebya Is Distributed Worldwide in Terrestrial Environments: A Review
by Jose Luis Gonzalez-Pimentel, Tamara Martin-Pozas, Valme Jurado, Leonila Laiz, Angel Fernandez-Cortes, Sergio Sanchez-Moral and Cesareo Saiz-Jimenez
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(17), 9644; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13179644 - 25 Aug 2023
Viewed by 825
Abstract
The advent of molecular tools, and particularly next-generation sequencing, has dramatically changed our knowledge of the diversity of microbial life on Earth. In recent decades, many studies on different terrestrial environments have described the intriguing diversity and abundance of Euzebyales/Euzebyaceae/Euzebya, yet its [...] Read more.
The advent of molecular tools, and particularly next-generation sequencing, has dramatically changed our knowledge of the diversity of microbial life on Earth. In recent decades, many studies on different terrestrial environments have described the intriguing diversity and abundance of Euzebyales/Euzebyaceae/Euzebya, yet its role in the geochemical cycle of elements is unknown. In addition, as far as we know, no Euzebya isolates have been obtained from terrestrial niches. In this review, it is shown that Euzebya and other haloalkaliphilic bacteria can thrive under harsh conditions, such as high concentrations of sodium and/or calcium, high electric conductivity and alkaline pH, highly variable temperatures, and water fluctuations. These conditions are quasi-extreme in the studied terrestrial environments. However, the culture media used so far for isolation have failed to reproduce the original conditions of these terrestrial ecosystems, and this is likely the reason why strains of Euzebya and other bacteria that inhabit the same niche could not be isolated. It is expected that culture media reproducing the environmental conditions outlined in this review could cope with the isolation of terrestrial Euzebya and other haloalkaliphilic genera. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geomicrobiology: Latest Advances and Prospects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop