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Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2024) | Viewed by 6086

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Orthopaedics and Traumatology Unit, “Maggiore della carità” Hospital, Department of Health Sciences, University of Piemonte Orientale (UPO), Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara, Italy
Interests: orthopaedics and traumatology; musculoskeletal system; hand surgery; foot and ankle surgery; regenerative surgery; connective tissue engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences (DIBINEM), Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, 40123 Bologna, Italy
2. 1st Orthopaedic and Traumatologic Clinic, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Via Giulio Cesare Pupilli 1, 40136 Bologna, Italy
Interests: foot and ankle surgery

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, University of Verona, 37121 Verona, VR, Italy
2. President of the Italian Society of Foot and Ankle (SICP), Parma, Italy
Interests: foot and ankle surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to address the frequent foot and ankle pathologies due to sporting activities. More and more people practice sports today, and unfortunately, too often without adequate physical preparation. High-level athletes, on the other hand, are pushed to ever greater performances by forcing their feet to the limit of safety. As a result, a multitude of injuries are prevented, diagnosed, and treated on a daily basis. We must consider both macro- and micro-traumas, with their risk factors and the diagnostic and therapeutic paths from conservative orthopedic to regenerative and surgical treatment up to rehabilitation and insurance aspects. Various professional figures can therefore contribute to this Special Issue: orthopedists, traumatologists, podiatrists, physiatrists and physiotherapists, sports doctors, athletic trainers, and anyone who can and wants to deepen one of the countless aspects of this relevant challenge to sports injuries of the foot and ankle. Both original research articles and literature reviews are welcome. We look forward to your contribution.

Prof. Dr. Massimiliano Leigheb
Prof. Dr. Antonio Mazzotti
Prof. Dr. Elena Manuela Samaila
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • foot
  • ankle
  • lesion
  • sport
  • orthopedics
  • trauma

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 4017 KiB  
Article
Investigating the Mediating Role of Pain in the Relationship between Ankle Joint Position Sense and Balance Assessed Using Computerized Posturography in Individuals with Unilateral Chronic Ankle Instability: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Fareed F. Alfaya, Ravi Shankar Reddy, Mastour Saeed Alshahrani, Jaya Shanker Tedla, Snehil Dixit, Kumar Gular and Debjani Mukherjee
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(14), 8169; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13148169 - 13 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1040
Abstract
Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is characterized by impaired ankle joint position sense (JPS) and compromised balance. Despite previous studies investigating the correlation between ankle JPS and balance in individuals with CAI, the potential mediating effect of pain in this relationship remains unclear. Understanding [...] Read more.
Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is characterized by impaired ankle joint position sense (JPS) and compromised balance. Despite previous studies investigating the correlation between ankle JPS and balance in individuals with CAI, the potential mediating effect of pain in this relationship remains unclear. Understanding the role of pain as a mediator between ankle JPS and balance could provide valuable insights into the complex interplay among these variables in individuals with CAI. Therefore, further research is needed to elucidate the mediating effect of pain and its implications in assessing and managing ankle JPS and balance deficits in individuals with CAI. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the mediating role of pain in the association between ankle JPS and balance in individuals with unilateral CAI. Methods: Fifty-five individuals diagnosed with CAI participated in this study. Ankle JPS was assessed using a digital inclinometer, whereas the balance was measured using a computerized dynamic posturography device. Results: Participants with CAI showed impaired ankle JPS in the affected leg compared to that in the asymptomatic leg (p < 0.001). Ankle JPS errors were greater in both dorsiflexion and plantarflexion directions in the CAI. Balance was compromised in the CAI leg (p < 0.001). Moderate correlations (p < 0.001, r = 0.31 to 0.48) were found between the balance variables. Pain significantly mediated the ankle JPS-balance relationship in the CAI (p < 0.05, Sobel test). The findings suggest that individuals with CAI exhibit impaired ankle JPS and compromised balance. Pain plays a mediating role in the association between ankle JPS and balance in individuals with CAI. These results highlight the importance of considering pain as a potential mediator when assessing and treating balance issues in individuals with CAI. Healthcare professionals should incorporate assessments of ankle JPS and pain into the management of interventions that address these factors and improve balance and functional ability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries)
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Review

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13 pages, 289 KiB  
Review
Applications and Future Perspective of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields in Foot and Ankle Sport-Related Injuries
by Antonio Mazzotti, Laura Langone, Elena Artioli, Simone Ottavio Zielli, Alberto Arceri, Stefania Setti, Massimiliano Leigheb, Elena Manuela Samaila and Cesare Faldini
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(9), 5807; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13095807 - 8 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2201
Abstract
Foot and ankle injuries are common in many sports. One of the main athletes issues is the time for sport resumption after trauma. Recently, extensive efforts have been made to speed up the athletes’ return-to-sport and to prevent joint degeneration. Among the conservative [...] Read more.
Foot and ankle injuries are common in many sports. One of the main athletes issues is the time for sport resumption after trauma. Recently, extensive efforts have been made to speed up the athletes’ return-to-sport and to prevent joint degeneration. Among the conservative treatment options, biophysical stimulation with pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) is listed. This narrative review aims to outline current applications of PEMFs in main foot and ankle sport-related injuries, in particular in the treatment of bone marrow edema, osteochondral defects, fractures, and nonunions. Despite further high-quality studies on foot and ankle injuries are needed, PEMFs seem to be a valid aid to enhance the endogenous osteogenesis, to resolve the bone marrow edema, to inhibit the joint inflammation, preserving articular cartilage degeneration, and to relieve pain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries)

Other

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10 pages, 1970 KiB  
Case Report
Minimally Invasive Reconstruction of the Ankle Lateral Ligament Complex in Chronic Ankle Instability: Clinical Outcomes, Return to Sport and Recurrence Rate at Minimum Follow up of 5 Years
by Federico Giuseppe Usuelli, Alice Montagna, Rudy Sangaletti, Cristian Indino, Camilla Maccario and Federico Alberto Grassi
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(13), 7923; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13137923 - 6 Jul 2023
Viewed by 837
Abstract
Background: Chronic ankle instability is a common condition that develops after lateral ankle sprains. Many surgical techniques have been described in case of failure of conservative treatment. The purpose of this paper is to present the results in terms of clinical outcomes, return [...] Read more.
Background: Chronic ankle instability is a common condition that develops after lateral ankle sprains. Many surgical techniques have been described in case of failure of conservative treatment. The purpose of this paper is to present the results in terms of clinical outcomes, return to sport and recurrence rate after reconstruction of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle with a minimally invasive approach at a minimum follow up of five years. Methods: This retrospective study involved forty-seven patients treated for chronic ankle instability from January 2013 to November 2017. The clinical outcomes were evaluated with the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle and hindfoot score (AOFAS score), the University of California–Los Angeles Rating Scale (UCLA Rating Scale), the Karlsson–Peterson ankle instability score and the Halasi scale at a mean follow up time of 80 months. Results: The mean age of the patients was 42 years (23–63). The mean VAS pain score decreased from 5.6 (2–9) pre-operatively to 0.7 (0–7) post-operatively. The mean UCLA Rating Scale score improved from 7.7 (4–8) before surgical treatment to 9.2 (6–10) afterwards. The AOFAS score increased from a pre-operative mean value of 66.5 (40–95) to a post-operative mean value of 94 (88–100) and the Halasi scale from a pre-injury mean value of 4.3 (2–8) to 4.5 post-operatively (2–8). The mean Karlsson–Peterson ankle instability score increased from 71 (40–90) pre-operatively to 87.9 (70–90) post-operatively. During this period of follow up, the procedure survival rate was 95.7%, with two cases of recurrence of ankle sprain post-operatively after twelve months in one case and forty months in the other case. Conclusions: The described technique of reconstruction of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligament with a minimally invasive approach with a semitendinosus autograft is a viable treatment option for chronic ankle instability and enables the majority of patients to regain their activity and sport level with a low recurrence rate at a mid-term follow up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries)
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13 pages, 563 KiB  
Systematic Review
Return to Sport after Surgical Treatment for Dislocation of the Peroneal Tendon: A Systematic Review of the Current Literature
by Piergianni Di Santo, Susanna Basciani, Giuseppe Francesco Papalia, Simone Santini, Gianluca Marineo, Nicola Papapietro and Andrea Marinozzi
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(13), 7685; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13137685 - 29 Jun 2023
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Abstract
Purpose: This study aims to analyze the return to normal activities and sports after surgical management of peroneal tendon dislocation through different surgical techniques. Methods: This review included studies (retrospective case series, prospective cohort study) that analyzed different aspects: return to sport (RTS), [...] Read more.
Purpose: This study aims to analyze the return to normal activities and sports after surgical management of peroneal tendon dislocation through different surgical techniques. Methods: This review included studies (retrospective case series, prospective cohort study) that analyzed different aspects: return to sport (RTS), American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society Score (AOFAS), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), satisfaction, and redislocation episodes after surgical treatment. We performed a systematic review, analyzing 1699 articles. We researched our selected studies through PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane. The last search was performed in December 2022. We used the MINORS score to perform a quality assessment of pooled data. In total, 20 studies were included. Results: The postoperative AOFAS score, VAS scale, and high satisfaction percentages all improve with surgical therapy. At long-term follow-up, the redislocation following surgical treatment is minimal. Compared to patients who only receive superior peroneal retinaculum (SPR) repair and other surgical procedures, patients with groove deepening and SPR repair have greater rates of returning to sports (bony and rerouting procedures). Conclusions: Peroneal tendon dislocation surgery offers good outcomes, a quick return to sport, and high patient satisfaction. Those who received both groove deepening and SPR repair as opposed to other surgical procedures have greater rates of returning to sports. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries)
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