Intelligent Electronic Monitoring Systems and Their Application

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 March 2024 | Viewed by 2417

Special Issue Editors

Plasma Processing Laboratory, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos Str. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas, Lithuania
Interests: material engineering and the synthesis and research of new materials; the diagnostics of plasma and high-temperature flows and the development of diagnostic tools; electronics and its research; plasma processes
Dr. Vitas Valincius
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Plasma Processing Laboratory, Lithuanian Energy Institute, Breslaujos Str. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas, Lithuania
Interests: the development and research of various purpose direct current plasma sources; the study of processes and phenomena occurring in discharge channels, plasma flows, and currents; the generation of water vapor plasma and its use for fuel conversion and the neutralization of hazardous waste

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of the journal will publish articles relating to intelligent electronic systems. Electronic systems are widely used in various fields when it is necessary to monitor various parameters. Electronic systems can be designed and manufactured based on PCBs and microcontrollers. In order for the electronics monitoring system to work, it is necessary to create an original software code for its management. This field includes various disciplines such as programming, digital electronics, automatic control, physics, telecommunications, etc. The intended scope of the Special Issue covers areas such as computer science, data electronic monitoring systems, the application of digital electronics, the development of control applications, etc.

Dr. Žydrūnas Kavaliauskas
Dr. Vitas Valincius
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • electronics
  • monitoring systems
  • digital
  • electronics
  • program code
  • database
  • microcontrollers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 1155 KiB  
Article
Motion Detectors as Additional Monitoring Devices in the Intensive Care Unit—A Proof-of-Concept Study
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(16), 9319; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13169319 - 16 Aug 2023
Viewed by 643
Abstract
Background: Monitoring the vital signs of delirious patients in an intensive care unit (ICU) is challenging, as they might (un-)intentionally remove devices attached to their bodies. In mock-up scenarios, we systematically assessed whether a motion detector (MD) attached to the bed may help [...] Read more.
Background: Monitoring the vital signs of delirious patients in an intensive care unit (ICU) is challenging, as they might (un-)intentionally remove devices attached to their bodies. In mock-up scenarios, we systematically assessed whether a motion detector (MD) attached to the bed may help in identifying emergencies. Methods: We recruited 15 employees of the ICU and equipped an ICU bed with an MD (IRON Software GmbH, Grünwald, Germany). Participants were asked to replay 22 mock-up scenes of one-minute duration each: 12 scenes with movements and 10 without movements, of which 5 were emergency scenes (“lying dead-still, with no or very shallow breathing”). Blinded recordings were presented to an evaluation panel consisting of an experienced ICU nurse and a physician, who was asked to assess and rate the presence of motions. Results: Fifteen participants (nine women; 173 ± 7.0 cm; 78 ± 19 kg) joined the study. In total, 286 out of 330 scenes (86.7%) were rated correctly. Ratings were false negative (FN: “no movements detected, but recorded”) in 7 out of 180 motion scenes (3.9%). Ratings were false positive (FP: “movements detected, but not recorded”) in 37 out of 150 scenes (24.7%), more often in men than women (26 out of 60 vs. 11 out of 90, respectively; p < 0.001). Of note, in 16 of these 37 FP-rated scenes, a vibrating mobile phone was identified as a potential confounder. The emergency scenes were correctly rated in 64 of the 75 runs (85.3%); 10 of the 11 FP-rated scenes occurred in male subjects. Conclusions: The MD allowed for identifying motions of test subjects with high sensitivity (96%) and acceptable specificity (75%). Accuracy might increase further if activities are recorded continuously under real-world conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligent Electronic Monitoring Systems and Their Application)
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Review

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22 pages, 1363 KiB  
Review
A Comprehensive Review and Analysis of Nanosensors for Structural Health Monitoring in Bridge Maintenance: Innovations, Challenges, and Future Perspectives
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(20), 11149; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132011149 - 10 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1474
Abstract
This paper presents a thorough review and detailed analysis of nanosensors for structural health monitoring (SHM) in the context of bridge maintenance. With rapid advancements in nanotechnology, nanosensors have emerged as promising tools for detecting and assessing the structural integrity of bridges. The [...] Read more.
This paper presents a thorough review and detailed analysis of nanosensors for structural health monitoring (SHM) in the context of bridge maintenance. With rapid advancements in nanotechnology, nanosensors have emerged as promising tools for detecting and assessing the structural integrity of bridges. The objective of this review is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the various types of nanosensors utilized in bridge maintenance, their operating principles, fabrication techniques, and integration strategies. Furthermore, this paper explores the challenges associated with nanosensor deployment, such as signal processing, power supply, and data interpretation. Finally, the review concludes with an outlook on future developments in the field of nanosensors for SHM in bridge maintenance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligent Electronic Monitoring Systems and Their Application)
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