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Celebrating Applied Sciences 20,000 Articles Milestone: Invited Papers in Chemistry Section

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical and Molecular Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 21024

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Applied Sciences has reached another remarkable milestone this year by publishing 20,000 articles in the journal, and to celebrate this special achievement, we have launched a Special Issue devoted to Chemistry entitled “Celebrating Applied Sciences 20,000 Articles Milestone: Invited Papers in Chemistry Section”.

This Special Issue will consist of comprehensive reviews and original research articles featuring important and recent developments or advancements in all areas of chemistry. The submitted papers can cover either experimental or theoretical aspects (or both) of all branches of chemistry and its sub-disciplines. These also include research on the diverse applications of chemistry in solving various societal problems and issues. Subject areas include (but are not limited to): analytical chemistry, electrochemistry, environmental chemistry, inorganic chemistry, nanochemistry, organic chemistry, food chemistry, physical chemistry, materials chemistry, etc. More details can be found at:

https://www.mdpi.com/journal/applsci/sections/applied_chemistry

We invite you to join us in this remarkable celebration by contributing a comprehensive review article or an original research paper for peer-review and possible publication in this Special Issue to commemorate the publication this year of 20,000 articles in Applied Sciences.

Prof. Dr. Samuel Adeloju
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 1152 KiB  
Article
Chemical Characterisation, Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities of Pinus pinaster Ait. and Pinus pinea L. Bark Polar Extracts: Prospecting Forestry By-Products as Renewable Sources of Bioactive Compounds
by Patrícia A. B. Ramos, Carla Pereira, Ana Peixoto Gomes, Rodrigo T. Neto, Adelaide Almeida, Sónia A. O. Santos, Artur M. S. Silva and Armando J. D. Silvestre
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(2), 784; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12020784 - 13 Jan 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2850
Abstract
Agroforestry by-products have gained rising attention in recent years as they represent inexpensive and abundant raw materials that are a source of added-value chemicals, e.g., for food and pharmaceutical applications, as well as for bioenergy generation. Pinus pinaster Ait. bark extracts are consumed [...] Read more.
Agroforestry by-products have gained rising attention in recent years as they represent inexpensive and abundant raw materials that are a source of added-value chemicals, e.g., for food and pharmaceutical applications, as well as for bioenergy generation. Pinus pinaster Ait. bark extracts are consumed worldwide for their cardiovascular benefits, whilst the health potential of Pinus pinea L. bark has not yet been deeply exploited. Therefore, this study highlights the chemical characterisation of Portuguese P. pinaster Ait. and P. pinea L. bark polar extracts, via ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-DAD-MSn) analysis, and their antioxidant and antibacterial activities. Quinic acid, an A-type procyanidin dimer isomer, protocatechuic acid, and quercetin were identified for the first time as P. pinea L. bark components. Moreover, this bark demonstrated a higher total content of identified polar compounds than P. pinaster Ait. bark, with quinic acid being the most abundant compound identified. Regarding antioxidant activity, the pine bark polar extracts exhibited strong reducing power and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging effects compared to natural antioxidants. Moreover, the bactericidal actions of pine bark extracts were shown against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli at a 3.13–25 mg mL−1 range. Globally, these promising insights can boost the sustainable exploitation of P. pinea L. bark, as already occurs with P. pinaster Ait. bark, for the food and biomedical fields. Full article
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17 pages, 685 KiB  
Article
HAZOP Analysis in Terms of Safety Operations Processes for Oil Production Units: A Case Study
by Artur de J. Penelas and José C. M. Pires
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(21), 10210; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112110210 - 31 Oct 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 13461
Abstract
The Hazard and Operability Study (HAZOP) methodology is considered one of the most effective techniques for risk analysis, developed fundamentally to provide regular processes with reduced risks that aim to guarantee the safety of activities and the operability of the production units. The [...] Read more.
The Hazard and Operability Study (HAZOP) methodology is considered one of the most effective techniques for risk analysis, developed fundamentally to provide regular processes with reduced risks that aim to guarantee the safety of activities and the operability of the production units. The study aims to apply the HAZOP methodology in process and safety operations in the oil production industry. A crude oil production unit was divided into smaller sections that were analysed. By applying the HAZOP methodology, 71 possibilities of relevant risks were identified. The environmental, health and economic impacts were estimated to establish safeguard priorities for them. The application of this methodology and the defined safeguards generated 47 recommendations to mitigate the detected problems. The study contributions were to demonstrate the efficacies of HAZOP methodology to identify potential hazards and evaluate the potential hazards obtained for malfunctioning of equipment and property in terms of the resultant impacts either new or existing process facilities, and as a useful tool to provide essential knowledge for the companies’ leaders, decision-maker, and operations managers. Full article
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13 pages, 2409 KiB  
Article
The Transformation by Catalysis of Prebiotic Chemical Systems to Useful Biochemicals: A Perspective Based on IR Spectroscopy of the Primary Chemicals: Solid-Phase and Water-Soluble Catalysts
by Ragnar Larsson and Abdul Malek
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(21), 10125; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112110125 - 28 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1338
Abstract
This study is a continuation of our research on understanding the possible chemical routes to the evolution of life on earth based on the “Selective Energy Transfer” (SET) theory. This theory identifies the specific vibrational mode of the catalyst that is in energy-resonance [...] Read more.
This study is a continuation of our research on understanding the possible chemical routes to the evolution of life on earth based on the “Selective Energy Transfer” (SET) theory. This theory identifies the specific vibrational mode of the catalyst that is in energy-resonance with a suitable vibrational mode of the reactant. In this way, energy is transferred from catalyst to reactant up to the energy of activation, making possible a particular chemical outcome. Then, we extend this model to the mostly unknown and highly complex environment of the hydrothermal vents, to speculate how prebiotic chemicals, necessary for the evolution of life, could have formed. It is to the credit of the SET theory that it can reflect the slight difference in the catalytic system that gives dramatically very different chemical outcome. It is shown, here, how in model laboratory experiments, methanol gives dimethyl ether (DME) in a 100% yield with Cu exchanged montmorillonite as the catalyst, or a very different product methyl formate (MF) in lower yields, with another Cu2+ ion-exchanged clay mineral (laponite) as the catalyst system. We also show, based on standard laboratory experiments, how COS (carbonyl sulfide) with a strong absorption band at 2079 cm−1 by itself and/or catalyzed by montmorillonite with strong Si-O-Si asymmetric vibration of 1040 cm−1 can react with alpha-amino acids to form alpha-amino acid thiocarbamate (AATC), which we feel could represent the most primitive analogue to coenzyme A (CoASH), a highly versatile bio-enzyme that is vital both for the metabolism and the synthesis of biochemicals in the living system. AATC itself may have undergone evolutionary developments through billions of years to transform itself into coenzyme A (CoASH) and its acetyl ester analogue acetyl coenzyme A (ACoA). Full article
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15 pages, 1840 KiB  
Article
Water and Sediment Bacterial Communities in a Small Mediterranean, Oxygen-Stratified, Saline Lake (Lake Alboraj, SE Spain)
by Yolanda Espín, Alfonso Menchén, José Luis Moreno, David Sanz, Manuel Álvarez-Ortí, José Antonio Fernández and Juan José Gómez-Alday
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(14), 6309; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11146309 - 8 Jul 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2264
Abstract
Lake Alboraj, located in southeast Spain, was declared natural Microreserve and included into European Natura-2000 Network due to its contribution to environmental heritage. Unfortunately, the ecological status of the lake has changed dramatically, mainly due to the lowering of water table caused by [...] Read more.
Lake Alboraj, located in southeast Spain, was declared natural Microreserve and included into European Natura-2000 Network due to its contribution to environmental heritage. Unfortunately, the ecological status of the lake has changed dramatically, mainly due to the lowering of water table caused by groundwater abstractions for irrigation. It is a permanent small karstic lake whose surface has reduced in the last decades to nearly the third part of its historical water level. The water column shows a marked seasonal oxycline, that splits an aerobic upper layer (epilimnion) from an anaerobic layer below (hypolimnion). Sequencing 16S rRNA gene amplicons and applying chemical tools at epilimnion, hypolimnion and sediment, showed a clear gradient in the bacterial community structure, which support the co-existence of assimilatory and dissimilatory microbial mediated reactions. Results allows to infer that microbial stratification could provide various physical and chemical environments at different depths in the water column related to biogeochemical reactions providing N-S-C- recycling processes. Full article
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