Power Systems Stability in Current and Future Scenarios

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2024 | Viewed by 1447

Special Issue Editor

Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Università di Palermo, 90128 Palermo, Italy
Interests: renewable energy sources; dynamic analysis; grid integration; frequency control; system stability; modeling and algorithms
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The evolution of power systems poses several challenges in terms of their control and stability. Conventional approaches and analyses might no longer be valid under new scenarios, and therefore, further research, methodologies, and studies are certainly required. Some aspects, which are relevant in both current and future scenarios, include decrease in inertia and frequency stability issues; decrease in system strength and voltage stability issues; decrease in damping in the system and oscillatory stability issues; effects of the control of power converters, either grid-following or grid-forming.

This Special Issue invites original research papers and review articles addressing the different aspects of power systems dynamics, control, and stability in current and future scenarios.

Dr. Rossano Musca
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • power systems control
  • power systems stability
  • power systems dynamics
  • frequency stability
  • voltage stability
  • oscillatory stability
  • system inertia
  • system strength
  • system damping
  • power converters
  • grid-following
  • grid-forming

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 1153 KiB  
Article
A New Framework for Active Loss Reduction and Voltage Profile Enhancement in a Distributed Generation-Dominated Radial Distribution Network
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 1077; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14031077 - 26 Jan 2024
Viewed by 441
Abstract
In recent times, a significant amount of power loss and system instability due to high voltage deviation experienced by modern power systems, in addition to the pressing issues challenging the power industry such as pollution—especially the emission of greenhouse gases—and aging infrastructures, have [...] Read more.
In recent times, a significant amount of power loss and system instability due to high voltage deviation experienced by modern power systems, in addition to the pressing issues challenging the power industry such as pollution—especially the emission of greenhouse gases—and aging infrastructures, have posed a serious threat to system operations. Distributed generation has been identified as one main solution capable of reducing pollution when solar and wind power are used and, hence, rejuvenating dilapidated infrastructures and redeeming climatic changes. This paper presents a novel two-stage approach for the identification of suitable locations for DG placement and the sizing of DG for loss reduction and voltage stability enhancement. The first stage explored the use of a network structure to develop a coupling factor (CF) approach that was non-iterative in nature to determine suitable DG locations. In the second stage, the size of the DG was determined using the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. The main objective was to obtain an optimal voltage profile of the system under consideration while lowering the power loss in the system and ensuring network stability amidst DG incorporation. The model design, optimization and simulation were carried out using the MATLAB 2016a environment and the IEEE 33-bus test system, in which DG was integrated. The influence of increasing the level of DG placement in the system was then investigated. The forward/backward sweep method was applied to monitor the optimization process. The voltage profiles for both the base case when no DG was integrated and the case of incremental DG integration were considered. The results obtained for both single and multiple DG integration are compared with those obtained using the existing methods. The results show the efficiency and applicability of the new non-iterative scheme in the quick identification of DG locations for voltage profile enhancement and network real power loss reduction in radial distribution networks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Systems Stability in Current and Future Scenarios)
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18 pages, 4293 KiB  
Article
Development of Energy Storage Systems for High Penetration of Renewable Energy Grids
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(21), 11978; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132111978 - 02 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 852
Abstract
As the proportion of renewable energy generation systems increases, traditional power generation facilities begin to face challenges, such as reduced output power and having the power turned off. The challenges are causing changes in the structure of the power system. Renewable energy sources, [...] Read more.
As the proportion of renewable energy generation systems increases, traditional power generation facilities begin to face challenges, such as reduced output power and having the power turned off. The challenges are causing changes in the structure of the power system. Renewable energy sources, mainly wind and solar energy cannot provide stable inertia and frequency regulation capability. Ultimately, the power system’s emergency response capability to face an N-1 is reduced, which leads to a reduction in system stability. Therefore, the application technology of the battery energy storage system is used to support the impact of changes in the new power system structure. This paper designed control technologies based on the WECC second-generation generic model, namely, dynamic regulation, steady regulation, and virtual inertia regulation. The models and control strategies are verified on Taiwan’s 2025 power system target conditions, which consider the expected capacities for battery energy storage systems, and renewable energy sources with different load and N-1 fault levels. According to the simulation results, the capabilities of the RoCoF limitation, frequency nadir, frequency recovery, and system oscillation regulation are evaluated in the proposed strategies. Finally, the analysis results can help power operators make informed decisions when selecting and deploying battery energy storage systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Systems Stability in Current and Future Scenarios)
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