Research of Sports Medicine on Health Care

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2024 | Viewed by 1850

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Departamento de Educacion, Universidad de Almeria, Carretera de Sacramento s/n, 04120 La Canada de San Urbano, Almeria, Spain
Interests: biological maturity; anthropometry; sprint canoeing and swimming

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia, 30107 Murcia, Spain
Interests: sports medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to explore the intricate intersection of sports medicine and healthcare, shedding light on the latest advancements, insights, and applications in this evolving field. It will encompass a wide range of topics, including but not limited to exercise prescription for various health conditions, doping prevention, injury prevention and rehabilitation, nutrition's role in healthcare, mental health benefits of physical activity, and the utilization of technology in monitoring and improving health through sports. We invite contributions from researchers, clinicians, and experts in sports medicine, exercise physiology, rehabilitation, nutrition, public health, and related disciplines.

The primary goal of this Special Issue is to foster a deeper understanding of how sports medicine interventions can contribute to healthcare outcomes. It seeks to bridge the gap between athletic performance optimization and the promotion of holistic health, providing evidence-based insights to guide clinical practice and public health strategies.

This Special Issue targets a diverse readership, including sports medicine practitioners, healthcare professionals, researchers, policymakers, and fitness enthusiasts, creating a platform for knowledge exchange and collaboration. The research presented in this Special Issue has the potential to reshape healthcare paradigms, inspiring novel interventions that leverage sports medicine principles to prevent and manage health conditions. It also paves the way for innovative strategies in public health initiatives that promote active lifestyles for improved well-being.

Dr. Daniel López-Plaza
Dr. Pedro Manonelles
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health
  • injury rehabilitation
  • exercise prescription
  • doping prevention
  • injury prevention
  • healthcare

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

9 pages, 641 KiB  
Article
Degree of Hamstring Extensibility and Its Relationship with Pelvic Tilt in Professional Cyclists
by José M. Muyor, Pedro A. López-Miñarro, Fernando Alacid and Daniel López-Plaza
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(9), 3912; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14093912 - 3 May 2024
Viewed by 450
Abstract
The cyclist’s posture is typically characterized by a trunk flexion position to reach the handlebar of the bike. The pelvis serves as the base of the spine, and its tilt has been associated with the degree of extensibility of the hamstring, particularly in [...] Read more.
The cyclist’s posture is typically characterized by a trunk flexion position to reach the handlebar of the bike. The pelvis serves as the base of the spine, and its tilt has been associated with the degree of extensibility of the hamstring, particularly in flexion postures of the trunk. The aim of this study was to determine whether, in professional cyclists, the degree of hamstring extensibility influences the pelvic tilt maintained while seated on the bicycle with support from the three handlebar grips of the road bike, as well as in other positions of the bicycle. To evaluate pelvic tilt, all participants were measured using the Spinal Mouse system. The results revealed statistically significant differences in pelvic tilt among the six positions assessed (p ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, the degree of hamstring extensibility of the hamstrings presented a strong and positive correlation with pelvic tilt in standing posture (r = 0.82), Sit-and-Reach (r = 0.76), and Toe-Touch (r = 0.88). However, the degree of hamstring extensibility showed no significant correlations with pelvic tilt in any posture maintained on the bicycle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research of Sports Medicine on Health Care)
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12 pages, 1210 KiB  
Article
What Factors Influence the Injuries of Canoeists and Kayakers over the Years?
by Jose Luis Garcia-Soidan, Raquel Leiros-Rodriguez, Manuel Isorna-Folgar and Vicente Romo-Perez
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(6), 2637; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14062637 - 21 Mar 2024
Viewed by 463
Abstract
(1) Background: The purpose of this study was to analyze the number of injuries in the canoe and kayak disciplines. (2) Methods: A cross-sectional and retrospective epidemiological study was conducted on a convenience sample of elite canoeists and kayakers during the Spanish Championships [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The purpose of this study was to analyze the number of injuries in the canoe and kayak disciplines. (2) Methods: A cross-sectional and retrospective epidemiological study was conducted on a convenience sample of elite canoeists and kayakers during the Spanish Championships of each canoeing and kayaking modality. Retrospective data were collected on the number, body area, type, and severity of injuries sustained in previous seasons, as well as other affiliation data. Four separate multiple linear regression models were used to investigate the impact of the sports mode of canoeing, age, and sex on the occurrence of injuries. (3) Results: The findings indicate a distinction in injury frequency between canoeing and kayaking modalities, with injuries being more common in canoeing. The occurrence of mild injuries decreases with age among canoeists, while remaining consistent in kayaking. As athletes age, confidence intervals increase. Canoeists have a higher injury probability, and across all injury types, men have a lower injury risk. (4) Conclusions: The frequency of injuries is higher in the canoe modality across all age groups. Coaches and athletes should be well-informed about the insights provided in this study to implement targeted injury prevention strategies, especially in women canoeists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research of Sports Medicine on Health Care)
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9 pages, 544 KiB  
Article
Fibromyalgia and Sedentarism: Which Came First, the Chicken or the Egg?
by Carmen Daniela Quero-Calero, Eduardo Otero, Oriol Abellán-Aynés and Eduardo Ortega
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(6), 2357; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14062357 - 11 Mar 2024
Viewed by 598
Abstract
Fibromyalgia is a chronic disease that causes widespread pain throughout the body, as well as fatigue and a variety of other accompanying symptoms. Physical activity is one of the most useful non-pharmacological treatments for pain and symptom reduction. Therefore, the main objective of [...] Read more.
Fibromyalgia is a chronic disease that causes widespread pain throughout the body, as well as fatigue and a variety of other accompanying symptoms. Physical activity is one of the most useful non-pharmacological treatments for pain and symptom reduction. Therefore, the main objective of this research was to analyse the objective levels of sedentary lifestyle and physical activity, as well as the study of heart rate variability as a predictor of health. A total of 21 women previously diagnosed with fibromyalgia (FM) and 10 healthy women of the same age range participated in the study. Accelerometry was used for the determination of physical activity and sedentary lifestyle as well as the study of heart rate variability (HRV) at rest for the assessment of cardiovascular health. The results show that participants with fibromyalgia have higher levels of sedentary lifestyles and worse cardiovascular health outcomes compared to healthy participants not diagnosed with fibromyalgia. In conclusion, it is observed that the analysis of heart rate variability is a good predictor for the determination of cardiovascular health in patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia. A debate is open to whether sedentary lifestyles and being overweight accentuate the fibromyalgia disease or whether it is the disease itself that favors increased physical inactivity, reflected in inferior cardiovascular health. Future research is needed to deepen this analysis in order to improve the quality of life of these patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research of Sports Medicine on Health Care)
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