Functional Fermented Food Products II

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 May 2024 | Viewed by 4061

Special Issue Editor

Department of Biotechnology, Microbiology and Human Nutrition, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, 20-704 Lublin, Poland
Interests: nutrition in cardiovascular disease; nutrition in osteoporosis; application of inulin in food; probiotics; functional fermented milk drinks; rheological analysis of dairy products; chemical analysis of toxic metals, nitrates, and nitrites in fruits and vegetables
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The market for fermented food products is growing every year. Many new products are being created, with new flavors and functional additives being used. Therefore, there is a need for an update on the latest knowledge concerning this product group. The most important fermented food products include fermented milk beverages (e.g., yogurt, kefir, buttermilk), cheese, fermented vegetables (e.g., sauerkraut, pickled cucumbers), and processed meats (e.g., chorizo, salami, pepperoni). The modern consumer looks for both traditional and new products with functional properties. Fermented food products are made by means of microorganisms. In recent years, many researchers have focused on probiotic microorganisms which not only affect technological functions but can also have a positive effect on human health. Because there are still many unanswered questions, especially in the context of new functional and health food products, I believe that this Special issue will broaden the horizons of our knowledge of fermented food products.

Prof. Dr. Pawel Glibowski
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • fermented milk products
  • functional products
  • probiotic microorganisms
  • fermented vegetables
  • fermented meat products

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 334 KiB  
Article
Nutritional and Food Safety Characteristics of Jameed—A Traditional Dairy Product of Drylands
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 678; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14020678 - 13 Jan 2024
Viewed by 385
Abstract
Jameed is a traditional dried dairy product in Jordan that is known under different names in the Middle East, Turkey, Central Asia, China, and Mongolia. It has been produced in the region for centuries and makes a significant contribution (up to 20%) to [...] Read more.
Jameed is a traditional dried dairy product in Jordan that is known under different names in the Middle East, Turkey, Central Asia, China, and Mongolia. It has been produced in the region for centuries and makes a significant contribution (up to 20%) to the income of small-scale traditional dairy processors who are based in sheep-producing districts. This study aims to assess the nutritional value of Jameed as a model for traditional dried fermented dairy products and to highlight the safety of the product quality and some of the health risks that may arise. For this purpose, 80 samples of Jameed were collected from the market covering all regions of the Kingdom of Jordan. The samples were analyzed for nutritional value and health risks by standard and approved methods. Results show that the total solids were 84.57%, with a large variation from 73 to 92%. Producers use a lot of salt to control elevated acidity during the drying of Jameed. The salt concentrations in collected samples were 15.68%. The average acidity was 6.79%. Moreover, farmers heavily use antibiotics to control mastitis without observing milk withdrawal. The residues of antibiotics were detected in 50.65% of the analyzed samples. The samples show large variations in measured values, reflecting differences in processing methods, homogeneity, and standardization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Fermented Food Products II)
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13 pages, 1996 KiB  
Article
Antioxidant Potential of Yogurts Produced from Milk of Cows Fed Fodder Supplemented with Herbal Mixture with Regard to Refrigerated Storage
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(18), 10469; https://doi.org/10.3390/app131810469 - 19 Sep 2023
Viewed by 608
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the potential of milk from herbal blend-fed cows to be used for the production of yogurts exhibiting increased antioxidant potential with regard to the duration of refrigerated storage of the products. Bulk milk (control—CM and [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to assess the potential of milk from herbal blend-fed cows to be used for the production of yogurts exhibiting increased antioxidant potential with regard to the duration of refrigerated storage of the products. Bulk milk (control—CM and experimental—EM) intended for the production of yogurts was provided by a dairy cattle breeding farm. The milk samples were analyzed to determine their basic chemical composition (the content of dry matter, fat, and total protein including casein), hygienic status (somatic cell count (SCC) and total microbial count (TMC)), and antioxidant activity (FRAP, DPPH, and ABTS assays). Pasteurized milk was used to manufacture natural yogurts with the use of starter cultures YC-X11 (Chr. Hansen, Hørsholm, Denmark). Changes in physicochemical traits (acidity, nutritional value, and water activity) and antioxidant activity (FRAP, DPPH, and ABTS assays) occurring during 21-day refrigerated storage of the yogurts were determined. The analyses revealed that the yogurts had higher antioxidant potential than the milk, irrespective of the determination method. Additionally, the experimental yogurts produced from milk obtained from the cows fed fodder supplemented with an herbal mixture exhibited significantly higher antioxidant activity than the control yogurts. The antioxidant potential of the yogurts changed during the refrigerated storage. It should be emphasized that their antioxidant activity significantly increased during the first two weeks (until day 14) but decreased by 15–20% in the following week. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Fermented Food Products II)
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13 pages, 285 KiB  
Article
Macronutrients, Amino and Fatty Acid Composition, Elements, and Toxins in High-Protein Powders of Crickets, Arthrospira, Single Cell Protein, Potato, and Rice as Potential Ingredients in Fermented Food Products
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(24), 12831; https://doi.org/10.3390/app122412831 - 14 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1670
Abstract
Due to the increasing global population and climate change, new sustainable food sources are being intensively sought to replace less favorable livestock production. Especially new protein sources and their food applications are being focused on. In this paper, several selected protein sources that [...] Read more.
Due to the increasing global population and climate change, new sustainable food sources are being intensively sought to replace less favorable livestock production. Especially new protein sources and their food applications are being focused on. In this paper, several selected protein sources that may have potential application in future functional foods, such as fermented foods, were examined and compared. These sources include single cell protein (SCP), Arthrospira platensis (Algae), Acheta domesticus (edible insect), potato, and rice protein. The above sources were compared to whey proteins. The parameters studied were total nutritional value, amino acid profile, fatty acid profile, the content of some elements, and the presence of toxins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Fermented Food Products II)
9 pages, 641 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Storage on Potentially Synbiotic Emulsion Spread Based on Milk Fat and Inulin
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(23), 12310; https://doi.org/10.3390/app122312310 - 01 Dec 2022
Viewed by 737
Abstract
The effect of four-week storage of milk fat–inulin emulsion as a product designed for spreading on bread was analysed. The emulsion contained 20% inulin, 20% milk fat, and 2% whey protein concentrate as an emulsifier. Salt (0.2%), β-carotene (0.04%), Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5, Streptococcus [...] Read more.
The effect of four-week storage of milk fat–inulin emulsion as a product designed for spreading on bread was analysed. The emulsion contained 20% inulin, 20% milk fat, and 2% whey protein concentrate as an emulsifier. Salt (0.2%), β-carotene (0.04%), Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5, Streptococcus thermophilus, as well as Bifidobacterium animalis BB-12 were also added. Rheological and textural analysis showed either no significant (p ≤ 0.05) or no substantial effects of storage on apparent viscosity, storage and loss modulus, hardness, cohesiveness, adhesiveness, and spreadability. The applied probiotic bacteria stayed alive at a level above 107 cfu/g during four-week storage, which is expected from a probiotic product. The whole time period of storage did not affect the chemical composition of the applied milk fat in the product. Sensory analysis showed that milk fat–inulin spread is acceptable and usually no different than commercial products, however, some off-taste and off-flavours were detected by panellists. In summary, a potentially pro-healthy product for spreading on bread was designed and studied. Besides the presence of fibre and health-promoting bacteria, the studied emulsion characterized a stable chemical composition and rheological as well as textural properties similar to commercial spreads. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Fermented Food Products II)
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