Advanced Assessment of Resilient Systems

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Civil Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 4811

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Dipartimento Economia e Tecnologia, Università di San Marino, Via Consiglio dei 60, n.99, 47899 Dogana, San Marino
Interests: earthquake engineering; resilience; numerical simulations; soil structure interaction; infrastructures
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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano, Italy
Interests: multiscale modeling and simulation of solids and structures; nonlinear dynamics of materials and structures; design and engineering of sustainable materials at multiple scales
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

New methodologies that apply resilience as a key concept in civil engineering have been recently proposed for the assessment of structural vulnerability. The recent advances in numerical simulations allow researchers to include the effects of resilience on the evaluation of the effects of natural hazards on civil systems such as buildings, bridges, roads and infrastructures. This call aims to bring together contributions from multiple disciplines to discuss the state of the art on numerical simulations to resilience sciences, sharing present and future perspectives.

Dr. Davide Forcellini
Prof. Dr. Fernando Fraternali       
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • resilience
  • structural vulnerability
  • numerical simulations
  • natural hazards
  • civil systems

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 6117 KiB  
Article
Using Friction-Yielding Damper CAR1 to Seismic Retrofit a Two-Story RC Building: Numerical Application
by Magdalini D. Titirla
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(3), 1527; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13031527 - 24 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1116
Abstract
In the present work attention is focused on the friction-yielding damper CAR1 (first prototype of Control-Absorb-Retain damper), which belongs to passive energy dissipation systems. This damper consists of very simple materials; it does not need to be accomplished in heavy industry so enables [...] Read more.
In the present work attention is focused on the friction-yielding damper CAR1 (first prototype of Control-Absorb-Retain damper), which belongs to passive energy dissipation systems. This damper consists of very simple materials; it does not need to be accomplished in heavy industry so enables its use in both developing and undeveloped countries. This paper presents and compares two alternative solutions with the use of the CAR1 to seismic retrofit an existing two-story reinforced-concrete (RC) structure with a moment-resisting frame located in Greece and constructed in 1979 and no longer meets the requirements of current anti-seismic regulations. A nonlinear static pushover analysis is performed to assess the performance of the framed building under different levels of shaking (“Life Safety” and “Collapse”). The pushover analysis is carried out in both the x and y directions. The use of damper CAR1 in seismic retrofitting not only provides a base shear load of up to 149.2% and 135.6% for the first and second redesign solutions but also protects steel diagonal braces from buckling. The appropriate characteristics of the dampers CAR1 has been selected from a wide variety of choices and the strengthening level can be easily adjusted or modified during the years based to the appropriate selection or modification of the number, the dimensions, and the elastoplastic properties of the blades. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Assessment of Resilient Systems)
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13 pages, 2039 KiB  
Article
SRRI Methodology to Quantify the Seismic Resilience of Road Infrastructures
by Davide Forcellini
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(18), 8945; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12188945 - 06 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 888
Abstract
The assessment of the seismic risk connected with the functionality of infrastructure has become an important issue in civil engineering, and consists of estimating costs due to earthquakes. In this regard, bridges are the most vulnerable systems among the various components of road [...] Read more.
The assessment of the seismic risk connected with the functionality of infrastructure has become an important issue in civil engineering, and consists of estimating costs due to earthquakes. In this regard, bridges are the most vulnerable systems among the various components of road infrastructure and the assessment of their resilience has recently been proposed. However, the development of methodologies that can assess the resilience of the full road infrastructure still constitutes a gap in the literature. This paper aims to fill this gap by proposing a novel methodology to include direct and indirect losses using a probability-based approach. A case study was carried out to investigate a road network consisting of two interdependent infrastructures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Assessment of Resilient Systems)
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13 pages, 1490 KiB  
Article
A Resilience-Based (RB) Methodology to Assess Resilience of Health System Infrastructures to Epidemic Crisis
by Davide Forcellini
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(6), 3032; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12063032 - 16 Mar 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1623
Abstract
The assessment of resilience of health infrastructures during an epidemic crisis is a fundamental issue in civil engineering, as shown by the recent COVID-19 crisis. During epidemic crises, health services and infrastructures need to maintain a level of functionality and avoid failures. In [...] Read more.
The assessment of resilience of health infrastructures during an epidemic crisis is a fundamental issue in civil engineering, as shown by the recent COVID-19 crisis. During epidemic crises, health services and infrastructures need to maintain a level of functionality and avoid failures. In addition, it is important to evaluate post-hazard procedures, such as emergency and recovery actions. In this regard, the paper applied resilience as a parameter to assess investments, countermeasures and mitigations. The Resilience-Based (RB) methodology herein proposed was then applied to quantify the resilience of health infrastructure systems by considering the recovery of four European Countries (Germany, France, United Kingdom and Italy) after the first wave of COVID-19. The results demonstrated that the resilience of health system infrastructures (HSI) depends significantly on the policies that every government management applied—these being ultimately responsible for the differences in respective COVID impacts. In particular, the principal advantage of using resilience lies in its readability by many stakeholders, such as health infrastructure managers, government owners and public authorities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Assessment of Resilient Systems)
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