New Insights into Natural Antioxidants in Foods: 2nd Edition

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2024 | Viewed by 1982

Special Issue Editor

Department of Food Quality and Safety Management, Poznań University of Life Sciences, ul. Wojska polskiego 28, 60-637 Poznań, Poland
Interests: natural antioxidants; phenolic compounds; quality of food; analytical methods for antioxidants; antioxidant status of food; oxidative stability; process optimization; design of experiment (DOE); response surface method
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The increasing awareness of consumers on the effect of food components on human health and increasing demands for innovations have led the food industry to change its strategy and offer allegedly “natural” and “clean label” products. These marketing catchwords are often used to describe food with naturally derived bioactive compounds, including natural antioxidants. Therefore, the efforts of scientists and the food industry have been focused on searching for new sources of natural antioxidants (mainly of plant origin) and new methods of incorporating antioxidant-active compounds into food. Natural antioxidants can easily minimize the addition of chemical preservatives to food. This approach has gained consumers’ acceptance, even though the sensory attributes of such “natural” food have changed in terms of sensory properties. Most natural antioxidants are derived from plant resources and include various compounds such as vitamins, polyphenols, phenolic acids, enzymes, and low-molecular antioxidants. However, “nature-origin” antioxidants are also obtained from the enzymatic hydrolysis of proteins (peptides). The broad range of natural antioxidant-active compounds results in various mechanisms of antioxidant action in food, such as free radical scavenging, scavenging of molecular oxygen, chelating transition metal ions, regeneration of other antioxidants (such as tocopherols), and, finally, the inhibition of pro-oxidant enzymes. Moreover, the final antioxidant effect in food is the result of various factors, such as the concentration of antioxidants, interaction with food constituents, mode of incorporation (direct or indirect) into food products, and storage conditions.

The aim of this Special Issue is to bring new insights into natural antioxidants in food in terms of new sources of these compounds, extraction and purification techniques from various materials, new application strategies in food (biofilms, nanocapsules, etc.), the interaction of natural antioxidants with other compounds in the food matrix (e.g., polyphenols–proteins interaction), and, finally, development of mathematical models for describing changes to the antioxidant activity of food products during storage.

The topic of natural antioxidants is gaining increasing interest among scientists and the food industry, so we invite you to participate in the second edition of the Special Issue. Researchers are encouraged to submit both original research and review articles that report results in the field of natural antioxidants in food.

Dr. Malgorzata Muzolf-Panek
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • natural antioxidants
  • antioxidant-activity
  • polyphenols
  • phenolic acids
  • food
  • quality
  • oxidative stability

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 284 KiB  
Article
The Identification of Polyphenolic Compounds and the Determination of Antioxidant Activity in Extracts and Infusions of Peppermint, Lemon Balm and Lavender
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 699; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14020699 - 14 Jan 2024
Viewed by 403
Abstract
Bioactive compounds are molecules that may have therapeutic potential with influence on oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory state and metabolic disorders. Herbs are recognized as a significant source of natural antioxidants. The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant properties of peppermint ( [...] Read more.
Bioactive compounds are molecules that may have therapeutic potential with influence on oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory state and metabolic disorders. Herbs are recognized as a significant source of natural antioxidants. The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant properties of peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) and lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.). Fresh plant materials were harvested and obtained from the Experimental Station of Agriculture University in Kraków, Poland. Proximate analysis (protein, fat, ash and dry matter) was performed on herbs. Total polyphenol content and polyphenol profile antioxidant activity (ABTS and FRAP methods) were measured in an extract prepared with deionized distilled hot water (infusion), 70% methanol or 70% methanol acidified with formic acid. It was found that the water extract of peppermint had the highest polyphenol content and antioxidant activity measured by the FRAP method. The highest antioxidant activity measured with the ABTS method was in methanolic lemon balm extract. The highest amount of total phenolic compound was determined in the water extract of peppermint. The water and acidified methanol extract of peppermint contained a higher amount of naringin, rutin, hesperidin and rosmarinic acid. Evaluated plants can be used as natural antioxidants instead of synthetic antioxidants in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Natural Antioxidants in Foods: 2nd Edition)
18 pages, 5588 KiB  
Article
Antioxidant and Biological Activities of Mahajanaka Mango Pulp Extract in Murine Models
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(22), 12216; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132212216 - 10 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Mahajanaka mango, a hybrid cultivar of Mangifera indica Linn., is a highly nutritional fruit that is popularly consumed in Thailand. It has been used in traditional medicine due to its abundance of phytonutrients. The present study aimed to investigate the chemical compositions and [...] Read more.
Mahajanaka mango, a hybrid cultivar of Mangifera indica Linn., is a highly nutritional fruit that is popularly consumed in Thailand. It has been used in traditional medicine due to its abundance of phytonutrients. The present study aimed to investigate the chemical compositions and antioxidant activity of Mahajanaka mango pulp extract (MPE) in vitro. Additionally, we examined its biological activities, including the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, gastroprotective, and hepatoprotective effects of MPE, in murine models. MPE exhibited high levels of phenolic compounds, mangiferin, β-carotene, and vitamin C, and it potentially showed antioxidant properties in an ABTS scavenging assay. The animal results have revealed that oral administration of MPE (1000 mg/kg body weight (BW)) significantly decreased acetic acid-induced writhing responses in mice. Interestingly, local applications of MPE at 1 mg/ear ameliorated ethyl phenylpropiolate (EPP)-induced ear edema, while gavage of MPE at 1000 mg/kg BW significantly decreased carrageenan-induced hind paw edema in rats. MPE can also protect against gastric ulcers induced by stress, hydrochloric acid/ethanol, and indomethacin in rats. Indeed, MPE (250 mg/kg BW) markedly lowered the level of serum alanine aminotransferase activity and hepatic lipid accumulation in rats with CCl4- and paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity. Taken together, the findings suggested that MPE exerts potent antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, gastroprotective, and hepatoprotective effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Natural Antioxidants in Foods: 2nd Edition)
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15 pages, 300 KiB  
Article
Fortification of Olive Oil with Herbs and Waste By-Products towards Sustainable Development: Total Antioxidant Capacity, Phenolic Content, and In Vitro Predicted Bioavailability
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(15), 8876; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13158876 - 01 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 819
Abstract
Nowadays, there is a high demand in many industrial countries for healthy foods and sustainable products and so to explore innovative food technologies, such as fortification with bioactive compounds such as antioxidants and polyphenols, that may be sourced from herbs or by-products. This [...] Read more.
Nowadays, there is a high demand in many industrial countries for healthy foods and sustainable products and so to explore innovative food technologies, such as fortification with bioactive compounds such as antioxidants and polyphenols, that may be sourced from herbs or by-products. This study’s objective was to explore the fortification of refined olive oils with natural bioactive compounds such as the herbs rosemary (Rosmarinus officinallis, L.), basil (Ocimum basillicum, L.), sage (Salvia officinalis, L.), lemon balm (Melissa oficinallis, L.), St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum, L.), pink savory (Satureja thymbra, L.), dittany (Origanum dictamnus, L.), and by-products such as pomace from olives, olive leaves (Olea europaea, L.), orange peel (Citrus aurantium, L.), lemon peel (Citrus limon, L.), pomegranate peel (Punica granatum, L.), and mandarin peel (Citrus reticulata). The fortification of the refined olive oils was performed with the use of different methodologies such as conventional maceration (CM), incubation shaking maceration (ISM), and ultrasound-assisted maceration (UAM). Folin–Ciocalteau (FOLIN) and Ferric-Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP) assays were used to measure their total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity. All methods demonstrated that the temperature, sample concentration, and time of maceration are considered of high importance in the fortification of refined olive oil. In vitro digestion process showed the bioavailability of the antioxidant and phenolic compounds in the fortified olive oil that ranged from 4.84% to 53.11%. Furthermore, the refined olive oils fortified with pomace, basil, St. John’s wort, and pomegranate peel presented the highest antioxidant and phenolic predicted bioavailability indices during the in vitro process compared to the control refined olive oil. Finally, fortification with natural herbs or by-products can be considered an innovative method for the enhancement of the nutritional value of refined olive oils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Natural Antioxidants in Foods: 2nd Edition)
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