Novel Approaches for Food Processing and Preservation

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 March 2024 | Viewed by 4762

Special Issue Editor

Department of Food Science and Technology, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Bellville 7535, South Africa
Interests: food science and technology; insect proteins; fermentation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The United Nations projects an increase in the world population to almost 10 billion by 2050. In addition, there is growing consumer demand for minimally processed food products, as well as growing demand for natural food additives. To meet the challenge of feeding the expanding world population, there is an explosion of alternative and sustainable food resources, particularly protein, ranging from valorisation of meat and fish protein to protein extraction from plant-based and insect sources for the production of meat and fish analogues. Natural food additives in high demand include colourants, preservatives (anti-microbial and antioxidants) and emulsifiers.

This Special Issue will cover the following areas, including, but not limited to: the use of pulsed-electric field (and other minimal processing techniques) to extract proteins, with a focus on sustainable sources, particularly plant-based and insect protein; natural food additives with a focus on emulsifiers, foaming agents and antioxidants.

Prof. Dr. Jessy Van Wyk
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • food processing
  • natural food additives
  • alternative food
  • protein extraction

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 7615 KiB  
Article
Development and Characterization of N/S-Carbon Quantum Dots by Valorizing Greek Crayfish Food Waste
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(15), 8730; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13158730 - 28 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1363
Abstract
The valorization of food industry byproducts has become a significant issue worldwide because of the drive towards a circular economy. The “zero waste target” in human activities seems to be a dominant objective in the design of future products by enterprises. In this [...] Read more.
The valorization of food industry byproducts has become a significant issue worldwide because of the drive towards a circular economy. The “zero waste target” in human activities seems to be a dominant objective in the design of future products by enterprises. In this work, food waste from the crayfish processing industry was converted into useful products (quantum dots), as nowadays, biowaste-derived materials tend to be more attractive than conventionally produced materials with a similar structure due to their lower production costs and environmentally friendly development processes. More specifically, shell waste from the crayfish industry was treated hydrothermally and, after a freeze-drying process, was transformed to useful quantum dots. Instrumental and chemical techniques, such as XRD, SEM-EDS, AFM, XPS, elemental analysis, fluorescence spectroscopy, TG, Microtox bioassay, and DPPH antioxidant activity, were employed to characterize the final product. The results indicated the existence of thermally stable spherical particles, with a diameter of 5–8 nm, which were mainly composed of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, calcium, and sulfur. Their external surface was rough and rich with various functional groups that further contributed to their overall optical properties. The final product presented low ecotoxicity, as studied by the Microtox assay. The superior antioxidant activity of this product compared to other similar materials reported elsewhere renders it a potential material for, e.g., food packaging applications. In addition, for the first time, N/S-Carbon QDs were applied as an antioxidant/antibacterial agent for strawberry preservation, showing promising results as the coated strawberries maintained their color and weight for three consecutive days with no mold growth observed on their surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Approaches for Food Processing and Preservation)
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12 pages, 2580 KiB  
Article
Evaporation Temperature Alters Physicochemical Characteristics and Volatile Maillard Reaction Products of Non-Centrifugal Cane Sugar (NCS): Comparison of Polyethylene Membrane and Retronasal Aroma Simulator Techniques for the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds in NCS
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 6402; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13116402 - 24 May 2023
Viewed by 969
Abstract
Non-centrifugal cane sugar (NCS) is produced from sugarcane syrup via thermal evaporation. This study aimed to assess the effects of different temperatures during the evaporation process on the physicochemical characteristics and Maillard reaction products (MRPs) of NCS. Evaporation was tested at three final [...] Read more.
Non-centrifugal cane sugar (NCS) is produced from sugarcane syrup via thermal evaporation. This study aimed to assess the effects of different temperatures during the evaporation process on the physicochemical characteristics and Maillard reaction products (MRPs) of NCS. Evaporation was tested at three final heating temperatures (120, 130, and 140 °C). The moisture content, water activity, L*a*b* color spaces, and ICUMSA (International Commission for Uniform Methods of Sugar Analysis) values of the NCS were determined. Volatile MRPs of NCS were extracted using polyethylene (PE) membrane and retronasal aroma simulator (RAS) techniques, and their components were measured using gas chromatography. A higher evaporation temperature produced NCS with less moisture content and water activity. However, it also led to a darker color, as indicated by lower L* (brightness) and b* (yellow) values in the color spaces. Additionally, higher evaporation temperatures resulted in greater ICUMSA values. Moreover, higher heating increased the amounts of volatile MRPs, such as 2,3-dihydro-3,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one, 2-furanmethanol, 2-methylpyrazine, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, and 2,6-dimethylpyrazine. Negative correlations were observed between moisture content, water activity, brightness, yellow color, and the total MRPs obtained by PE and RAS extractions. Additionally, positive and significant correlations were confirmed between ICUMSA values and most MRPs. Thus, the evaporation temperature alters the key physicochemical traits and volatile compounds of NCS, affecting its physical stability and flavor quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Approaches for Food Processing and Preservation)
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Review

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14 pages, 1963 KiB  
Review
Pre-Fermentative Cryogenic Treatments: The Effect on Aroma Compounds and Sensory Properties of Sauvignon Blanc and Chenin Blanc Wine—A Review
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 1483; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14041483 - 12 Feb 2024
Viewed by 522
Abstract
Low-temperature treatments preceding alcoholic fermentation are becoming increasingly popular and have been used in winemaking as a tool to improve wine colour, aroma, and quality. Additionally, the pre-fermentative treatment of grapes with cryogenic agents protects the grape juice (must) from oxidation by reducing [...] Read more.
Low-temperature treatments preceding alcoholic fermentation are becoming increasingly popular and have been used in winemaking as a tool to improve wine colour, aroma, and quality. Additionally, the pre-fermentative treatment of grapes with cryogenic agents protects the grape juice (must) from oxidation by reducing the diffusion of atmospheric oxygen into the liquid phase during the winemaking process. Resultant wines were reported to have enhanced varietal aromas, increased complexity, and higher thiol levels. Indications are that increased contact time between skin and juice improves the extraction of the compounds and/or precursors. Recently, there has been considerable interest in the production of wines with enhanced varietal aromas and improved quality by applying innovative winemaking technologies. This review aims to provide an overview of the aroma and organoleptic quality of Sauvignon blanc and Chenin blanc wines produced from grapes that were subjected to pre-fermentative cryogenic treatments including the impact aroma compounds, i.e., volatile thiols and methoxypyrazines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Approaches for Food Processing and Preservation)
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