Functional, Regional Foods and Herbal Plants: Technology, Properties and Cultural Tradition

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2025 | Viewed by 2679

Special Issue Editor

Department of Functional Food Products Development, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 50-375 Wrocław, Poland
Interests: new methods of food preservation; pulsed electric fields; microwave treatment; bioactive components; traditional and regional food; nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics; historical and modern eating habits
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Regional food is an increasingly important part of the food offered to customers. Its origin from the immediate vicinity has a positive impact on the economic sustainability of local supply chains and contributes to reducing the burden on the environment, also due to the shorter transport from the producer to the consumer. Functional food, on the other hand, owes its growing popularity to its chemical composition, which makes it possible to maintain human health prophylaxis at a higher level. Biologically active ingredients obtained from herbal plants can expand the functional food segment with new, valuable products.

This Special Issue of Applied Sciences on “Functional, Regional Foods and Herbal Plants: Technology, Properties and Cultural Tradition” aims to give an overview of the latest trends in the production of functional and regional food, also with the use of biologically active substances obtained from herbal plants.

We invite authors to contribute original research articles and review articles from different subfields of functional food, regional food and herbal plants. Papers may also refer to cultural traditions related to both food and herbal plants.

Dr. Maciej Oziembłowski
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • functional foods
  • regional foods
  • herbal plants
  • technology properties
  • cultural tradition

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

25 pages, 5884 KiB  
Article
An Investigation into the Mechanism of Alkaline Extraction-Isoelectric Point Precipitation (AE-IEP) of High-Thiol Plant Proteins
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 6469; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13116469 - 25 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1413
Abstract
Hempseed protein isolate (HPI) has drawn significant attention as a promising source of plant-based protein due to its high nutritional value. The poor functionality (e.g., solubility and emulsifying properties) of HPI has impeded its food application for years. This study provides important new [...] Read more.
Hempseed protein isolate (HPI) has drawn significant attention as a promising source of plant-based protein due to its high nutritional value. The poor functionality (e.g., solubility and emulsifying properties) of HPI has impeded its food application for years. This study provides important new information on hempseed protein extraction, which may provide further insights into the extraction of other high-thiol-based plant proteins to make valuable plant-based products with improved functional properties. In this study, HPI was produced from hempseed meals using the AE-IEP method. The underlying mechanisms and extraction kinetics were investigated under different experimental conditions (pH 9.0–12.0, temperature 24–70 °C, and time 0–120 min). The results suggested that disulphide bond formation is an inevitable side reaction during hempseed protein extraction and that the protein yield and the free -SH content can be influenced by different extraction conditions. A high solution pH and temperature, and long extraction time result in increased protein yield but incur the formation of more intermolecular disulphide bonds, which might be the reason for the poor functionality of the HPI. For instance, it was particularly observable that the protein solubility of HPI products reduced when the extraction pH was increased. The emulsifying properties and surface tension data demonstrated that the functionality of the extracted hempseed protein was significantly reduced at longer extraction times. A response surface methodology (RSM) optimization model was used to determine the conditions that could maximise HPI functionality. However, a three-fold reduction in protein yield must be sacrificed to obtain the protein with this high functionality. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 2884 KiB  
Article
Optimization of Chlorogenic Acid in Ethanol Extracts from Elderberry Flowers (Sambucus nigra L.) under Different Conditions: Response Surface Methodology
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(5), 3201; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13053201 - 02 Mar 2023
Viewed by 985
Abstract
The characteristics of elderberries and their flowers as well as selected properties of chlorogenic acid related to phenolic compounds are described. The aim of this study was to optimize the content of chlorogenic acid in ethanol extracts of elderberry flowers using the response [...] Read more.
The characteristics of elderberries and their flowers as well as selected properties of chlorogenic acid related to phenolic compounds are described. The aim of this study was to optimize the content of chlorogenic acid in ethanol extracts of elderberry flowers using the response surface methodology (RSM). The experiment was carried out with four research variants: fresh raw material treated with warm ethanol (50 °C) or cold ethanol (25 °C) and the same procedure for raw material that was frozen for a month and then dried. For each variant, nine methods of obtaining extracts were prepared using three different ethanol concentrations by volume (40, 68 or 95%) and three different extraction times (7, 20 or 30 days). Higher contents of chlorogenic acid were found in variants treated with warm ethanol (106.3 to 384.8 µg/cm3) in comparison to the samples treated with cold ethanol (60.77 to 298.3 µg/cm3). Optimization models of the response surface showed that with small losses of efficiency, the extraction process can be carried out for up to 20 days (instead of 30) with the use of ethanol with a concentration of approx. 68% (instead of 95%). The optimization of the efficiency of technological processes in the processing of herbs can be supported by the use of the response surface methodology. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop