Advances in Sports Training and Biomechanics

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 1203

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Neuromechanics, Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: the applied sport biomechanics and the effects of training on jump performance and in children

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Physical activity and sports training must be constantly evaluated in order to control their effectiveness. The development of athletes and their movement skills, motor abilities, and performance are assessed in training. For people who engage in various forms of physical activity recreationally, it is increasingly common to monitor the intensity and volume of their physical exertion in relation to health-related recommendations.

Sports biomechanics has proliferated in recent years due to the advancement of technology. Emerging technological developments enable us to not only measure motion but also the inertial forces of human movements in more practical settings. As a result, new areas, mainly related to the optimization of athletic performance and injury prevention, have emerged within sports biomechanics.

Sports biomechanics can be defined as the muscular, joint and skeletal actions of the body when executing a given task, skill and/or technique. Properly understanding biomechanics in relation to sports skill has a large impact on sports performance, rehabilitation, injury prevention and sport mastery.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to provide a platform for scholars to share their latest achievements in this field and provide current information on performance-related sport biomechanics research and training practice. Original articles, reviews or case reports can be submitted to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Fotini Arabatzi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomechanical analysis
  • injury biomechanics
  • joint biomechanics
  • sport science
  • motor skills
  • motor control
  • sports technique
  • kinematic
  • kinetic training proposal

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 4893 KiB  
Article
Measurement of the Impact Loads to Reduce Injuries in Acrobatic Gymnasts: Designing a Dedicated Platform
by Maria F. Paulino, Beatriz B. Gomes, Amílcar L. Ramalho and Ana M. Amaro
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(9), 3661; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14093661 - 25 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Background: The main objective of this study was the development of a specific load platform that would meet the needs of gymnasts and acrobatic coaches. This new platform has larger dimensions and is an identical structure to the plywood floor surface normally used; [...] Read more.
Background: The main objective of this study was the development of a specific load platform that would meet the needs of gymnasts and acrobatic coaches. This new platform has larger dimensions and is an identical structure to the plywood floor surface normally used; it was designed to make competitions with gymnasts safer and more like a real training situation. During a landing, there is high body stiffness, especially in the knees and ankles, which can cause injuries due to the number of repetitions performed in this gymnastics specialty. Methods: A group of 10 volunteers, with a mean age of 14.7 ± 2.4 years, performed at least 10 valid vertical jumps on each platform. Results: Despite being a preliminary study, this specific platform was shown to be more suitable for gymnastic use, compared to the industrial one, which represents a significant advantage for the modality. In fact, this platform is similar to the surface used for training and competition, allowing athletes to perform the jump in a similar way, and for the results to be replicable during the practice of the sport. The standard deviation values were lower, which shows that the new platform was more suitable for acrobatic gymnastics. Conclusions: As the maximum vertical load induced during landing after a jump has a significant effect on the likelihood of gymnasts suffering injuries, the development of a new load platform specifically for acrobatic gymnastics is clearly an improvement in this discipline. Knowledge of the load transmitted to the body can help coaches and athletes in defining training, and avoiding the possible occurrence of injuries. Therefore, it is necessary to use a platform that can accurately evaluate the load transmitted to the acrobatic gymnasts during real training and competition conditions, which is achieved with this new platform. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sports Training and Biomechanics)
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10 pages, 494 KiB  
Article
Acceleration Capacity and Vertical Jump Performance Relationship in Prepubertal Children
by Baptiste Chanel, Nicolas Babault and Carole Cometti
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(8), 3535; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14083535 - 22 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Sprint and jump abilities are considered basic skills that are regularly evaluated in training and school contexts. The correlations between these two skills have previously been established in adults and adolescents, but they have not been fully assessed in children. The present study [...] Read more.
Sprint and jump abilities are considered basic skills that are regularly evaluated in training and school contexts. The correlations between these two skills have previously been established in adults and adolescents, but they have not been fully assessed in children. The present study aimed to explore sprinting and jumping ability in prepubertal boys and girls. Thirty-one prepubertal individuals (aged 8–11 years) were assessed during sprinting for different distances (5, 10, and 20 m) and using different vertical and horizontal jump modalities (squat jump, countermovement jump, broad jump, and hop test). Correlations between the different results were tested. Strong correlations were found between vertical jump and sprint performances, especially over short distances. These results suggested that vertical jump tests are more sensitive than horizontal jumps to reveal acceleration capacity in children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sports Training and Biomechanics)
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