Recent Advancements in Biomarkers for Noncommunicable Diseases

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 May 2024 | Viewed by 822

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Medicine and Nutrigenomics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Medical University of Varna, 9000 Varna, Bulgaria
Interests: biomarkers; inflammation; oxidative stress; obesity; metabolic syndrome; cancer
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Guest Editor
1. Department of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Medical Faculty, Trakia University, Stara Zagora, Bulgaria
2. Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Medical University of Plovdiv, Plovdiv, Bulgaria
Interests: oncogenetics; biomarkers; COPD; bronchial asthma

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Noncommunicable diseases are believed to be the most common cause of death, among which cardiovascular diseases, cancer and diabetes are the most prominent. Impaired lipid profile, hyperglycemia, hypertension and obesity are associated with the development of metabolic syndrome, and the most common consequences of it are cardio-vascular diseases and type 2 diabetes, which can be related to multiple non-modifiable (age, gender, and genetic vulnerability) or modifiable risk factors, such as diet and lifestyle. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with an increased risk of malignancies. Establishing reliable molecular biomarkers for such pathologies is a challenge from both medicinal and pharmaceutical point of views.

This Special Issue aims to focus on the new advancements in the search of molecular biomarkers for noncommunicable diseases that will be vital for early detection, diagnostics, treatment and monitoring of diseases as well as for personalized and precision medicine. Identification of specific markers that correspond with certain lifestyles and the effectiveness of applied therapies of NCD patients are also of interest.

Dr. Yoana D. Kisselova-Kaneva
Dr. Tatyana Ivanova Vlaykova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • noncommunicable diseases
  • metabolic syndrome
  • obesity
  • cardiovascular diseases
  • dyslipidemia
  • cancer
  • autoimmune diseases
  • biomarkers

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

25 pages, 6549 KiB  
Article
Unveiling the Hidden Potential of Simple but Promising Blood Cell Parameters on Acute Myocardial Infarction Prognostication
by Cosmina Elena Jercălău, Cătălina Liliana Andrei, Lavinia Nicoleta Brezeanu, Roxana Oana Darabont, Suzana Guberna, Gabriela Postolea, Octavian Ceban and Crina Julieta Sinescu
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(6), 2545; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14062545 - 18 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Background: Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), a disease of mounting interest, continues to pose challenges and cast shadows of doubt on determining the optimal timing for revascularization. The current guidelines on NSTEMI recommend coronary angiography based on the GRACE score, emphasizing the critical need [...] Read more.
Background: Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), a disease of mounting interest, continues to pose challenges and cast shadows of doubt on determining the optimal timing for revascularization. The current guidelines on NSTEMI recommend coronary angiography based on the GRACE score, emphasizing the critical need for early invasive assessment (within 24 h); very-high-risk patients have to undergo this intervention even sooner, within 2 h. We believe that a reality check of these assumptions is needed and that we should endeavor to update these strategies using new predictive markers. Materials and methods: Our study included patients hospitalized for NSTEMI over the course of 16 months. Simple blood parameters, namely MCV (mean corpuscular volume), MPV (mean platelet volume), RDW (red blood cell distribution width), and PDW (platelet distribution width), were analyzed in correlation with the extent of the myocardial infarction area and with complications during hospitalization and at 30-day follow-up. Results: The parameters mentioned above have been identified as statistically relevant indicators of prognosis in patients with NSTEMI. Conclusions: In the present day, living in the world of the blue sky concept allows us to search for new diagnostic algorithms. Therefore, the combination of these parameters can constitute the DNA strands of a new and up-to-date score stratification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advancements in Biomarkers for Noncommunicable Diseases)
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