Processing, Preservation, and Quality Evaluation for Meat and Meat Products

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2024 | Viewed by 1334

Special Issue Editors

Department of Technique and Food Development, Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 159c Street, 32, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: non-thermal atmospheric plasma; alternative curing methods; unconventional methods of extending food quality; food packaging and storage with particular emphasis on edible coatings and films; quality of meat and meat products; enzymes in food design and production
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Technique and Food Development, Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 159c Street, 32, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: influence of technological processes on the quality of food products; designing innovative food products; products of animal origin and their analogues
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Technique and Food Development, Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 159c Street, 32, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: analysis of volatile compound profiles in raw and final products using electronic nose; exploring the use of electronic nose to analyze the volatile compounds present in various animal-derived products such as meat, plant and dairy; influence of technological processes and srorage on aroma profile of food
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue titled 'Processing, Preservation and Quality Assessment of Meat and Meat Products' aims to comprehensively elaborate on the innovative techniques and methods employed in the processing and preservation of various meat products, including an assessment of their overall quality. Manuscripts focusing on innovative preservation methods to prolong shelf life and enhance the flavor of meat and meat products are highly desired. Additionally, studies pertaining to environmentally friendly processes that convert meat into products characterized by both safety and high nutritional value are also welcome. Product quality assessment may encompass physicochemical and microbiological analyses, as well as evaluations of consumer acceptance.

This Special Issue is designed to aid food scientists and technologists in developing a diverse range of high-quality meat products that align with consumer preferences and market demands.

Dr. Monika Marcinkowska-Lesiak
Prof. Dr. Andrzej Półtorak
Dr. Iwona Wojtasik-Kalinowska
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • meat processing
  • preservation techniques
  • quality evaluation
  • curing
  • smoking
  • shelf life extension
  • safety
  • physicochemical analysis of meat and meat products
  • aroma assessment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 1628 KiB  
Article
Influence of Nigella sativa L. Oil Addition on Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Freezer-Stored Ground Pork for Pâté
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(23), 12550; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132312550 - 21 Nov 2023
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Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Nigella sativa L. (NS) oil addition on the quality of ground pork for pâté stored for one month and two months (−20 ± 1 °C). The study was conducted on a negative [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Nigella sativa L. (NS) oil addition on the quality of ground pork for pâté stored for one month and two months (−20 ± 1 °C). The study was conducted on a negative control (C), a positive control with the addition of antioxidant (CB) butylated hydroxyanisole (E320), and two groups with the addition of NS oil at the level of 1.9% (O1) and 3.8% (O2). The quality parameters tested in the meat were colour (measured in the CIELab system), lipid oxidation products, the fatty acid profile, thrombogenicity (T1), atherogenicity (A1), and the ratio of hypocholesterolemia to hypercholesterolemia (h/H). After roasting the pâtés, their volatile compound profiles were studied and sensory tests were conducted. A significant effect of NS oil additive on meat colour was found and ΔE for C-O2 increased faster during storage than for C-O1 and C-CB. NS oil additive in pork pâté improved the fatty acid profile. Significant differences in the rate of the fatty acid profile change during storage were observed with the addition of 3.8% NS oil compared to the other groups. Only the O2 group showed no change in PUFA content, while the h/H ratio was approximately 20% higher in the groups with added oil. The addition of NS oil also slowed the growth of TBARSs compared to the C and CB groups. The volatile compound profile of the raw pâté was most influenced by the proportion of terpenes in the NS oil. After two months of meat storage, the O1 pâté received the highest sensory ratings. Full article
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11 pages, 938 KiB  
Communication
Correlation between Biogenic Amines and Their Precursors in Stored Chicken Meat
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(22), 12230; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132212230 - 10 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Biogenic amines (BAs) are biologically active substances found in the cells of microorganisms, plants, and animals. These BAs serve many vital functions in the body. However, an excessive amount can be toxic, especially for individuals taking monoamine oxidase (MAO) and diamine oxidase (DAO) [...] Read more.
Biogenic amines (BAs) are biologically active substances found in the cells of microorganisms, plants, and animals. These BAs serve many vital functions in the body. However, an excessive amount can be toxic, especially for individuals taking monoamine oxidase (MAO) and diamine oxidase (DAO) inhibitors. They primarily form in products rich in amino acids, the primary substrates for BA formation. The aim of this study was to determine the formation of BAs and their precursor amino acids in chicken breast and leg muscles stored under chilling conditions. Analyses of BA and AA determinations were conducted on days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 of muscle storage. There was a noted increase in BAs with the storage of both muscle types (p < 0.05). Distinct levels of BAs were detected (p < 0.05) in the muscles, except for putrescine (p > 0.05). Interactions emerged between the two factors for various Bas, including histamine (p = 0.001), tyramine (p < 0.001), BAI index (p < 0.001), tryptamine (p < 0.001), agmatine (p = 0.001), spermidine (p < 0.001), TOTAL BA-1 (p < 0.001), and TOTAL BA-2 (p = 0.016). There was no evident interaction between the type of meat and storage time concerning amino acid content (p > 0.05). Correlations in breast muscles were observed for biogenic amine–amino acid pairs such as putrescine–ornithine (r = −0.57) (p < 0.05), spermidine–ornithine (r = −0.73) (p < 0.05), and phenylethylamine–phenylethylalanine (r = −0.50) (p < 0.05). In leg muscles, significant correlations were found for histamine–histidine (r = −0.87) (p < 0.05), putrescine–ornithine (r = −0.96) (p < 0.05), and phenylethylamine–phenylethylalanine (r = −0.65) (p < 0.05). The results obtained can be used in the future to estimate the levels of BAs with knowledge of the levels of individual amino acids and inversely. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Qualitative parameters of pork and beef subcutaneous fat treated with non-thermal plasma jet operated in nitrogen
Authors: Monika Marcinkowska-Lesiak
Affiliation: Department of Technique and Food Development, Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 159c Street, 32, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland

Title: The Influence of Cooking Methods and muscle types on Beef Aroma Profile and Consumer Satisfaction: Insights from Volatile Compound Analysis
Authors: Iwona Wojtasik-Kalinowska
Affiliation: Department of Technique and Food Development, Institute of Human Nutrition Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 159c Street, 32, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
Abstract: The objective of this study is to determine the effect of two distinct cooking techniques, namely roasting and stewing, on the formation of volatile compounds in various beef muscles (Semimembranosus, Biceps femoris, Rectus femoris), while also evaluating consumer acceptance. The research employs the concept of volatile "marker" compounds to discern the influence of cooking techniques on the flavor profile of beef. While no statistically significant differences were observed in consumer evaluations between the two cooking methods, notable disparities emerged in consumer assessments of specific muscle cuts. Notably, the Rectus femoris muscle received the highest ratings (P<0.05) among other evaluated muscles . Hexanal and pentanal emerged as characteristic volatile compounds associated with the stewing cooking technique, suggesting their potential as markers for lipid oxidation. The utilization of Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME) and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) methods for the analysis of volatile "marker" compounds in beef proved effective in highlighting significant differences in flavor compound classes between muscles and cooking methods. These findings illustrate alterations in flavor-forming reaction pathways and offer insights into the nuanced distinctions in consumer-perceived flavor preferences.

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