Mechanical Behavior of Steels

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanical Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 November 2023) | Viewed by 2221

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: structural integrity; fatigue; fracture mechanics; finite element method; fiber-reinforced composites; environmental effects; additive manufacturing
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E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, 00184 Rome, Italy
Interests: fatigue and fracture behavior of materials; mechanical characterization; structural integrity of conventional and innovative materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Coimbra, 3030788 Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: fatigue; fatigue crack growth; low cycle fatigue; mechanical properties; welding; friction stir processing; friction stir welding; additive manufacturing; failure analysis; mechanical design; corrosion fatigue; fracture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Steels are the most widely used metal materials and play an important role in the modern automotive and rail industries. In these industries, components are usually subjected to severe service conditions. Thus, superior mechanical properties are of major engineering significance.

This Special Issue aims to cover the recent research progress in the field of steels. It is focused on, but not limited to, original contributions dealing with microstructure characterization, advanced processing techniques, heat treatment routes, environmental effects, and structural integrity assessment, including fatigue and fracture. Examples of innovative industrial applications are also encouraged. Both experimental and numerical approaches are welcome.

Dr. Ricardo Branco
Prof. Dr. Filippo Berto
Dr. Joel De Jesus
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • advanced high-strength steels
  • complex-phase steels
  • transformation-induced plasticity steels
  • bainitic steels

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 4184 KiB  
Article
Effects of Loading Modes on Fatigue Limit Estimation in Terms of Rotating Bending Fatigue and Rate Process Theory
by Mai Fukami, Noriyasu Oguma, Benjamin Guennec, Noriyo Horikawa and Tatsuo Sakai
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 477; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14020477 - 05 Jan 2024
Viewed by 512
Abstract
In this study, the influence of loading modes on the fatigue limit estimation of low-to-medium-carbon steels was modeled in terms of the rate process theory proposed by Guennec et al. The axial loading model established in terms of the rate process theory has [...] Read more.
In this study, the influence of loading modes on the fatigue limit estimation of low-to-medium-carbon steels was modeled in terms of the rate process theory proposed by Guennec et al. The axial loading model established in terms of the rate process theory has been shown to be effective for axial loading fatigue, but its applicability to rotating bending fatigue is uncertain. Therefore, low- and medium-carbon steels were tested for rotating bending fatigue, and the fatigue limits obtained were compared with those estimated by the axial loading model established in terms of the rate process theory. However, since the model could not be applied, we propose a new model in which the material parameters of an estimation equation established in terms of the rate process theory are expressed based on Vickers hardness, which was introduced to improve the usability of the model. It was found that there was a discrepancy between the axial load fatigue limit and the rotating bending fatigue limit due to the effect of the loading mode. To solve this discrepancy, the stress index was introduced into the model. The proposed model provides a method for estimating the frequency-dependent fatigue limits for different loading modes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanical Behavior of Steels)
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29 pages, 5291 KiB  
Article
Buckling Resistance of Tapered Steel Columns
by Tihomir Dokšanović, Ivan Radić and Bojan Biserčić
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(20), 11498; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132011498 - 20 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1224
Abstract
Tapered steel members are widely used in structural and architectural engineering for their efficiency and adaptability, allowing for optimal material usage tailored to specific load levels. However, their complex stability characteristics have hindered their representation in modern design standards like EN 1993 and [...] Read more.
Tapered steel members are widely used in structural and architectural engineering for their efficiency and adaptability, allowing for optimal material usage tailored to specific load levels. However, their complex stability characteristics have hindered their representation in modern design standards like EN 1993 and AISC 360. Existing buckling solutions are limited, and practical research is lacking. This paper comprehensively examines the buckling resistance calculation methodologies for members with variable cross-sections, addressing discrepancies across the methodologies, particularly regarding the tapering ratio. A parametric analysis and numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate each methodology’s applicability, emphasizing the need to balance computational simplicity and accuracy. The study primarily focused on tapered steel beams, considering the different tapering ratios and loading conditions. The findings provide valuable insights into the buckling behavior in tapered members and the practical implications for real-world structural designs. By examining the available analytical methods for calculating the buckling resistance of tapered elements, a better understanding of how to accommodate the non-uniformity of a member was gained, enabling an overview of the variance in the determined resistances and an assessment of the method’s applicability. Moreover, specific calculation methodologies were found to have shortcomings that require modifications for a more accurate parametric analysis. This research contributes to the field by bridging the gaps in modern design standards and enhancing the understanding of buckling in tapered steel members. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanical Behavior of Steels)
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