applsci-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Developments in Heat Transfer

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 March 2024) | Viewed by 2590

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Energy, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino, Italy
Interests: computational fluid dynamics; component interaction; gas turbine cooling; pumps and compressors; uncertainty quantification
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Worldwide regulations in the energy production and management field are thrusting the industry towards a reduction in pollutant emissions as part of the necessary strategy aimed at limiting the overall increase in the world’s temperature by 1.5°C, as per the Paris Agreement in 2015. To comply with the stringent limitations defined by lawmakers, researchers in the energy engineering field are continuously working to improve machines’ efficiency and to avoid energy waste. Amongst the fields of research associated with this topic, the design of heat exchangers, the thermal management of powertrains, and the design of innovative turbomachinery components play the most prominent role and contribute to defining ‘heat transfer’ as a pillar for future technologies and applications.

Additive manufacturing enables the creation of ultra-efficient and compact heat exchangers that are necessary to reduce the weight of power systems. Moreover, it entitles manufacturers to investigate innovative design solutions for specific components to improve the efficiency of the heat transfer, thus, enhancing the plant efficiency. Machine learning is currently used to define optimal strategies for the optimization of the powertrain thermal management and for the efficient exploitation of the on-board power energy sources. Specific attention is also paid to the battery management system (BMS) to achieve an efficient control of the thermal state of the battery. The latter would in fact impair the battery’s state of health and impact its residual life, thus, affecting the so-called range anxiety. Finally, optimization methods would also be coupled to high-fidelity methods in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to attain an efficient design of the cooling systems for combustors and turbines, including component interaction issues and acknowledging the tendency to move towards pressuregain cycles. Once more, additive manufacturing would represent an enabling technology to achieve such goals.

This Special Issue encourages researchers working in those fields to share their latest developments in heat transfer analysis, modelling, and simulation. Specific topics of interest for publication include the vehicular, aerospace and power generation applications of the following:

  • Data-driven heat transfer models.
  • Model-based heat transfer models.
  • Hybrid heat transfer models.
  • Data-driven physics-informed AI (artificial intelligence) models.
  • Experimental methods for heat transfer analysis.
  • Numerical methods for heat transfer simulation.
  • Unsteady heat transfer in turbomachinery
  • Cooling strategies for next-gen aero-engine components.

Dr. Daniela Anna Misul
Dr. Simone Salvadori
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • heat transfer
  • vehicular applications
  • turbomachinery
  • power generation
  • propulsion
  • aerospace
  • film cooling
  • computational fluid dynamics
  • heat exchangers
  • applied thermal engineering
  • turbulence modelling

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

20 pages, 1791 KiB  
Article
Experimental Assessment of Correlative Approaches for the Prediction of Leakage Flow through Labyrinth Seals
by Niccolò Castelli, Tommaso Bacci, Alessio Picchi, Lorenzo Winchler and Bruno Facchini
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 6863; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13126863 - 6 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1009
Abstract
Simple analytical models can be employed to estimate the leakage mass flow rate from labyrinth seals, resulting in a quick procedure, well suited for the early design process. Different formulas were proposed by many authors during the past decades and most of them [...] Read more.
Simple analytical models can be employed to estimate the leakage mass flow rate from labyrinth seals, resulting in a quick procedure, well suited for the early design process. Different formulas were proposed by many authors during the past decades and most of them employ a carry-over factor and a flow coefficient to predict the mass flow rate across the clearance area. The present work aims to compare the analytical prediction with the results of an experimental campaign. The experimental results were retrieved from a dedicated test rig for both a straight-through and a stepped labyrinth seal. Hence, for each seal, the effect of the clearance size, the Reynolds number and the pressure ratio has been investigated. Starting from the experimental required inputs, six different correlations are considered, with both direct and indirect methods. The results are shown as a function of pressure ratio and clearance gap. Despite some differences in the comparison, and most of the used correlation underestimate the measured mass flow rate, some general trends and guidelines can be highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Heat Transfer)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 8020 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Upstream Turbulence Impact on Wall Heat Transfer in an Acoustic Liner with Large-Eddy Simulations
by Soizic Esnault, Florent Duchaine, Laurent Y. M. Gicquel and Stéphane Moreau
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(5), 3145; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13053145 - 28 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1087
Abstract
Acoustic liners of aircraft fan ducts generate synthetic jets that interact with the boundary layer of the incident grazing flow. Such an interaction leads to complex wall heat transfer, which has been scarcely studied. The objective of the present work is to evaluate [...] Read more.
Acoustic liners of aircraft fan ducts generate synthetic jets that interact with the boundary layer of the incident grazing flow. Such an interaction leads to complex wall heat transfer, which has been scarcely studied. The objective of the present work is to evaluate the flow dynamics and the heat transfer mechanisms that occur in acoustic liners by the use of Large-Eddy Simulations. To do so, two configurations, linked by a principle of similarity, are considered: a lab-scale one, for which dimensions have been multiplied by a factor of 6.25 to ease measurements, and an engine-scale configuration. The lab-scale configuration is used to validate the numerical methodology and, although some limitations are pointed out, the similitude is validated. As a main outcome of these detailed simulations, synthetic jets are found to completely drive the flow dynamics in the jet wakes. Upstream turbulence is also shown to impact the development of the first jet rows as well as the wall heat transfer between jets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Developments in Heat Transfer)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop