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Novel Technologies for Wastewater Treatment and Reuse

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Physics General".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2024) | Viewed by 6049

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Dipartimeto di Scienze e Tecnologie Ambientali Biologiche e Farmaceutiche (DISTABIF), Università degli Studi della Campania - Luigi Vanvitelli, 81100 Caserta, Italy
Interests: waste water; life cycle assessment; archaeological; cultural heritage; climate
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Guest Editor
Dipartimeto di Scienze e Tecnologie Ambientali Biologiche e Farmaceutiche (DISTABIF), Università degli Studi della Campania - Luigi Vanvitelli, 81100 Caserta, Italy
Interests: wastewater treatment; microalgae; biorecovery; stable isotopes; cultural heritage

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wastewater, whether from domestic or industrial sources, provides an outstanding reservoir for the recovery of valuable nutrients and high-value inorganic elements, which are still too often largely wasted by those industrial processes that are currently well established from a technological point of view, and hence widespread worldwide. Nonetheless, the massive increase in world population occurred during the last few decades induced an increase in the quantity and quality of wastewater globally generated; as a consequence, the treatment of these effluents needs to meet increasingly stringent quality criteria aimed at minimizing the sanitary and environmental risk for receiving water bodies and habitats.

Therefore, in recent years, all those approaches that are focused on optimizing wastewater purification processes, prioritizing circular economy policies, are gaining more and more scientific relevance.

Indeed, this Special Issue will address the most recent innovative and sustainable proposals dealing not only with proper experimental processes, but also with methodological advances that may result in a wastewater valorization and an optimization of wastewater treatment processes from both an energetic and an environmental point of view.

Prof. Dr. Carmine Lubritto
Dr. Maria Rosa Di Cicco
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

20 pages, 1378 KiB  
Review
Role of White Rot Fungi in Industrial Wastewater Treatment: A Review
by Waqas Latif, Claudia Ciniglia, Manuela Iovinella, Muhammad Shafiq and Stefania Papa
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(14), 8318; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13148318 - 18 Jul 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3143
Abstract
White Rot Fungi (WRF) are a class of microorganisms widely understood for their ability to breakdown an extensive range of pollutants generally found in industrial wastewater. This specific literature review centers on the abilities of the White Rot Fungi to treat industrial wastewater, [...] Read more.
White Rot Fungi (WRF) are a class of microorganisms widely understood for their ability to breakdown an extensive range of pollutants generally found in industrial wastewater. This specific literature review centers on the abilities of the White Rot Fungi to treat industrial wastewater, analysis of the biodegradation mechanism, future applications, and scaling up for practical implementation. WRF usually carry out the degradation process with ligninolytic enzyme by targeting complex industrial pollutants, such as aromatic hydrocarbons, dyes, pharmaceuticals, and products of personal care. The unique enzymatic system of WRF converts the complex and harmful industrial pollutants into harmless end and byproducts, thus minimizing the impact on the environment and ecosystem. This review paper also discusses the potential applications of WRF, such as bioremediation, biosorption, and co-culturing with bacteria to enhance the pollutants removal efficiency of already functional wastewater treatment plants. However, there are still challenges in scaling up WRF-based treatment facilities due to factors such as the optimization of conditions and processes of already functional conventional wastewater treatment plants, cost effectiveness, and design modifications of treatment facilities. Conclusively, WRF fungi can play an important role in degrading complex organic and inorganic pollutants specifically, which are not usually treated by conventional wastewater treatment plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Technologies for Wastewater Treatment and Reuse)
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20 pages, 745 KiB  
Review
Constructed Wetlands for the Wastewater Treatment: A Review of Italian Case Studies
by Berhan Retta, Elio Coppola, Claudia Ciniglia and Eleonora Grilli
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(10), 6211; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13106211 - 18 May 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2524
Abstract
Wastewater is one of the major sources of pollution in aquatic environments and its treatment is crucial to reduce risk and increase clean water availability. Constructed wetlands (CWs) are one of the most efficient, environmentally friendly, and less costly techniques for this purpose. [...] Read more.
Wastewater is one of the major sources of pollution in aquatic environments and its treatment is crucial to reduce risk and increase clean water availability. Constructed wetlands (CWs) are one of the most efficient, environmentally friendly, and less costly techniques for this purpose. This review aims to assess the state of the art on the use of CWs in removing environmental pollutants from wastewater in Italy in order to improve the current situation and provide background for future research and development work. To evaluate the CWs performances, 76 research works (2001–2023) were examined, and the parameters considered were the type of wastewater treated, pollutants removed, macrophytes, and the kinds of CWs utilized. The pollutant removal efficiencies of all CWs reviewed showed remarkable potential, even though there are biotic and abiotic factor-driven performance variations among them. The number of articles published showed an increasing trend over time, indicating the research progress of the application of CWs in wastewater treatment. This review highlighted that most of the investigated case studies referred to pilot CWs. This finding suggests that much more large-scale experiments should be conducted in the future to confirm the potential of CWs in eliminating pollutants from wastewater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Technologies for Wastewater Treatment and Reuse)
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