Spectroscopy in Food Science and Engineering

A special issue of AppliedChem (ISSN 2673-9623).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 5697

Special Issue Editors

Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio Coppito, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
Interests: chemometrics; food analysis; data-fusion; spectroscopy; chromatography classification; analytical chemistry; environmental chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the advancement of novel technologies, the link between food analysis and engineering is increasingly stringent. A constantly growing number of highly-performant devices and new analytical methodologies are developed to boost productivity in the food sector and to enhance the quality control on these products. In recent years, developing smart tools to be used for food analysis, the bull’s eye is on spectroscopy because it provides a number of benefits under different standpoints. In this perspective, chemometrics plays a key role in joining these fields of science and making the analysis of the complex outcome produced by the new technologies possible.

We are pleased to invite you to contribute with your valuable work to this Special Issue on “Spectroscopy in Food Science and Engineering”.

This Special Issue aims to collect papers focused on developing novel chemometric/deep learning technologies/analytical methodologies suitable for the analysis of foodstuff. In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. In the field of food analysis, research areas may include the following:

  • Chemometrics;
  • Deep learning;
  • Spectroscopy;
  • Fraud detection;
  • Authentication/characterization.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Alessandra Biancolillo
Dr. Martina Foschi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. AppliedChem is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food analysis
  • spectroscopy
  • chemometrics
  • fraud detection
  • traceability
  • authentication

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 2078 KiB  
Article
Manifestation of Heat-Induced Valuable Dietary Nucleotide Salvage in Food Prepared from Aged Fish in Fast Protein and Metabolites Liquid Chromatography, ATP-Bioluminescence Assay, and NMR Spectra
AppliedChem 2023, 3(2), 334-349; https://doi.org/10.3390/appliedchem3020021 - 20 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1300
Abstract
Dietary nucleotides and nucleosides, primarily inosine monophosphate (IMP) and the adenine nucleotide pool (ANP), are widely considered as essential nutrients responsible for multiple biological functions. Food prepared from meat and fish is the main source of these substances in the human diet, and [...] Read more.
Dietary nucleotides and nucleosides, primarily inosine monophosphate (IMP) and the adenine nucleotide pool (ANP), are widely considered as essential nutrients responsible for multiple biological functions. Food prepared from meat and fish is the main source of these substances in the human diet, and it is extremely important to implement storage and processing techniques ensuring their maximum preservation and even accumulation during maturation or conditioning. In experiments with freshly refrigerated grass carp and defrosted Alaska pollock fillets it was discovered, initially using Fast Protein and Metabolites Liquid Chromatography and the ATP-bioluminescence test, and afterwards validated by NMR spectroscopy, that heat treatment identical to conventional culinary processing in aqueous or wet media at temperatures above 62 °C leads to nucleotide salvage (recovery) in aged fish. A significant increase in the concentration of IMP, and even an emergence of ANP substances, were reliably demonstrated in fish samples which had already partially or fully lost these components during prolonged storage due to the ATP breakdown metabolic reactions. Owing to this recovery, the nutritive value of ready-to-eat food can be higher than was initially evaluated in raw products before heat treatment: an effect that should certainly be considered in practical nutrition. Moreover, it is necessary to reconsider the widely acknowledged system of indices of freshness based on nucleotides and nucleosides elaborated a long time ago for raw meat and fish products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopy in Food Science and Engineering)
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11 pages, 1689 KiB  
Article
Predicting Animal Welfare Labels from Pork Fat Using Raman Spectroscopy and Chemometrics
AppliedChem 2023, 3(2), 279-289; https://doi.org/10.3390/appliedchem3020017 - 17 May 2023
Viewed by 1447
Abstract
The awareness of the origin of meat that people consume is rapidly increasing today and with that increases the demand for fast and accurate methods for its distinction. In this work, we present for the first time the application of Raman spectroscopy using [...] Read more.
The awareness of the origin of meat that people consume is rapidly increasing today and with that increases the demand for fast and accurate methods for its distinction. In this work, we present for the first time the application of Raman spectroscopy using a portable spectrometer for the classification of pork. Breeding conditions were distinguished from spectral differences of adipose tissues. The pork samples were obtained from Dutch vendors, from supermarkets with quality marks of 1 and 3 stars, and from a local butcher shop. In total, 60 fat samples were examined using a fiber-optic-coupled Raman spectrometer. Recorded spectra were preprocessed before being subjected to multivariate statistical analysis. An initial data exploration using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) revealed a separation of adipose tissue samples between the lower supermarket quality grade and the samples from the local butcher. Moreover, predictive modeling using Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) resulted in 96.67% classification accuracy for all three sources, demonstrating the suitability of the presented method for intraspecies meat classification and the potential on-site use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopy in Food Science and Engineering)
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11 pages, 4475 KiB  
Article
Improvements in the Robustness of Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy Models against Chemical Interferences: Application to Monitoring of Anaerobic Digestion Processes
AppliedChem 2022, 2(2), 117-127; https://doi.org/10.3390/appliedchem2020008 - 20 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1683
Abstract
The monitoring and control of bioprocesses rely on the measurement of the main metabolite concentrations. To this end, infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a good candidate with which to perform rapid and non-destructive measurements. However, IR-based measurements rely on a calibration step linking the [...] Read more.
The monitoring and control of bioprocesses rely on the measurement of the main metabolite concentrations. To this end, infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a good candidate with which to perform rapid and non-destructive measurements. However, IR-based measurements rely on a calibration step linking the measured spectra to the concentrations of the compounds of interest. This calibration may suffer with problems of robustness when the measuring conditions change, such as when some chemicals not present in the calibration spectra are added when using the IR sensor. In this study, a method based on orthogonal projection, dynamic orthogonal projection (DOP), was tested for its ability to cope with the robustness problem caused by the addition of ammonia in a pilot-scale anaerobic digester, whose volatile fatty acid concentrations were monitored by mid-IR spectrometry. The results demonstrate that DOP has significant potential as a form of process analytical technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spectroscopy in Food Science and Engineering)
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