Nanomaterial Synthesis and Processing for Advanced Applications

A special issue of AppliedChem (ISSN 2673-9623).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 1173

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Hydrogen Energy Technology Laboratory, Korea Institute of Energy Technology (KENTECH), 200 Hyeoksin-ro, Naju, Jeonnam 58330, Republic of Korea
Interests: electrochemistry; catalysis; nanomaterials synthesis for energy application

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Guest Editor
Hydrogen Energy Technology Laboratory, Korea Institute of Energy Technology (KENTECH), 200 Hyeoksin-ro, Naju, Jeonnam 58330, Republic of Korea
Interests: photo/electrochemical energy storage and conversion
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Electrochemistry has emerged as a powerful tool for addressing critical challenges in the energy, environment, and health sectors. Recent progress in the field showcases how innovative solutions, particularly those focused on nanomaterial synthesis and processing, are effectively overcoming obstacles. By leveraging electron transfer principles at interfaces, electrochemical technologies offer promising opportunities for sustainable energy conversion and storage, environmental remediation, and healthcare diagnostics. In energy applications, electrochemistry plays a pivotal role in developing high-performance energy storage systems and efficient energy conversion devices. Researchers are exploring novel nanostructured electrode materials, such as transition metal oxides, sulfides, and carbon-based materials, to enhance electrochemical performance and stability. Advanced nanomaterial synthesis and processing techniques, including sol–gel and hydrothermal methods, enable tailored electrode materials with improved electrocatalytic activity and cost-effectiveness. These advancements enable integration with renewable energy sources, facilitating the conversion of intermittent power and promoting grid-scale energy storage for a cleaner and sustainable future.

Electrochemical technologies also address environmental challenges by providing effective solutions for pollution mitigation and sustainable resource utilization. Nanomaterial synthesis and processing techniques are used to design electrodes with enhanced performance for electrochemical wastewater treatment. Electrocoagulation, electrooxidation, and electrochemical membrane separation, coupled with advanced electrode materials, efficiently remove organic pollutants, heavy metals, and emerging contaminants. Nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors and biosensors enable real-time monitoring of water and air quality, enabling the early detection of contaminants and interventions for pollution control. In healthcare, nanomaterials and electrochemistry play vital roles in diagnostics and personalized medicine. Nanomaterial-based electrochemical biosensors enable sensitive and selective detection of biomarkers, facilitating rapid and accurate disease diagnosis. Precise control of nanomaterial synthesis and surface functionalization optimizes biosensor performance for specific analytes. Miniaturized electrochemical devices, enabled by nanotechnology and microfluidics, allow for portable and point-of-care diagnostic platforms, enabling early disease detection, therapeutic monitoring, and personalized treatment strategies. To fully harness the potential of electrochemistry in energy, environment, and health, the development of advanced electrode materials with tailored nanomaterial properties is crucial. Interdisciplinary approaches integrating materials science, engineering, and computational modeling are necessary for designing and optimizing electrochemical devices and systems. Collaboration between academia, industry, and government can accelerate the translation of research findings into practical applications, driving advancements in electrochemistry for sustainable energy, environmental remediation, and healthcare diagnostics. This interdisciplinary field holds great promise for shaping a cleaner, healthier, and more sustainable future.

This Special Issue aims to review advances in nanomaterial synthesis and processing for advanced applications in the field of energy, environment, and health, as well as pave the way for future trends in this research field. Original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Electrochemical water splitting;
  • Lithium-ion batteries;
  • Zinc–air batteries;
  • Hydrogen production by the photoelectrochemical method;
  • Nitrogen, nitrate, and CO2 reduction reactions;
  • Advancing environmental sensing and disaster response;
  • Enhancing disaster response and environmental monitoring in coastal regions;
  • Smart sensing solutions;
  • Advancements in health monitoring: from wearables to integrated monitoring systems;
  • Monitoring health in real time;
  • Theoretical calculations (DFT, molecular dynamics, etc.).

Dr. Gnanaprakasam Janani
Prof. Dr. Uk Sim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. AppliedChem is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • electrochemistry
  • energy storage
  • energy conversion
  • environment
  • health
  • sensing
  • monitoring
  • diagnostics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 4725 KiB  
Article
Synergizing Immune Balance: Curcumin Gold Nanoparticles and Ultrasound Irradiation for Macrophage Down-Regulation
by Bruna Henrique Teixeira, Karina de Oliveira Gonçalves, Daniel Perez Vieira and Lilia Coronato Courrol
AppliedChem 2024, 4(1), 70-85; https://doi.org/10.3390/appliedchem4010006 - 6 Mar 2024
Viewed by 652
Abstract
The multifaceted health benefits of curcumin (Curcuma longa), attributed to its antioxidant, antitumor, and anti-inflammatory activities, have drawn significant scientific attention. Curcumin shows promise as a potential modulator of macrophage polarization, offering a natural strategy for managing inflammation and promoting tissue repair. However, [...] Read more.
The multifaceted health benefits of curcumin (Curcuma longa), attributed to its antioxidant, antitumor, and anti-inflammatory activities, have drawn significant scientific attention. Curcumin shows promise as a potential modulator of macrophage polarization, offering a natural strategy for managing inflammation and promoting tissue repair. However, a limiting factor for this beneficial molecule is its limited bioavailability due to its low solubility in water. This study aimed to quantify the effect of curcumin gold nanoparticle (CurAuNP)-mediated ultrasound irradiation on THP-1-derived macrophages as potential therapeutic targets. The photoreduction method was applied to synthesize the gold nanoparticles with curcumin as a ligand (CurAu). The effect of adding polyethylene glycol in the synthesis process was studied (CurAuPEG). CurAuNP characterization included UV/Vis, Zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy, and FTIR. The amount of singlet oxygen released by curcumin and CurAuNPs was quantified by observing 1.3-diphenylisobenzofuran quenching upon ultrasound irradiation (1 MHz and 1 W/cm2). The results indicated that ultrasound therapy for 4 min with CurAuNPs significantly enhanced singlet oxygen generation and reduced macrophage viability compared to curcumin alone. The increased sonoluminescence and curcumin delivery facilitated by CurAuNPs led to greater curcumin activation. Consequently, CurAuNPs could offer promising therapeutic options for modulating macrophage polarization in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory stages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterial Synthesis and Processing for Advanced Applications)
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