Oxidative Stress in Livestock and Poultry

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2023) | Viewed by 23968

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition Control, College of Animal Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China
Interests: oxidative stress; sow; reproduction; milk synthesis; fatty acids
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition Control, College of Animal Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China
Interests: pig; sow; nutrients; mammary gland; lactation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Studies have found that elevated levels of oxidative stress have brought great challenges to livestock and poultry production, resulting in a series of negative effects such as reducing feed intake, feed conversion ratio and disease resistance as well as increasing mortality.

In the production process, improper management, extreme environment, nutrition deficiencies and rude transportation are major causes of oxidative stress in livestock and poultry. Mechanistically, the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) creates an imbalance between antioxidants and oxidants, leading to protein, lipid and nucleic acid damage and the disruption of cellular homeostasis. In addition, the perturbation of mitochondrial activity further promotes the production of ROS/RNS, which ultimately leads to impaired energy metabolism pathways. Recent findings suggest that redox signaling affects reproductive performance in livestock and poultry by affecting gene expression and epigenetic modifications. Therefore, from the perspective of animal husbandry, intervention strategies that alleviate oxidative stress status have attracted extensive attention.

The research topic will discuss the relationship between oxidative stress and livestock and poultry production and will further clarify the impact of oxidative stress on livestock and poultry production, reproduction, behaviours, biochemistry, immunity, genetics and the quality of livestock products.  Additionally, it is necessary to try to reduce the negative impact of oxidative stress on livestock and poultry production through nutritional regulation strategies or genetic screening methods.

We look forward to your contributions.

Dr. Wutai Guan
Dr. Shihai Zhang
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • oxidative stress
  • livestock
  • poultry
  • nutritional regulation strategies
  • genetic screening methods
  • reactive oxygen species
  • active nitrogen species

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 168 KiB  
Editorial
From Challenge to Opportunity: Addressing Oxidative Stress in Animal Husbandry
by Shihai Zhang
Antioxidants 2023, 12(8), 1543; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12081543 - 02 Aug 2023
Viewed by 743
Abstract
Years of study have explored the issues caused by oxidative stress in livestock and poultry production [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Livestock and Poultry)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

21 pages, 6583 KiB  
Article
Rehmannia glutinosa Polysaccharides: Optimization of the Decolorization Process and Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects in LPS-Stimulated Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells
by Heng Ren, Kejie Li, Yan Min, Binhang Qiu, Xiaolu Huang, Jingxin Luo, Liwen Qi, Maoli Kang, Peng Xia, Hanzhen Qiao, Jun Chen, Yaoming Cui, Liping Gan, Peng Wang and Jinrong Wang
Antioxidants 2023, 12(4), 914; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12040914 - 12 Apr 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1424
Abstract
Polysaccharide decolorization has a major effect on polysaccharide function. In the present study, the decolorization of Rehmannia glutinosa polysaccharides (RGP) is optimized using two methods—the AB-8 macroporous resin (RGP-1) method and the H2O2 (RGP-2) method. The optimal decolorization parameters for [...] Read more.
Polysaccharide decolorization has a major effect on polysaccharide function. In the present study, the decolorization of Rehmannia glutinosa polysaccharides (RGP) is optimized using two methods—the AB-8 macroporous resin (RGP-1) method and the H2O2 (RGP-2) method. The optimal decolorization parameters for the AB-8 macroporous resin method were as follows: temperature, 50 °C; macroporous resin addition, 8.4%; decolorization duration, 64 min; and pH, 5. Under these conditions, the overall score was 65.29 ± 3.4%. The optimal decolorization conditions for the H2O2 method were as follows: temperature, 51 °C; H2O2 addition, 9.5%; decolorization duration, 2 h; and pH, 8.6. Under these conditions, the overall score was 79.29 ± 4.8%. Two pure polysaccharides (RGP-1-A and RGP-2-A) were isolated from RGP-1 and RGP-2. Subsequently, their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and mechanisms were evaluated. RGP treatment activated the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway and significantly increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes (p < 0.05). It also inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory factors and suppressed the TLR4/NF-κB pathway (p < 0.05). RGP-1-A had a significantly better protective effect than RGP-2-A, likely owing to the sulfate and uronic groups it contains. Together, the findings indicate that RGP can act as a natural agent for the prevention of oxidation and inflammation-related diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Livestock and Poultry)
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17 pages, 3899 KiB  
Article
Chenodeoxycholic Acid (CDCA) Promoted Intestinal Epithelial Cell Proliferation by Regulating Cell Cycle Progression and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in IPEC-J2 Cells
by Lei Xu, Yanpin Li, Zixi Wei, Rong Bai, Ge Gao, Wenjuan Sun, Xianren Jiang, Junjun Wang, Xilong Li and Yu Pi
Antioxidants 2022, 11(11), 2285; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11112285 - 18 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2243
Abstract
Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a primary bile acid (BA), has been demonstrated to play an important role as a signaling molecule in various physiological functions. However, the role of CDCA in regulating intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) function remains largely unknown. Herein, porcine intestinal epithelial [...] Read more.
Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a primary bile acid (BA), has been demonstrated to play an important role as a signaling molecule in various physiological functions. However, the role of CDCA in regulating intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) function remains largely unknown. Herein, porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) were used as an in vitro model to investigate the effects of CDCA on IEC proliferation and explore the underlying mechanisms. IPEC-J2 cells were treated with CDCA, and flow cytometry and transcriptome analysis were adopted to investigate the effects and potential molecular mechanisms of CDCA on the proliferation of IECs. Our results indicated that adding 50 μmol/L of CDCA in the media significantly increased the proliferation of IPEC-J2 cells. In addition, CDCA treatment also hindered cell apoptosis, increased the proportion of G0/G1 phase cells in the cell cycle progression, reduced intracellular ROS, and MDA levels, and increased mitochondrial membrane potential, antioxidation enzyme activity (T-AOC and CAT), and intracellular ATP level (p < 0.05). RNA-seq results showed that CDCA significantly upregulated the expression of genes related to cell cycle progression (Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), cyclin G2 (CCNG2), cell-cycle progression gene 1 (CCPG1), Bcl-2 interacting protein 5 (BNIP5), etc.) and downregulated the expression of genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis (ND1, ND2, COX3, ATP6, etc.). Further KEGG pathway enrichment analysis showed that CDCA significantly enriched the signaling pathways of DNA replication, cell cycle, and p53. Collectively, this study demonstrated that CDCA could promote IPEC-J2 proliferation by regulating cell cycle progression and mitochondrial function. These findings provide a new strategy for promoting the intestinal health of pigs by regulating intestinal BA metabolism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Livestock and Poultry)
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13 pages, 1498 KiB  
Article
Maternal Amino Acid Mixtures Supplementation during Late Gestation and Lactation Improved Growth Performance of Piglets through Improving Colostrum Composition and Antioxidant Capacity
by Xiongkun Yuan, Xiangyu Zhang, Yujun Wu, Dongsheng Che, Hao Ye, Yu Pi, Shiyu Tao, Junjun Wang and Dandan Han
Antioxidants 2022, 11(11), 2144; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11112144 - 29 Oct 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1751
Abstract
During late gestation and lactation, oxidative stress in sows can affect their health and reproductive performance. Supplemental amino acid contributes to the antioxidant capacity of pigs. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different combinations of Gln, Leu and γ-GABA (amino [...] Read more.
During late gestation and lactation, oxidative stress in sows can affect their health and reproductive performance. Supplemental amino acid contributes to the antioxidant capacity of pigs. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different combinations of Gln, Leu and γ-GABA (amino acid mixtures, AAMs) during late gestation and lactation on the performance of the sows and their offspring. Fifty large white × landrace sows were randomly assigned to 5 groups (n = 10), including a control group and four AAMs groups (AAMs1, Gln + Leu; AAMs2 (Gln + GABA; AAMs3, Leu + GABA; AAMs4, Gln + Leu + GABA). AAMs supplementation improved the antioxidant capacity of sows, including significantly enhanced total antioxidant capacity in AAMs2, 3 and 4 groups and reduced malonaldehyde concentration in AAMs1, 3 and 4 groups. Additionally, all AAMs significantly increased lactoprotein, total solid and IgA levels of colostrum in sows during lactation. Average body weight of piglets on day 21 after birth in all AAMs groups were significantly increased. Furthermore, the significantly increased total antioxidant capacity was observed in the piglets of every AAMs group. In conclusion, supplementing AAMs during late gestation and lactation improved the antioxidant capacity of sows and colostrum composition, thereby enhancing antioxidant status and the growth performance of piglets. This study provides the possibility of maternal amino acid mixtures to improve the productivity of the swine industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Livestock and Poultry)
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18 pages, 2032 KiB  
Article
Effects of In Ovo Injection of α-Ketoglutaric Acid on Hatchability, Growth, Plasma Metabolites, and Antioxidant Status of Broilers
by Vaishali Gupta, Chris Major Ncho, Akshat Goel, Chae-Mi Jeong and Yang-Ho Choi
Antioxidants 2022, 11(11), 2102; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11112102 - 25 Oct 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2085
Abstract
Recently, α-ketoglutaric acid (AKG) has gained importance as an antioxidant. Its dietary supplementation in animals and humans has proved beneficial. Moreover, an extensive group of studies on in ovo feeding has proved that it produces better day-old chicks and overall performance. Combining the [...] Read more.
Recently, α-ketoglutaric acid (AKG) has gained importance as an antioxidant. Its dietary supplementation in animals and humans has proved beneficial. Moreover, an extensive group of studies on in ovo feeding has proved that it produces better day-old chicks and overall performance. Combining the two, we hypothesized that in ovo feeding of AKG could improve the antioxidant status in addition to chick quality and broiler performance. At 17.5 days of incubation, eggs were divided into one of five groups: eggs that received (i) no injection (U-CON), (ii) distilled water (DDW) only (0 AKG), (iii) 0.5% AKG dissolved in DDW (0.5 AKG), (iv) 1.0% AKG dissolved in DDW (1.0 AKG), or (v) 1.5% AKG dissolved in DDW (1.5 AKG). Chicks were raised until 21 days of age. Biological samples were collected on day 0 and day 21. Body weight (p = 0.020), average daily gain (p = 0.025), and average daily feed intake (p = 0.036) were found to quadratically increase with the amount of AKG during the grower phase. At day 0, the absolute (p = 0.040) and relative weight (p = 0.035) of the liver increased linearly with an increasing amount of AKG. The 0.5 AKG group had significantly higher plasma protein (p = 0.025), absolute and relative heart indices at day 0 (p = 0.006). An in ovo feeding of AKG improved the plasma antioxidant capacity of chicks at day 0 as compared to 0 AKG. AKG effect was seen on the plasma antioxidant balance, which increased linearly with the increasing dose of in ovo AKG. Furthermore, 1.0 AKG and 1.5 AKG showed a significant (p = 0.002) upregulation of the hepatic mRNA expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (NRF2) in comparison to 0 AKG. The results imply that without negatively affecting hatchability performance, in ovo feeding of AKG has beneficial effects on the antioxidant status of broilers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Livestock and Poultry)
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17 pages, 4018 KiB  
Article
Determination of Redox Status in Different Tissues of Lambs and Kids and Their in-between Relationship
by Zoi Skaperda, Ioannis D. Kyriazis, Fotios Tekos, Maria V. Alvanou, Paraskevi-Maria Nechalioti, Sotiria Makri, Angeliki Argyriadou, Sotiria Vouraki, Theodoros Kallitsis, Maria Kourti, Valasi Irene, Georgios Arsenos and Demetrios Kouretas
Antioxidants 2022, 11(10), 2065; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11102065 - 20 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1403
Abstract
The objective of this study was to assess the resting values of the physiological oxidative stress exhibited by lambs and kids reared in Greece, and the potential correlations between redox biomarker levels in blood and other tissues (liver, diaphragm, quadriceps, psoas major muscle). [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to assess the resting values of the physiological oxidative stress exhibited by lambs and kids reared in Greece, and the potential correlations between redox biomarker levels in blood and other tissues (liver, diaphragm, quadriceps, psoas major muscle). For this purpose, lambs and kids at different developmental stages (d.s.) were used. The latter corresponded to four live weight categories (LWC), each representing 25%, 35%, 70% and 100% of mature body weight. In each of the above tissues, the levels of five common redox biomarkers were determined: glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS), and protein carbonyls (CARBS). The results revealed that lambs and kids belonging to the 35% LWC had weaker endogenous antioxidant pools, while animals in the 70% and 100% LWC had elevated intrinsic antioxidant defense systems. Blood redox biomarkers were associated with the respective ones measured in the diaphragm, liver, quadriceps, and psoas major of both species. Importantly, TBARS levels in blood of animals in the 25% and 100% LWC are correlated with the TBARS levels in all other tissues tested. Blood antioxidant parameters might be used as potential biomarkers to predict the antioxidant status of tissues that affect meat quality. The latter would facilitate quality assessment prior to slaughter, allowing for timely nutritional interventions that can improve meat products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Livestock and Poultry)
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17 pages, 3923 KiB  
Article
Histone Methyltransferase MLL1 Mediates Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis upon Deoxynivalenol Exposure in the Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells
by Dongfeng Shi, Yiyi Shan, Xiaoyang Zhu, Haifei Wang, Shenglong Wu, Zhengchang Wu and Wenbin Bao
Antioxidants 2022, 11(10), 2006; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11102006 - 11 Oct 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1820
Abstract
Deoxynivalenol (DON), as a secondary metabolite of fungi, is continually detected in livestock feed and has a high risk to animals and humans. Moreover, pigs are very sensitive to DON. Recently, the role of histone modification has drawn people’s attention; however, few studies [...] Read more.
Deoxynivalenol (DON), as a secondary metabolite of fungi, is continually detected in livestock feed and has a high risk to animals and humans. Moreover, pigs are very sensitive to DON. Recently, the role of histone modification has drawn people’s attention; however, few studies have elucidated how histone modification participates in the cytotoxicity or genotoxicity induced by mycotoxins. In this study, we used intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2 cells) as a model to DON exposure in vitro. Mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) regulates gene expression by exerting the role of methyltransferase. Our studies demonstrated that H3K4me3 enrichment was enhanced and MLL1 was highly upregulated upon 1 μg/mL DON exposure in IPEC-J2 cells. We found that the silencing of MLL1 resulted in increasing the apoptosis rate, arresting the cell cycle, and activating the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway. An RNA-sequencing analysis proved that differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were enriched in the cell cycle, apoptosis, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling pathway between the knockdown of MLL1 and negative control groups, which were associated with cytotoxicity induced by DON. In summary, these current results might provide new insight into how MLL1 regulates cytotoxic effects induced by DON via an epigenetic mechanism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Livestock and Poultry)
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18 pages, 1103 KiB  
Article
Effects of Total Flavonoids of Artemisia ordosica on Growth Performance, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Status of Lipopolysaccharide-Challenged Broilers
by Lulu Shi, Xiao Jin, Yuanqing Xu, Yuanyuan Xing, Sumei Yan, Yanfei Guo, Yuchen Cheng and Binlin Shi
Antioxidants 2022, 11(10), 1985; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11101985 - 05 Oct 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1666
Abstract
Artemisia ordosica has been applied as a traditional Chinese/Mongolian medicine for the treatment of certain inflammatory ailments. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of Artemisia ordosica total flavonoids (ATF) supplemented in diets on growth performance, oxidative stress, and antioxidant status in [...] Read more.
Artemisia ordosica has been applied as a traditional Chinese/Mongolian medicine for the treatment of certain inflammatory ailments. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of Artemisia ordosica total flavonoids (ATF) supplemented in diets on growth performance, oxidative stress, and antioxidant status in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged broilers. A total of 240 one-day-old Arbor Acre broilers were randomly allotted into 5 groups with 6 replicates (n = 8), which were the basal diet group (CON), LPS-challenged and basal diet group (LPS), and the LPS-challenged and basal diet added with low (500 mg/kg), middle (750 mg/kg), and high (1000 mg/kg) doses of ATF groups (ATF-L, ATF-M, and ATF-H), respectively. On day 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, and 28, broilers were injected intra-abdominally either with LPS or an equivalent amount of saline. Results showed that dietary ATF alleviated the LPS-induced decrease in BW, ADG, and ADFI in broilers. Dietary ATF supplementation reversed the increased serum oxidative damage indexes (reactive oxygen species, protein carbonyl, and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine) and the decreased serum antioxidant indexes [total superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC)] in LPS-challenged broilers. Moreover, ATF alleviated the decreased antioxidase activity and the over-production of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the liver and spleen induced by LPS. This study also showed that ATF alleviated the increased mRNA expression of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) and the decreased mRNA expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), CAT, SOD, and GPx in the liver and spleen of broilers challenged with LPS. In conclusion, ATF has a strong capacity to enhance antioxidant enzyme activity and relieve oxidative stress and can be used as a potential novel feed additive in poultry diets to improve growth performance and antioxidant capacity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Livestock and Poultry)
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16 pages, 4127 KiB  
Article
Hydroxy-Selenomethionine, an Organic Selenium Source, Increases Selenoprotein Expression and Positively Modulates the Inflammatory Response of LPS-Stimulated Macrophages
by Joan Campo-Sabariz, Adriana García-Vara, David Moral-Anter, Mickael Briens, Mohammed A. Hachemi, Eric Pinloche, Ruth Ferrer and Raquel Martín-Venegas
Antioxidants 2022, 11(10), 1876; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11101876 - 22 Sep 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2046
Abstract
The role of 2-hydroxy-(4-methylseleno)butanoic acid (OH-SeMet), a form of organic selenium (Se), in selenoprotein synthesis and inflammatory response of THP1-derived macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been investigated. Glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity, GPX1 gene expression, selenoprotein P (SELENOP) protein and gene expression, and [...] Read more.
The role of 2-hydroxy-(4-methylseleno)butanoic acid (OH-SeMet), a form of organic selenium (Se), in selenoprotein synthesis and inflammatory response of THP1-derived macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been investigated. Glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity, GPX1 gene expression, selenoprotein P (SELENOP) protein and gene expression, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were studied in Se-deprived conditions (6 and 24 h). Then, macrophages were supplemented with OH-SeMet for 72 h and GPX1 and SELENOP gene expression were determined. The protective effect of OH-SeMet against oxidative stress was studied in H2O2-stimulated macrophages, as well as the effect on GPX1 gene expression, oxidative stress, cytokine production (TNFα, IL-1β and IL-10), and phagocytic and killing capacities after LPS stimulation. Se deprivation induced a reduction in GPX activity, GPX1 gene expression, and SELENOP protein and gene expression at 24 h. OH-SeMet upregulated GPX1 and SELENOP gene expression and decreased ROS production after H2O2 treatment. In LPS-stimulated macrophages, OH-SeMet upregulated GPX1 gene expression, enhanced phagocytic and killing capacities, and reduced ROS and cytokine production. Therefore, OH-SeMet supplementation supports selenoprotein expression and controls oxidative burst and cytokine production while enhancing phagocytic and killing capacities, modulating the inflammatory response, and avoiding the potentially toxic insult produced by highly activated macrophages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Livestock and Poultry)
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18 pages, 3502 KiB  
Article
Influences of Dietary Vitamin E, Selenium-Enriched Yeast, and Soy Isoflavone Supplementation on Growth Performance, Antioxidant Capacity, Carcass Traits, Meat Quality and Gut Microbiota in Finishing Pigs
by Cui Zhu, Jingsen Yang, Xiaoyan Nie, Qiwen Wu, Li Wang and Zongyong Jiang
Antioxidants 2022, 11(8), 1510; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11081510 - 01 Aug 2022
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 2235
Abstract
This study investigated the effects of dietary compound antioxidants on growth performance, antioxidant capacity, carcass traits, meat quality, and gut microbiota in finishing pigs. A total of 36 barrows were randomly assigned to 2 treatments with 6 replicates. The pigs were fed with [...] Read more.
This study investigated the effects of dietary compound antioxidants on growth performance, antioxidant capacity, carcass traits, meat quality, and gut microbiota in finishing pigs. A total of 36 barrows were randomly assigned to 2 treatments with 6 replicates. The pigs were fed with a basal diet (control) or the basal diet supplemented with 200 mg/kg vitamin E, 0.3 mg/kg selenium-enriched yeast, and 20 mg/kg soy isoflavone. Dietary compound antioxidants decreased the average daily feed intake (ADFI) and feed to gain ratio (F/G) at d 14–28 in finishing pigs (p < 0.05). The plasma total protein, urea nitrogen, triglyceride, and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were decreased while the plasma glutathione (GSH) to glutathione oxidized (GSSG) ratio (GSH/GSSG) was increased by compound antioxidants (p < 0.05). Dietary compound antioxidants increased loin area and b* value at 45 min, decreased backfat thickness at last rib, and drip loss at 48 h (p < 0.05). The relative abundance of colonic Peptococcus at the genus level was increased and ileal Turicibacter_sp_H121 abundance at the species level was decreased by dietary compound antioxidants. Spearman analysis showed a significant negative correlation between the relative abundance of colonic Peptococcus and plasma MDA concentration and meat drip loss at 48 h. Collectively, dietary supplementation with compound antioxidants of vitamin E, selenium-enrich yeast, and soy isoflavone could improve feed efficiency and antioxidant capacity, and modify the backfat thickness and meat quality through modulation of the gut microbiota community. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Livestock and Poultry)
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Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

14 pages, 1178 KiB  
Review
Exploring the Benefits of Probiotics in Gut Inflammation and Diarrhea—From an Antioxidant Perspective
by Qihui Li, Tenghui Zheng, Hanting Ding, Jiaming Chen, Baofeng Li, Qianzi Zhang, Siwang Yang, Shihai Zhang and Wutai Guan
Antioxidants 2023, 12(7), 1342; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12071342 - 26 Jun 2023
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3047
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), characterized by an abnormal immune response, includes two distinct types: Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Extensive research has revealed that the pathogeny of IBD encompasses genetic factors, environmental factors, immune dysfunction, dysbiosis, and lifestyle choices. Furthermore, patients [...] Read more.
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), characterized by an abnormal immune response, includes two distinct types: Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Extensive research has revealed that the pathogeny of IBD encompasses genetic factors, environmental factors, immune dysfunction, dysbiosis, and lifestyle choices. Furthermore, patients with IBD exhibit both local and systemic oxidative damage caused by the excessive presence of reactive oxygen species. This oxidative damage exacerbates immune response imbalances, intestinal mucosal damage, and dysbiosis in IBD patients. Meanwhile, the weaning period represents a crucial phase for pigs, during which they experience pronounced intestinal immune and inflammatory responses, leading to severe diarrhea and increased mortality rates. Pigs are highly similar to humans in terms of physiology and anatomy, making them a potential choice for simulating human IBD. Although the exact mechanism behind IBD and post-weaning diarrhea remains unclear, the oxidative damage, in its progression and pathogenesis, is well acknowledged. Besides conventional anti-inflammatory drugs, certain probiotics, particularly Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria strains, have been found to possess antioxidant properties. These include the scavenging of reactive oxygen species, chelating metal ions to inhibit the Fenton reaction, and the regulation of host antioxidant enzymes. Consequently, numerous studies in the last two decades have committed to exploring the role of probiotics in alleviating IBD. Here, we sequentially discuss the oxidative damage in IBD and post-weaning diarrhea pathogenesis, the negative consequences of oxidative stress on IBD, the effectiveness of probiotics in IBD treatment, the application of probiotics in weaned piglets, and the potential antioxidant mechanisms of probiotics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Livestock and Poultry)
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18 pages, 1002 KiB  
Review
Plant-Derived Polyphenols as Nrf2 Activators to Counteract Oxidative Stress and Intestinal Toxicity Induced by Deoxynivalenol in Swine: An Emerging Research Direction
by Jun Chen, Zhouyin Huang, Xuehai Cao, Xingping Chen, Tiande Zou and Jinming You
Antioxidants 2022, 11(12), 2379; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11122379 - 01 Dec 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2077
Abstract
The contamination of deoxynivalenol (DON) in feed is a global problem, which seriously threatens the productivity efficiency and welfare of farm animals and the food security of humans. Pig is the most sensitive species to DON, and is readily exposed to DON through [...] Read more.
The contamination of deoxynivalenol (DON) in feed is a global problem, which seriously threatens the productivity efficiency and welfare of farm animals and the food security of humans. Pig is the most sensitive species to DON, and is readily exposed to DON through its grain-enriched diet. The intestine serves as the first biological barrier to ingested mycotoxin, and is, therefore, the first target of DON. In the past decade, a growing amount of attention has been paid to plant-derived polyphenols as functional compounds against DON-induced oxidative stress and intestinal toxicity in pigs. In this review, we systematically updated the latest research progress in plant polyphenols detoxifying DON-induced intestinal toxicity in swine. We also discussed the potential underlying mechanism of action of polyphenols as Nrf2 activators in protecting against DON-induced enterotoxicity of swine. The output of this update points out an emerging research direction, as polyphenols have great potential to be developed as feed additives for swine to counteract DON-induced oxidative stress and intestinal toxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress in Livestock and Poultry)
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