Antioxidant Extenders in Meat Oxidation

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Aberrant Oxidation of Biomolecules".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2022) | Viewed by 9631

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Animal Science, Food and Nutrition (DIANA), Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Piacenza and Cremona Campus, Piacenza, Italy
Interests: foodomics; feedomics; food chemistry; cheese; milk; food quality and traceability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Centro Tecnológico de la Carne de Galicia, 32900 Orense, Spain
Interests: meat quality; genetic influences in meat quality; genetic improvement
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last years, using plant extracts as a source of antioxidant compounds is becoming a great strategy to increase the quality and health-related properties of meat and meat-derived products. These compounds represent the ideal candidates to replace less safe synthetic antioxidants to increase the shelf life of meat products and to reduce the oxidative phenomena as related to both proteins and lipids.Therefore, taking into account the more recent optimization of several extraction methods to obtain ad-hoc antioxidant extracts from plant sources, the contributions to this Special Issue may cover all research aspects related, but not limited to, the:1) characterization and use of antioxidant extracts from plant sources; 2) the elucidation of their mechanisms of action with a particular focus on the increase of shelf-life and the reduction of both lipid and protein oxidations; 3) and the use of foodomics-based platforms to assess the changes of nutritional values of meat and meat derived products.

Dr. Gabriele Rocchetti
Prof. Dr. Jose Lorenzo Rodriguez
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • antioxidants
  • plant extracts
  • foodomics
  • meat
  • fermented meat
  • polyphenols
  • lipidomics
  • proteomics
  • metabolomics.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 4078 KiB  
Article
The Combination of Untargeted Metabolomics with Response Surface Methodology to Optimize the Functional Potential of Common Duckweed (Lemna minor L.)
by Leilei Zhang, Gabriele Rocchetti, Gokhan Zengin, Daniele Del Buono, Marco Trevisan and Luigi Lucini
Antioxidants 2023, 12(2), 313; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12020313 - 29 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1658
Abstract
The present study was designed to evaluate the functional potential of common duckweed (Lemna minor L.) as a source of bioactive compounds of nutraceutical interest. The untargeted profiling of the bioactive components of common duckweed was carried out through ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography [...] Read more.
The present study was designed to evaluate the functional potential of common duckweed (Lemna minor L.) as a source of bioactive compounds of nutraceutical interest. The untargeted profiling of the bioactive components of common duckweed was carried out through ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS), in parallel with assessing in vitro antioxidant and enzymatic inhibition properties. The optimization of extraction parameters was determined using the response surface methodology (RSM) through a 3-factor central composite design. The process parameters included extraction temperature, % of ethanol, and ultrasound power, while the response variables were the phenolic content (considering each main phenolic class), total glucosinolates, total carotenoids, the antioxidant potential, and enzyme inhibition activities. The results revealed that common duckweed was a rich source of carotenoids and total flavonoids (mainly flavones and flavonols), followed by phenolic acids, low-molecular-weight phenolics, and glucosinolates. Interestingly, the total flavones, total flavonols and total carotenoid equivalents showed the highest and most positive correlation values with the bioactive properties measured. Finally, the combined RSM approach and unsupervised statistics allowed us to point out the pivotal impact of ethanol percentage in the extraction solvent to recover the highest amounts of bioactive compounds efficiently. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Extenders in Meat Oxidation)
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21 pages, 4924 KiB  
Article
Novel Insights into Total Flavonoids of Rhizoma Drynariae against Meat Quality Deterioration Caused by Dietary Aflatoxin B1 Exposure in Chickens
by Ke Yue, Kai-Li Liu, Yao-Di Zhu, Wen-Li Ding, Bo-Wen Xu, Aftab Shaukat, Yan-Feng He, Lu-Xi Lin, Cai Zhang and Shu-Cheng Huang
Antioxidants 2023, 12(1), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12010083 - 30 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2213
Abstract
Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a group of highly toxic mycotoxins that are commonly found in human and animal foods and threaten animal and human food safety. Total flavonoids of Rhizoma Drynaria (TFRD), a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, exert multiple biological activities such as [...] Read more.
Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a group of highly toxic mycotoxins that are commonly found in human and animal foods and threaten animal and human food safety. Total flavonoids of Rhizoma Drynaria (TFRD), a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, exert multiple biological activities such as immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidation effects. Here, a total of 160 healthy 21-day-old male broilers were randomly divided into four groups: the CON group, the TFRD group, the AFB1 group, and the AFB1 + TFRD group. The study found that AFB1 exposure altered the breast meat quality-related indicators, including meat sensory and physical indicators. Metabolomics analysis further showed that the change in meat quality was closely associated with significantly differential metabolites of breast muscle. Furthermore, spotlighted amino acid content contributes to changes in the secondary structure of the myofibrillar protein by Raman spectroscopy analysis, which was associated with the oxidative stress and inflammatory response in AFB1-exposed breast meat. Meanwhile, dietary 125 mg/kg TFRD supplementation could effectively restore the changes in breast meat quality. Taken together, these results by multi-technical analysis revealed that AFB1 exposure causes deterioration of chicken meat quality and that TFRD may be a potential herbal extract to antagonize mycotoxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Extenders in Meat Oxidation)
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16 pages, 1889 KiB  
Article
Elderberry (Sambucus nigra L.) Encapsulated Extracts as Meat Extenders against Lipid and Protein Oxidation during the Shelf-Life of Beef Burgers
by Gabriele Rocchetti, Pier Paolo Becchi, Luigi Lucini, Aurora Cittadini, Paulo E. S. Munekata, Mirian Pateiro, Rubén Domínguez and José M. Lorenzo
Antioxidants 2022, 11(11), 2130; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11112130 - 28 Oct 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1810
Abstract
In this work, we studied the impact of encapsulated elderberry extracts as natural meat extenders to preserve both the quality and the oxidative stability of beef burgers. In particular, the comprehensive chemical changes of beef burgers treated with different antioxidants, namely, (a) a [...] Read more.
In this work, we studied the impact of encapsulated elderberry extracts as natural meat extenders to preserve both the quality and the oxidative stability of beef burgers. In particular, the comprehensive chemical changes of beef burgers treated with different antioxidants, namely, (a) a control without antioxidants, (b) 0.5 g/kg sodium erythorbate (ERY), (c) 2.5 g/kg encapsulated elderberry extract (EE 2.5), and (d) 5 g/kg encapsulated elderberry extract (EE 5), each one packaged under modified atmosphere (80% O2 and 20% CO2) for 13 days storage at 2 ± 1 °C, were deeply evaluated. Overall, EEs showed a wide array of antioxidant compounds, namely polyphenols like anthocyanins, flavonols, and phenolic acids. Multivariate statistics provided marked chemical differences between burgers manufactured with EEs and synthetic antioxidants (ERY) during 13-days storage in terms of both metabolomic profiles and typical lipid/protein oxidation markers (such as malondialdehyde and total carbonyls). Most of the differences could be attributed to some discriminant compounds, namely glutathione, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, hydroxy/peroxy-derivatives of fatty acids, carbonyl compounds (such as 5-nonen-2-one and 1,5-octadien-3-one), and cholesterol. Interestingly, significant correlations (p < 0.01) were observed between malondialdehyde, total carbonyls, and these discriminant metabolites. The combination of spectrophotometric approaches and a high-throughput untargeted metabolomics analysis outlined a strong modulation of both lipid and protein oxidations, likely promoted by the encapsulated meat extender (elderberry), thus confirming its ability to delay oxidative phenomena during the shelf-life of beef burgers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Extenders in Meat Oxidation)
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11 pages, 953 KiB  
Article
Effects of Kiwifruit Peel Extract and Its Antioxidant Potential on the Quality Characteristics of Beef Sausage
by Evans Frimpong Boateng, Ziyi Yang and Wangang Zhang
Antioxidants 2022, 11(8), 1441; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11081441 - 25 Jul 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1334
Abstract
In the wake of arresting consumers’ health concerns associated with synthetic antioxidants used in meat products, kiwifruit peel by-product was explored as a natural antioxidant source in the current study. A lyophilized kiwifruit peel extract (KPE) at various concentrations of KPE1 (1.5%), KPE2 [...] Read more.
In the wake of arresting consumers’ health concerns associated with synthetic antioxidants used in meat products, kiwifruit peel by-product was explored as a natural antioxidant source in the current study. A lyophilized kiwifruit peel extract (KPE) at various concentrations of KPE1 (1.5%), KPE2 (3%), and KPE3 (4.5%) was incorporated into formulated beef sausages to compare the physicochemical, sensory quality, and antioxidant efficacy to the treatments of control (CT 0% KPE) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT 0.01%) during 12 d of refrigerated (4 ± 1 °C) storage. The KPE inclusion levels induced significantly higher yellowness (b*) values than CT and BHT, whereas no negative influence of KPE was revealed for lightness (L*) and redness (a*). The pH values of the KPE treatments were reduced, and cooking yield increased significantly (p < 0.05), in line with the increasing amount of KPE percentages (1.5%, 3%, and 4.5%) compared to CT and BHT samples. E-nose results showed an enhancement in aroma in KPE treatments, compared to BHT and CT, during the storage period. KPE3 treatment showed a constant lesser value in 2-Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) as storage days increased, compared to the CT and BHT samples. Overall, the KPE is effective for antioxidative capacity, and has the potential to be used as a natural antioxidant in beef sausage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Extenders in Meat Oxidation)
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12 pages, 427 KiB  
Article
Changes in Quality Traits and Oxidation Stability of Syzygium aromaticum Extract-Added Cooked Ground Beef during Frozen Storage
by Mohammad Ashrafuzzaman Zahid, Jeong-Uk Eom, Rashida Parvin, Jin-Kyu Seo and Han-Sul Yang
Antioxidants 2022, 11(3), 534; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11030534 - 11 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1670
Abstract
This study was accomplished by comparing the oxidative stability of (0.1%) Syzygium aromaticum extract (SAE) and (0.02%) butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-added cooked ground beef with an antioxidant free-control sample during frozen storage. All samples showed a non-significant (p > 0.05) effect on pH, [...] Read more.
This study was accomplished by comparing the oxidative stability of (0.1%) Syzygium aromaticum extract (SAE) and (0.02%) butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-added cooked ground beef with an antioxidant free-control sample during frozen storage. All samples showed a non-significant (p > 0.05) effect on pH, thawing loss, redness, and yellowness values during storage. Incorporation of BHT and SAE led to a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and volatile levels as an active antioxidant. The generation of less volatiles found in SAE-treated samples up to 6 months (p < 0.05) of storage. Therefore, SAE-protected ground beef can lead to lower lightness, lipid oxidation, and volatile compounds levels after cooking compared with control and BHT samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Extenders in Meat Oxidation)
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