Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Extraction and Industrial Applications of Antioxidants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2023) | Viewed by 46776

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Division of Molecular Medicine, Ruđer Bošković Institute, POB 180 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: pharmacology; neuroscience; natural products; antioxidant capacity; antimicrobial potential
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Guest Editor
Department for Biology and Pathology of Fish and Bees, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zagreb, 10 000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: biology and pathology of honeybees; bumblebees; wild bees; disease diagnostic methods; one-health approach; Apis mellifera veterinary medicine; apian products; environment monitoring
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Honey bees produce several products that have been used for centuries by humans for various purposes: royal jelly, venom and wax, as well as processed honey, propolis and pollen. Beneficial effects of honey bee products have been recognized and utilized as they have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and antioxidant activities. The main focus of this Special Issue is to unravel old findings, present novel ones and combine those with current global needs, not only as remedies but also as agents with potential to promote health and reduce the risk of development of many diseases. In particular, oxidative stress underlies many, especially “modern”, diseases, and honey bee products may serve as a supportive means due to their antioxidant capacity. We also aim to discuss the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of these complex products that are variable in their composition, and the need for standardization of their quality parameters. 

Prof. Dr. Josipa Vlainić
Prof. Dr. Ivana Tlak Gajger
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • honey bee products
  • antioxidant capacity
  • polyphenol content
  • functional food
  • health promotion

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Research

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26 pages, 7680 KiB  
Article
The Antioxidant and Prebiotic Activities of Mixtures Honey/Biomimetic NaDES and Polyphenols Show Differences between Honeysuckle and Raspberry Extracts
by Luminița Dimitriu, Diana Constantinescu-Aruxandei, Daniel Preda, Ionuț Moraru, Narcisa Elena Băbeanu and Florin Oancea
Antioxidants 2023, 12(9), 1678; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12091678 - 28 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1105
Abstract
In our previous research, we demonstrated that honey and its biomimetic natural deep eutectic solvent (NaDES) modulate the antioxidant activity (AOA) of the raspberry extract (RE). In this study, we evaluated the AOA behaviour of the mixture honey/NaDES–honeysuckle (Lonicera caprifolium, LFL) extract [...] Read more.
In our previous research, we demonstrated that honey and its biomimetic natural deep eutectic solvent (NaDES) modulate the antioxidant activity (AOA) of the raspberry extract (RE). In this study, we evaluated the AOA behaviour of the mixture honey/NaDES–honeysuckle (Lonicera caprifolium, LFL) extract and compared it with the mixture honey/NaDES–RE. These two extracts have similar major flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic acid compounds but differ in their total content and the presence of anthocyanins in RE. Therefore, it was of interest to see if the modulation of the LFL polyphenols by honey/NaDES was similar to that of RE. We also evaluated the prebiotic activity of these mixtures and individual components on Limosilactobacillus reuteri DSM 20016. Although honey/NaDES modulated the AOA of both extracts, from synergism to antagonism, the modulation was different between the two extracts for some AOA activities. Honey/NaDES mixtures enriched with LFL and RE did not show significant differences in bacterial growth stimulation. However, at a concentration of 45 mg/mL, the honey -LFL mixture exhibited a higher effect compared to the honey–RE mixture. The antioxidant and prebiotic properties of mixtures between honey and polyphenol-rich extracts are determined by multiple interactions in complex chemical systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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12 pages, 886 KiB  
Article
Chemical Components and Antioxidant Activity of Geotrigona sp. and Tetragonisca fiebrigi Stingless Bee Cerumen Reduce Juglone-Induced Oxidative Stress in Caenorhabditis elegans
by Isamara Carvalho Ferreira, Raíssa Cristina Darroz Côrrea, Sarah Lam Orué, Daniel Ferreira Leite, Paola dos Santos da Rocha, Claudia Andrea Lima Cardoso, Rosilda Mara Mussury, Patricia Vit, Kely de Picoli Souza, Edson Lucas dos Santos and Jaqueline Ferreira Campos
Antioxidants 2023, 12(6), 1276; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12061276 - 15 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1344
Abstract
Cerumen is a bee product produced exclusively by stingless bees, resulting from a mixture of beeswax and plant resins. The antioxidant activity of bee products has been investigated since oxidative stress is associated with the onset and progression of several diseases that can [...] Read more.
Cerumen is a bee product produced exclusively by stingless bees, resulting from a mixture of beeswax and plant resins. The antioxidant activity of bee products has been investigated since oxidative stress is associated with the onset and progression of several diseases that can lead to death. In this context, this study aimed to investigate the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of cerumen produced by the Geotrigona sp. and Tetragonisca fiebrigi stingless bees, in vitro and in vivo. The chemical characterization of cerumen extracts was performed by HPLC, GC, and ICP OES analyses. The in vitro antioxidant potential was evaluated by DPPH and ABTS•+ free radical scavenging methods, and in human erythrocytes subjected to oxidative stress with AAPH. In vivo, the antioxidant potential was evaluated in Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes subjected to oxidative stress with juglone. Both cerumen extracts presented phenolic compounds, fatty acids, and metallic minerals in their chemical constitution. The cerumen extracts showed antioxidant activity by capturing free radicals, reducing lipid peroxidation in human erythrocytes, and reducing oxidative stress in C. elegans, observed by the increase in viability. The results obtained indicate that cerumen extracts from Geotrigona sp. and Tetragonisca fiebrigi stingless bees may be promising against oxidative stress and associated diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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33 pages, 4674 KiB  
Article
Antioxidant Activity and Phenolic Compound Identification and Quantification in Western Australian Honeys
by Ivan Lozada Lawag, Md Khairul Islam, Tomislav Sostaric, Lee Yong Lim, Katherine Hammer and Cornelia Locher
Antioxidants 2023, 12(1), 189; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12010189 - 12 Jan 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3320
Abstract
This study reports on the total phenolic content and antioxidant activity as well as the phenolic compounds that are present in Calothamnus spp. (Red Bell), Agonis flexuosa (Coastal Peppermint), Corymbia calophylla (Marri) and Eucalyptus marginata (Jarrah) honeys from Western Australia. The honey’s total [...] Read more.
This study reports on the total phenolic content and antioxidant activity as well as the phenolic compounds that are present in Calothamnus spp. (Red Bell), Agonis flexuosa (Coastal Peppermint), Corymbia calophylla (Marri) and Eucalyptus marginata (Jarrah) honeys from Western Australia. The honey’s total phenolic content (TPC) was determined using a modified Folin–Ciocalteu assay, while their total antioxidant activity was determined using FRAP and DPPH assays. Phenolic constituents were identified using a High Performance Thin-Layer Chromatography (HTPLC)-derived phenolic database, and the identified phenolic compounds were quantified using HPTLC. Finally, constituents that contribute to the honeys’ antioxidant activity were identified using a DPPH-HPTLC bioautography assay. Based on the results, Calothamnus spp. honey (n = 8) was found to contain the highest (59.4 ± 7.91 mg GAE/100 g) TPC, followed by Eucalyptus marginata honey (50.58 ± 3.76 mg GAE/100 g), Agonis flexuosa honey (36.08 ± 4.2 mg GAE/100 g) and Corymbia calophylla honey (29.15 ± 5.46 mg GAE/100 g). In the FRAP assay, Calothamnus spp. honey also had the highest activity (9.24 ± 1.68 mmol Fe2+/kg), followed by Eucalyptus marginata honey (mmol Fe2+/kg), whereas Agonis flexuosa (5.45 ± 1.64 mmol Fe2+/kg) and Corymbia calophylla honeys (4.48 ± 0.82 mmol Fe2+/kg) had comparable FRAP activity. In the DPPH assay, when the mean values were compared, it was found that Calothamnus spp. honey again had the highest activity (3.88 ± 0.96 mmol TE/kg) while the mean DPPH antioxidant activity of Eucalyptus marginata, Agonis flexuosa, and Corymbia calophylla honeys were comparable. Kojic acid and epigallocatechin gallate were found in all honeys, whilst other constituents (e.g., m-coumaric acid, lumichrome, gallic acid, taxifolin, luteolin, epicatechin, hesperitin, eudesmic acid, syringic acid, protocatechuic acid, t-cinnamic acid, o-anisic acid) were only identified in some of the honeys. DPPH-HPTLC bioautography demonstrated that most of the identified compounds possess antioxidant activity, except for t-cinnamic acid, eudesmic acid, o-anisic acid, and lumichrome. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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28 pages, 5635 KiB  
Article
Honey and Its Biomimetic Deep Eutectic Solvent Modulate the Antioxidant Activity of Polyphenols
by Luminița Dimitriu, Diana Constantinescu-Aruxandei, Daniel Preda, Andra-Lavinia Nichițean, Cristian-Andi Nicolae, Victor Alexandru Faraon, Marius Ghiurea, Mihaela Ganciarov, Narcisa Elena Băbeanu and Florin Oancea
Antioxidants 2022, 11(11), 2194; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11112194 - 06 Nov 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2283
Abstract
Honey is a highly valued natural product with antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. However, its antioxidant activity (AOA) is not as high as that of other honeybee products, such as propolis. Several polyphenol—honey formulations have been proposed up to now, most of them [...] Read more.
Honey is a highly valued natural product with antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. However, its antioxidant activity (AOA) is not as high as that of other honeybee products, such as propolis. Several polyphenol—honey formulations have been proposed up to now, most of them using maceration of biomass in honey or mixtures with liquid extracts, which either limit polyphenols bioavailability or destroy the characteristics of honey. To improve the health benefits of honey by increasing AOA and keeping its structural and sensory properties, we propose its enrichment in a polyphenol extract of raspberry after solvent evaporation. A honey-biomimetic natural deep eutectic solvent (NaDES) was prepared and compared with honey. The main polyphenols found in the raspberry extract were tested in combination with honey and NaDES, respectively. The AOA was determined by DPPH, ABTS, CUPRAC, and FRAP methods. The AOA behaviour of honey—polyphenol mixtures varied from synergism to antagonism, being influenced by the AOA method, polyphenol type, and/or mixture concentration. The honey-biomimetic NaDES resulted in similar AOA behaviour as with honey mixed with polyphenols. Honey seems to have additional properties that increase synergism or reduce antagonism in some cases. Honey and its biomimetic NaDES modulate AOA of polyphenols extract. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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21 pages, 1530 KiB  
Article
Therapeutic Effects of Heterotrigona itama (Stingless Bee) Bee Bread in Improving Hepatic Lipid Metabolism through the Activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 Signaling Pathway in an Obese Rat Model
by Zaida Zakaria, Zaidatul Akmal Othman, Joseph Bagi Suleiman, Khairul Mohd Fadzli Mustaffa, Nur Asyilla Che Jalil, Wan Syaheedah Wan Ghazali, Ninie Nadia Zulkipli, Mahaneem Mohamed and Khaidatul Akmar Kamaruzaman
Antioxidants 2022, 11(11), 2190; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11112190 - 05 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2305
Abstract
Bee bread (BB) has traditionally been used as a dietary supplement to treat liver problems. This study evaluated the therapeutic effects of Heterotrigona itama BB from Malaysia on obesity-induced hepatic lipid metabolism disorder via the regulation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway. Male Sprague Dawley [...] Read more.
Bee bread (BB) has traditionally been used as a dietary supplement to treat liver problems. This study evaluated the therapeutic effects of Heterotrigona itama BB from Malaysia on obesity-induced hepatic lipid metabolism disorder via the regulation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed with either a normal diet or high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks to induce obesity. Following 6 weeks, obese rats were treated either with distilled water (OB group), BB (0.5 g/kg body weight/day) (OB + BB group) or orlistat (10 mg/kg body weight/day) (OB + OR group) concurrent with HFD for another 6 weeks. BB treatment suppressed Keap1 and promoted Nrf2 cytoplasmic and nuclear translocations, leading to a reduction in oxidative stress, and promoted antioxidant enzyme activities in the liver. Furthermore, BB down-regulated lipid synthesis and its regulator levels (SIRT1, AMPK), and up-regulated fatty acid β-oxidation in the liver of obese rats, being consistent with alleviated lipid levels, improved hepatic histopathological changes (steatosis, hepatocellular hypertrophy, inflammation and glycogen expression) and prevented progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. These results showed the therapeutic potentials of H. itama BB against oxidative stress and improved lipid metabolism in the liver of obese rats possibly by targeting the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway, hence proposing its role as a natural supplement capable of treating obesity-induced fatty liver disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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14 pages, 3617 KiB  
Article
Comparative Study of Antiviral, Cytotoxic, Antioxidant Activities, Total Phenolic Profile and Chemical Content of Propolis Samples in Different Colors from Turkiye
by Nazli Boke Sarikahya, Ekin Varol, Gaye Sumer Okkali, Banu Yucel, Rodica Margaoan and Ayse Nalbantsoy
Antioxidants 2022, 11(10), 2075; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11102075 - 21 Oct 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1990
Abstract
Propolis is a valuable natural substance obtained by honey bees after being collected from the bark, resin of trees, plant leaves and mixed with their saliva, and has been widely used for various biological activities. The properties of propolis can vary widely by [...] Read more.
Propolis is a valuable natural substance obtained by honey bees after being collected from the bark, resin of trees, plant leaves and mixed with their saliva, and has been widely used for various biological activities. The properties of propolis can vary widely by botanical origin, location of the hives and colony population. It is thought that the color of propolis is one of the main factors determining its acceptability and originates from the flower markers, pollen and nectar of some plants and is directly related to its chemical content. It is important to compare and standardize the colors, chemical content and biological activities of propolis in our country, which has a rich endemic plant diversity. Thus, in this study, the color indexes of 39 propolis samples from different locations in Turkiye were determined by Lovibond Tintometer, for the first time. The color index, total phenolic content, cytotoxic and antioxidant activities relationship of propolis and two commercial propolis samples were also investigated by HCA and PCA. Turkish propolis, which is defined by its color indices, chemical contents and many different activity potentials, such as antioxidant, antiviral and cytotoxic activity, will find use in many fields from medicine to cosmetics with this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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18 pages, 2959 KiB  
Article
¹H-NMR Metabolic Profiling, Antioxidant Activity, and Docking Study of Common Medicinal Plant-Derived Honey
by Maha Montaser, Asmaa T. Ali, Ahmed M. Sayed, Usama Ramadan Abdelmohsen, Ehab W. Zidan, Raha Orfali, Mostafa E. Rateb, Mohamed A. Zaki, Hossam M. Hassan, Rabab Mohammed and Mohamed S. Hifnawy
Antioxidants 2022, 11(10), 1880; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11101880 - 22 Sep 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2404
Abstract
The purpose of this investigation was to determine ¹H-NMR profiling and antioxidant activity of the most common types of honey, namely, citrus honey (HC1) (Morcott tangerine L. and Jaffa orange L.), marjoram honey (HM1) (Origanum majorana L.), and clover honey (HT1) [...] Read more.
The purpose of this investigation was to determine ¹H-NMR profiling and antioxidant activity of the most common types of honey, namely, citrus honey (HC1) (Morcott tangerine L. and Jaffa orange L.), marjoram honey (HM1) (Origanum majorana L.), and clover honey (HT1) (Trifolium alexandrinum L.), compared to their secondary metabolites (HC2, HM2, HT2, respectively). By using a ¹H-NMR-based metabolomic technique, PCA, and PLS-DA multivariate analysis, we found that HC2, HM2, HC1, and HM1 were clustered together. However, HT1 and HT2 were quite far from these and each other. This indicated that HC1, HM1, HC2, and HM2 have similar chemical compositions, while HT1 and HT2 were unique in their chemical profiles. Antioxidation potentials were determined colorimetrically for scavenging activities against DPPH, ABTS, ORAC, 5-LOX, and metal chelating activity in all honey extract samples and their secondary metabolites. Our results revealed that HC2 and HM2 possessed more antioxidant activities than HT2 in vitro. HC2 demonstrated the highest antioxidant effect in all assays, followed by HM2 (DPPH assay: IC50 2.91, 10.7 μg/mL; ABTS assay: 431.2, 210.24 at 50 ug/mL Trolox equivalent; ORAC assay: 259.5, 234.8 at 50 ug/mL Trolox equivalent; 5-LOX screening assay/IC50: 2.293, 6.136 ug/mL; and metal chelating activity at 50 ug/mL: 73.34526%, 63.75881% inhibition). We suggest that the presence of some secondary metabolites in HC and HM, such as hesperetin, linalool, and caffeic acid, increased the antioxidant activity in citrus and marjoram compared to clover honey. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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21 pages, 2668 KiB  
Article
Kelulut Honey Ameliorates Oestrus Cycle, Hormonal Profiles, and Oxidative Stress in Letrozole-Induced Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Rats
by Datu Agasi Mohd Kamal, Siti Fatimah Ibrahim, Azizah Ugusman and Mohd Helmy Mokhtar
Antioxidants 2022, 11(10), 1879; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11101879 - 22 Sep 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2823
Abstract
Kelulut honey (KH) has been proven to have excellent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties with unique physicochemical characteristics. Therefore, we investigated the isolated and combined effects of KH, metformin, or clomiphene in alleviating oxidative stress and reproductive and metabolic abnormalities in polycystic ovary syndrome [...] Read more.
Kelulut honey (KH) has been proven to have excellent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties with unique physicochemical characteristics. Therefore, we investigated the isolated and combined effects of KH, metformin, or clomiphene in alleviating oxidative stress and reproductive and metabolic abnormalities in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were given 1 mg/kg/day of letrozole for 21 days to induce PCOS. PCOS rats were then divided into six treatment groups: untreated, metformin (500 mg/kg/day), clomiphene (2 mg/kg/day), KH (1 g/kg/day), combined KH (1 g/kg/day) and metformin (500 mg/kg/day), and combined KH (1 g/kg/day) and clomiphene (2 mg/kg/day). All treatments were administered orally for 35 days. The physicochemical characteristics of KH were assessed through hydroxymethylfurfural, free acidity, diastase number, moisture content, sugar profile, metals, and mineral compounds. Additionally, we determined the semivolatile organic compounds present in KH through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. KH and its combination with metformin or clomiphene were shown to improve the oestrus cycle, hormonal profile, and oxidative stress in PCOS rats. However, KH did not reduce the fasting blood glucose, insulin, and body weight gain in PCOS rats. These findings may provide a basis for future studies to discover the potential use of KH as a complementary treatment for women with PCOS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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19 pages, 5171 KiB  
Article
Content of Phenolic Acids as a Marker of Polish Honey Varieties and Relationship with Selected Honey-Quality-Influencing Variables
by Anna Puścion-Jakubik, Elżbieta Karpińska, Justyna Moskwa and Katarzyna Socha
Antioxidants 2022, 11(7), 1312; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11071312 - 30 Jun 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1612
Abstract
Phenolic acids are an important component of honey. Literature data indicate their pro-health properties and diversified content in different varieties. Therefore, the aim of our study was to evaluate the content of phenolic acids in bee honey. The material for the research was [...] Read more.
Phenolic acids are an important component of honey. Literature data indicate their pro-health properties and diversified content in different varieties. Therefore, the aim of our study was to evaluate the content of phenolic acids in bee honey. The material for the research was 49 samples of honey obtained from beekeepers from Poland. Selected phenolic acids were determined by HPLC with PDA detection. Additionally, total phenolic content (TPC), color intensity, color on the Pfund scale, water content, electrical conductivity, and FRAP were assessed. A higher trans-ferulic acid content is accompanied by a stronger free radical scavenging ability. It was shown that buckwheat honeys are characterized by a high TPC value (196.59 mg GAE/100 g), color intensity (2109.2 mAU), color on the Pfund scale (159.8 mm Pfund), and high activity in the FRAP assay (0.403 equivalent of µmol Fe2+/mL). The median obtained in the DPPH test for this honey variety was 41.1%. Moreover, the highest median of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (3.129 mg/100 g) in buckwheat honey was shown. Buckwheat honeys have promising antioxidant properties and should be included in diets low in antioxidants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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17 pages, 3087 KiB  
Article
Polish and New Zealand Propolis as Sources of Antioxidant Compounds Inhibit Glioblastoma (T98G, LN-18) Cell Lines and Astrocytoma Cells Derived from Patient
by Justyna Moskwa, Sylwia Katarzyna Naliwajko, Renata Markiewicz-Żukowska, Krystyna Joanna Gromkowska-Kępka, Jolanta Soroczyńska, Anna Puścion-Jakubik, Maria Halina Borawska, Valery Isidorov and Katarzyna Socha
Antioxidants 2022, 11(7), 1305; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11071305 - 29 Jun 2022
Viewed by 1912
Abstract
Gliomas, including glioblastoma multiforme and astrocytoma, are common brain cancers in adults. Propolis is a natural product containing many active ingredients. The aim of this study was to compare the chemical composition, total phenolic content and concentration of toxic elements as well as [...] Read more.
Gliomas, including glioblastoma multiforme and astrocytoma, are common brain cancers in adults. Propolis is a natural product containing many active ingredients. The aim of this study was to compare the chemical composition, total phenolic content and concentration of toxic elements as well as the anticancer potential of Polish (PPE) and New Zealand (Manuka—MPE) propolis extracts on diffuse astrocytoma derived from patient (DASC) and glioblastoma (T98G, LN-18) cell lines. The antioxidants such as flavonoids and chalcones (pinocembrin, pinobanksin, pinobanksin 3-acetate and chrysin) were the main components in both types of propolis. The content of arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) in MPE was higher than PPE. The anti-proliferative study showed strong activity of PPE and MPE propolis on DASC, T98G, and LN-18 cells by apoptosis induction, cell cycle arrest and attenuated migration. These findings suggest that despite their different geographic origins, Polish and New Zealand propolis are sources of antioxidant compounds and show similar activity and a promising anti-glioma potential in in vitro study. However, further in vivo studies are required in order to assess therapeutic potential of propolis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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15 pages, 2945 KiB  
Article
Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Apoptotic, and Antioxidant Roles of Honey, Royal Jelly, and Propolis in Suppressing Nephrotoxicity Induced by Doxorubicin in Male Albino Rats
by Hanaa K. Mohamed, Maysa A. Mobasher, Rasha A. Ebiya, Marwa T. Hassen, Howaida M. Hagag, Radwa El-Sayed, Shaimaa Abdel-Ghany, Manal M. Said and Nabil S. Awad
Antioxidants 2022, 11(5), 1029; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11051029 - 23 May 2022
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3114
Abstract
Nephrotoxicity is one of the limiting factors for using doxorubicin (DOX). Honey, propolis, and royal jelly were evaluated for their ability to protect against nephrotoxicity caused by DOX. Forty-two adult albino rats were divided into control groups. The DOX group was injected i.p. [...] Read more.
Nephrotoxicity is one of the limiting factors for using doxorubicin (DOX). Honey, propolis, and royal jelly were evaluated for their ability to protect against nephrotoxicity caused by DOX. Forty-two adult albino rats were divided into control groups. The DOX group was injected i.p. with a weekly dose of 3 mg/kg of DOX for six weeks. The DOX plus honey treated group was injected with DOX and on the next day, received 500 mg/kg/day of honey orally for 21 days. The DOX plus royal jelly treated group was injected with DOX and on the following day, received 100 mg/kg/day of royal jelly orally for 21 days. The DOX plus propolis treated group received DOX and on the following day, was treated orally with 50 mg/kg/day of propolis for 21 days. The DOX plus combined treatment group received DOX and on the following day, was treated with a mix of honey, royal jelly, and propolis orally for 21 days. Results confirmed that DOX raised creatinine, urea, MDA, and TNF-α while decreasing GPX and SOD. Damages and elevated caspase-3 expression were discovered during renal tissue’s histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. Combined treatment with honey, royal jelly, and propolis improved biochemical, histological, and immunohistochemical studies in the renal tissue. qRT-PCR revealed increased expression of poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and a decline of Bcl-2 in the DOX group. However, combined treatment induced a significant decrease in the PARP-1 gene and increased Bcl-2 expression levels. In addition, the combined treatment led to significant improvement in the expression of both PARP-1 and Bcl-2 genes. In conclusion, the combined treatment effectively inhibited nephrotoxicity induced by DOX. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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18 pages, 3454 KiB  
Article
Antioxidant Effects of Korean Propolis in HaCaT Keratinocytes Exposed to Particulate Matter 10
by In Ah Bae, Jae Won Ha, Joon Yong Choi and Yong Chool Boo
Antioxidants 2022, 11(4), 781; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox11040781 - 14 Apr 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2527
Abstract
Air pollution causes oxidative stress that leads to inflammatory diseases and premature aging of the skin. The purpose of this study was to examine the antioxidant effect of Korean propolis on oxidative stress in human epidermal HaCaT keratinocytes exposed to particulate matter with [...] Read more.
Air pollution causes oxidative stress that leads to inflammatory diseases and premature aging of the skin. The purpose of this study was to examine the antioxidant effect of Korean propolis on oxidative stress in human epidermal HaCaT keratinocytes exposed to particulate matter with a diameter of less than 10 μm (PM10). The total ethanol extract of propolis was solvent-fractionated with water and methylene chloride to divide into a hydrophilic fraction and a lipophilic fraction. The lipophilic fraction of propolis was slightly more cytotoxic, and the hydrophilic fraction was much less cytotoxic than the total extract. The hydrophilic fraction did not affect the viability of cells exposed to PM10, but the total propolis extract and the lipophilic fraction aggravated the toxicity of PM10. The total extract and hydrophilic fraction inhibited PM10-induced ROS production and lipid peroxidation in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the lipophilic fraction did not show such effects. High-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (HPLC-DAD) analysis showed that the hydrophilic fraction contained phenylpropanoids, such as caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, and ferulic acid, whereas the lipophilic faction contained caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE). The former three compounds inhibited PM10-induced ROS production, lipid peroxidation, and/or glutathione oxidation, and ferulic acid was the most effective among them, but CAPE exhibited cytotoxicity and aggravated the toxicity of PM10. This study suggests that Korean propolis, when properly purified, has the potential to be used as a cosmetic material that helps to alleviate the skin toxicity of air pollutants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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31 pages, 1438 KiB  
Review
Exploring the Potential of Bee-Derived Antioxidants for Maintaining Oral Hygiene and Dental Health: A Comprehensive Review
by Poonam Choudhary, Surya Tushir, Manju Bala, Sanjula Sharma, Manjeet Kaur Sangha, Heena Rani, Nileshwari Raju Yewle, Parminder Kumar, Diksha Singla, Deepak Chandran, Manoj Kumar and Mohamed Mekhemar
Antioxidants 2023, 12(7), 1452; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12071452 - 19 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2248
Abstract
Honey bee products comprise various compounds, including honey, propolis, royal jelly, bee pollen, bee wax and bee venom, which have long been recognized for their pharmacological and health-promoting benefits. Scientists have discovered that periodontal disorders stem from dental biofilm, an inflammatory response to [...] Read more.
Honey bee products comprise various compounds, including honey, propolis, royal jelly, bee pollen, bee wax and bee venom, which have long been recognized for their pharmacological and health-promoting benefits. Scientists have discovered that periodontal disorders stem from dental biofilm, an inflammatory response to bacterial overgrowth produced by dysbiosis in the oral microbiome. The bee products have been investigated for their role in prevention of oral diseases, which are attributed to a myriad of biologically active compounds including flavonoids (pinocembrin, catechin, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and galangin), phenolic acids (hydroxybenzoic acid, hydroxycinnamic acid, p-coumaric, ellagic, caffeic and ferulic acids) and terpenoids. This review aims to update the current understanding of role of selected bee products, namely, honey, propolis and royal jelly, in preventing oral diseases as well as their potential biological activities and mechanism of action in relation to oral health have been discussed. Furthermore, the safety of incorporation of bee products is also critically discussed. To summarize, bee products could potentially serve as a therapy option for people suffering from a variety of oral disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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15 pages, 1998 KiB  
Review
Honey: A Promising Therapeutic Supplement for the Prevention and Management of Osteoporosis and Breast Cancer
by Monika Martiniakova, Veronika Kovacova, Vladimira Mondockova, Nina Zemanova, Martina Babikova, Roman Biro, Sona Ciernikova and Radoslav Omelka
Antioxidants 2023, 12(3), 567; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12030567 - 24 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 7949
Abstract
Osteoporosis and breast cancer are serious diseases that have become a significant socioeconomic burden. There are biochemical associations between the two disorders in terms of the amended function of estrogen, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa beta ligand, oxidative stress, inflammation, and lipid [...] Read more.
Osteoporosis and breast cancer are serious diseases that have become a significant socioeconomic burden. There are biochemical associations between the two disorders in terms of the amended function of estrogen, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa beta ligand, oxidative stress, inflammation, and lipid accumulation. Honey as a functional food with high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties can contribute to the prevention of various diseases. Its health benefits are mainly related to the content of polyphenols. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge from in vitro, animal, and human studies on the use of honey as a potential therapeutic agent for osteoporosis and breast cancer. Preclinical studies have revealed a beneficial impact of honey on both bone health (microstructure, strength, oxidative stress) and breast tissue health (breast cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis, tumor growth rate, and volume). The limited number of clinical trials, especially in osteoporosis, indicates the need for further research to evaluate the potential benefits of honey in the treatment. Clinical studies related to breast cancer have revealed that honey is effective in increasing blood cell counts, interleukin-3 levels, and quality of life. In summary, honey may serve as a prospective therapeutic supplement for bone and breast tissue health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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31 pages, 900 KiB  
Review
Bee Pollen as Functional Food: Insights into Its Composition and Therapeutic Properties
by Asmae El Ghouizi, Meryem Bakour, Hassan Laaroussi, Driss Ousaaid, Naoual El Menyiy, Christophe Hano and Badiaa Lyoussi
Antioxidants 2023, 12(3), 557; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12030557 - 23 Feb 2023
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 7928
Abstract
Bee pollen is a hive product made up of flower pollen grains, nectar, and bee salivary secretions that beekeepers can collect without damaging the hive. Bee pollen, also called bee-collected pollen, contains a wide range of nutritious elements, including proteins, carbs, lipids, and [...] Read more.
Bee pollen is a hive product made up of flower pollen grains, nectar, and bee salivary secretions that beekeepers can collect without damaging the hive. Bee pollen, also called bee-collected pollen, contains a wide range of nutritious elements, including proteins, carbs, lipids, and dietary fibers, as well as bioactive micronutrients including vitamins, minerals, phenolic, and volatile compounds. Because of this composition of high quality, this product has been gaining prominence as a functional food, and studies have been conducted to show and establish its therapeutic potential for medical and food applications. In this context, this work aimed to provide a meticulous summary of the most relevant data about bee pollen, its composition—especially the phenolic compounds—and its biological and/or therapeutic properties as well as the involved molecular pathways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidant Activity of Honey Bee Products)
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