Effect of Oxidative Stress on Reproduction and Development—2nd Edition

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Outcomes of Antioxidants and Oxidative Stress".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 2156

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Interdepartmental Research Center for Environment, IECEnv (CIRAm), University of Naples Federico II, 80134 Naples, Italy
Interests: climate change and reprotoxicity; antioxidative physiological defense; steroids and steroid receptors; antioxidants under steroid control; reproductive health assessment; endangered species and validation of non-destructive examination methods; biodiversity conservation microassay
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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Science, Complesso Monte S. Angelo, Via Cinthia 4, 80126 Naples, Italy
Interests: oxidative stress monitoring; reactive oxygen species; analytical and physico-chemical methods; electron paramagnetic resonance; non-invasive environmental monitoring; spectroscopic methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Our previous Special Issue on "Effect of Oxidative Stress on Reproduction and Development" (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/antioxidants/special_issues/oxidative_stress_reproduction), published in the 2021 volume of Antioxidants, received an overwhelming number of submissions and was a successful compilation of research and review articles. As this is a rapidly evolving topic, we would like to explore the role of oxidative stress in reproduction health further with a follow-up Special Issue for 2023–2024.

By inducing physiological and reproductive disorders, stressors determine failures in various cellular processes, such as development, differentiation, growth, regeneration, and regression, threatening the survival of the living species. Although a definite role of free radicals and antioxidants is well-established, there is sparse knowledge of their role in a multitude of stressors, such as climate change, temperature fluctuations, osmotic stress, alterations in oxygen availability, and other anthropogenic impacts, all factors that can directly affect free radical overexpression during reproduction. Therefore, we cordially invite authors to contribute to this Special Issue with original research articles and reviews on animal and vegetal reproduction. Critical and objective perspectives on hormones and vitamins and on factors that limit or facilitate fertility and fertilization also fall within the scope of this Special Issue. Data collected on this issue may represent a new opportunity to answer basic questions on one-health conservation and sustainability and indicate how we can perform assessments by oxidant and/or antioxidant detection.

Dr. Giulia Guerriero
Prof. Dr. Gerardino D’Errico
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • free radicals and antioxidants
  • oxidative stress
  • thermal fertility limit (TFL)
  • climate change
  • one-health
  • biodiversity conservation and sustainability
  • reproduction
  • development and nutrigenomics
  • methods for reactive oxygen species detection and antioxidant property determination
  • investigations on the mechanism of action of new antioxidants under steroid control

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 499 KiB  
Article
Micronutrient Antioxidants for Men (Menevit®) Improve Sperm Function by Reducing Oxidative Stress, Resulting in Improved Assisted Reproductive Technology Outcomes
by Seiji Ogawa, Kuniaki Ota, Kaori Nishizawa, Masumi Shinagawa, Mikiko Katagiri, Hiroyuki Kikuchi, Hideyuki Kobayashi, Toshifumi Takahashi and Hiroaki Yoshida
Antioxidants 2024, 13(6), 635; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox13060635 - 23 May 2024
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Abstract
Oxidative stress (OS) affects men’s health and impairs spermatogenesis. Micronutrient antioxidants are available for male infertility as complemental support; however, their efficacy remains debatable. This study aimed to investigate whether antioxidants can help to reduce sperm OS and improve semen analysis and quality. [...] Read more.
Oxidative stress (OS) affects men’s health and impairs spermatogenesis. Micronutrient antioxidants are available for male infertility as complemental support; however, their efficacy remains debatable. This study aimed to investigate whether antioxidants can help to reduce sperm OS and improve semen analysis and quality. We included 171 male partners of couples planning to undergo assisted reproductive technology (ART). Male partners, aged 29–41 years, of couples intending to conceive were self-selected to take daily antioxidants (n = 84) containing folic acid and zinc, or not to take antioxidants (n = 52) for 6 months. We analyzed the alterations in serum oxidant levels, sperm parameters, OS, and deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation after 3 and 6 months. Additionally, implantation, clinical pregnancy, and miscarriage rates after vitrified–warmed embryo transfer were compared between those taking antioxidants and those not taking them after 6 months. In men with high static oxidation–reduction potential (sORP), we observed a significant improvement in sperm concentration and sORP. The high-quality blastocyst rate tended to increase, and implantation and clinical pregnancy rates also significantly increased after 6 months of intervention. The micronutrient antioxidants could improve sperm function by reducing OS and improving ART outcomes. Therefore, micronutrient antioxidants may be a viable treatment option for male infertility. Full article
18 pages, 15335 KiB  
Article
LanCL2 Implicates in Testicular Redox Homeostasis and Acrosomal Maturation
by Yanling Zhao, Jichen Wang, Shuai Shi, Xinting Lan, Xiangyu Cheng, Lixia Li, Yuanfeng Zou, Lanlan Jia, Wentao Liu, Qihui Luo, Zhengli Chen and Chao Huang
Antioxidants 2024, 13(5), 534; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox13050534 - 27 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Redox balance plays an important role in testicular homeostasis. While lots of antioxidant molecules have been identified as widely expressed, the understanding of the critical mechanisms for redox management in male germ cells is inadequate. This study identified LanCL2 as a major male [...] Read more.
Redox balance plays an important role in testicular homeostasis. While lots of antioxidant molecules have been identified as widely expressed, the understanding of the critical mechanisms for redox management in male germ cells is inadequate. This study identified LanCL2 as a major male germ cell-specific antioxidant gene that is important for testicular homeostasis. Highly expressed in the brain and testis, LanCL2 expression correlates with testicular maturation and brain development. LanCL2 is enriched in spermatocytes and round spermatids of the testis. By examining LanCL2 knockout mice, we found that LanCL2 deletion did not affect postnatal brain development but injured the sperm parameters of adult mice. With histopathological analysis, we noticed that LanCL2 KO caused a pre-maturation and accelerated the self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells in the early stage of spermatogenesis. In contrast, at the adult stage, LanCL2 KO damaged the acrosomal maturation in spermiogenesis, resulting in spermatogenic defects with a reduced number and motility of spermatozoa. Furthermore, we show that this disruption of testicular homeostasis in the LanCL2 KO testis was due to dysbalanced testicular redox homeostasis. This study demonstrates the critical role of LanCL2 in testicular homeostasis and redox balance. Full article
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0 pages, 7388 KiB  
Article
Two-Generation Toxicity Study of the Antioxidant Compound Propyl-Propane Thiosulfonate (PTSO)
by Antonio Cascajosa-Lira, Remedios Guzmán-Guillén, Silvia Pichardo, Alberto Baños, Jose M. de la Torre, Nahum Ayala-Soldado, M. Rosario Moyano-Salvago, Isabel Ortiz-Jaraba, Ana M. Cameán and Angeles Jos
Antioxidants 2024, 13(3), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox13030350 - 15 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Propyl-propane thiosulfonate (PTSO), an antioxidant organosulfur compound present in the genus Allium, has become a potential natural additive for food and feed, as well as a possible biopesticide for pest control in plants. A toxicological assessment is necessary to verify its safety [...] Read more.
Propyl-propane thiosulfonate (PTSO), an antioxidant organosulfur compound present in the genus Allium, has become a potential natural additive for food and feed, as well as a possible biopesticide for pest control in plants. A toxicological assessment is necessary to verify its safety for livestock, consumers, and the environment. As part of the risk assessment of PTSO, this study was designed to explore its potential reproductive toxicity in mice following the OECD 416 guideline. The investigation spans two generations to comprehensively evaluate potential reproductive, teratogenic, and hereditary effects. A total of 80 CD1 mice per sex and generation were subjected to PTSO exposure during three phases (premating, gestation, and lactation). This evaluation encompassed three dose levels: 14, 28, and 55 mg PTSO/kg b.w./day, administered through the feed. No clinical changes or mortality attributed to the administration of PTSO were observed in the study. Some changes in the body weight and food consumption were observed, but not related to sex or in a dose-dependent manner. The two parental generations (F0, F1) exhibited normal reproductive performance, and the offspring (F1 and F2) were born without any abnormalities. The serum sexual hormone levels (progesterone -P-, testosterone -T-, estradiol -E2-, follicular stimulating hormone -FSH-, and luteinizing hormone -LH-) were in a normal range. Although significant changes were observed in the sperm analysis in the case of F0 group, no variation was found for F1 group, and no alterations in fertility were recorded either. The absolute organ weights and relative organ weight/body weight and organ weight/brain weight ratios, and the complete histopathological study, showed no significant alterations in males and females for all the generations considered. Considering all the results obtained, PTSO is not considered a reproductive or developmental toxicant in mice under the assayed conditions. These results support the good safety profile of PTSO for its potential application in the agrifood sector. Full article
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