Flavonoids and Chronic Diseases - 2nd Edition

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Outcomes of Antioxidants and Oxidative Stress".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 5985

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Food and Nutrition, College of BioNano Technology, Gachon University, 1342 Seongnam-dae ro, Sujeong-gu, Seongnam-si 13120, Republic of Korea
Interests: bioactive compounds; phytochemicals; antioxidants; inflammation; brown cell; chronic diseases; in vitro mechanism; animal model; clinical trials; epidemiological study; systemic review
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Guest Editor
Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Seongnam 13120, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea
Interests: functional foods; phytoconstituents; anti-inflammation; oxidative stress; in vitro and in vivo studies; signaling mechanisms

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to contribute to a Special Issue of Antioxidants, “Flavonoids and Chronic Diseases II”.

Flavonoids belong to polyphenols and are widely distributed in nature, such as fruits, vegetables, and tea. More than 9000 different flavonoid compounds have been described in plants, which play an important biological role by influencing various developmental processes. Flavonoids are divided into many subclasses: anthocyanidins, flavanols, flavanones, flavonols, flavones, and isoflavones. It is well known that flavonoids have antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic effects in in vivo and in vitro studies. Nevertheless, we must continuously discover the effects of individual compounds or food extracts rich in flavonoids throughout various evidence levels such as in vivo, epidemiology, clinical trials, and systemic reviews.

As a dietary component, flavonoids are thought to have health-promoting properties due to their high antioxidant capacity in both in vivo and in vitro systems. Flavonoids have the ability to induce human protective enzyme systems. A number of studies have suggested the protective effects of flavonoids against many infectious (bacterial and viral diseases) and degenerative diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancers, and other age-related diseases.

Prof. Dr. Hae-Jeung Lee
Dr. Anshul Sharma
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • flavonoids
  • anti-oxidative
  • anti-inflammatory
  • anti-carcinogenic
  • degenerative diseases
  • chronic diseases
  • molecular mechanism
  • signaling pathways

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 10360 KiB  
Article
Elaeagnus umbellata Fruit Extract Protects Skin from Ultraviolet-Mediated Photoaging in Hairless Mice
by Seok-Man Park, Cheol-Jong Jung, Dae-Geon Lee, Yeong-Eun Yu, Tae-Hun Ku, Mu-Seok Hong, Tae-Kyung Lim, Kwong-Il Paeng, Hyun-Ki Cho, Il-Je Cho and Sae-Kwang Ku
Antioxidants 2024, 13(2), 195; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox13020195 - 03 Feb 2024
Viewed by 823
Abstract
Photoaging refers to the accumulation of skin damage which includes wrinkle formation, loss of elasticity, and epidermal thickening due to repeated ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The present study investigated the protective effects of Elaeagnus umbellata fruit extract (Elaea) on UV-mediated photoaged skin of SKH1 [...] Read more.
Photoaging refers to the accumulation of skin damage which includes wrinkle formation, loss of elasticity, and epidermal thickening due to repeated ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The present study investigated the protective effects of Elaeagnus umbellata fruit extract (Elaea) on UV-mediated photoaged skin of SKH1 hairless mice and compared the effects of Elaea with ascorbic acid. Although there was no difference in body weight between groups during experimental period, oral administration of 50–200 mg/kg Elaea once daily for 15 weeks significantly prevented an increase in skin weight, epithelial thickening of epidermis, and apoptosis caused by UV irradiation. Skin replica and histopathological analyses revealed that Elaea dose-dependently decreased wrinkle and microfold formation. In addition, Elaea administration restored UV-mediated reduction in type I collagen and hyaluronan through the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase expression. Moreover, Elaea suppressed UV-dependent increases in superoxide anion production, fatty acid oxidation, and protein nitration by up-regulating antioxidant system. Furthermore, Elaea alleviated infiltration of inflammatory cells in UV-irradiated skin. The preventive effects of 100 mg/kg Elaea administration against UV-induced photoaging were similar to those by 100 mg/kg ascorbic acid. Collectively, the present study suggests that the E. umbellata fruit is a promising edible candidate to prevent skin photoaging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flavonoids and Chronic Diseases - 2nd Edition)
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25 pages, 5738 KiB  
Article
Validating the Health Benefits of Coffee Berry Pulp Extracts in Mice with High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity and Diabetes
by Khawaja Muhammad Imran Bashir, Joo Wan Kim, Hye-Rim Park, Jae-Kyoung Lee, Beom-Rak Choi, Jae-Suk Choi and Sae-Kwang Ku
Antioxidants 2024, 13(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox13010010 - 20 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1085
Abstract
The effects of coffee (Coffea arabica L.) berry pulp extracts (CBP extracts) on the improvement of diabetes, obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) were evaluated using various in vitro antioxidant activity assays and through a high-fat diet-induced mild diabetic obese mouse [...] Read more.
The effects of coffee (Coffea arabica L.) berry pulp extracts (CBP extracts) on the improvement of diabetes, obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) were evaluated using various in vitro antioxidant activity assays and through a high-fat diet-induced mild diabetic obese mouse model. After an 84-day oral administration of CBP extracts (400–100 mg/kg), bioactivities were evaluated. The in vitro analysis showed the highest DPPH scavenging activity of 73.10 ± 4.27%, ABTS scavenging activity of 41.18 ± 1.14%, and SOD activity of 56.24 ± 2.81%, at a CBP extract concentration of 1000 µg/mL. The in vivo analysis of the CBP extracts showed favorable and dose-dependent anti-obesity, anti-diabetic, NAFLD, nephropathy, and hyperlipidemia refinement effects through hepatic glucose enzyme activity, 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) up-regulation, antioxidant activity, lipid metabolism-related gene expression, and pancreatic lipid digestion enzyme modulatory activities. This study shows that an appropriate oral dosage of CBP extracts could function as a potent herbal formulation for a refinement agent or medicinal food ingredient to control type 2 diabetes and related complications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flavonoids and Chronic Diseases - 2nd Edition)
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20 pages, 5104 KiB  
Article
Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase and Amyloid-β Aggregation by Piceatannol and Analogs: Assessing In Vitro and In Vivo Impact on a Murine Model of Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment
by Yi-Yan Sie, Liang-Chieh Chen, Cai-Jhen Li, Yu-Hsiang Yuan, Sheng-Hung Hsiao, Mei-Hsien Lee, Ching-Chiung Wang and Wen-Chi Hou
Antioxidants 2023, 12(7), 1362; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12071362 - 29 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1938
Abstract
Currently, no drug is effective in delaying the cognitive impairment of Alzheimer’s disease, which ranks as one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide. Hydroxylated stilbenes are active compounds that exist in fruit and herbal plants. Piceatannol (PIC) and gnetol (GNT), which [...] Read more.
Currently, no drug is effective in delaying the cognitive impairment of Alzheimer’s disease, which ranks as one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide. Hydroxylated stilbenes are active compounds that exist in fruit and herbal plants. Piceatannol (PIC) and gnetol (GNT), which have one extra hydroxyl group in comparison to resveratrol (RSV), and rhapontigenin (RHA) and isorhapontigenin (isoRHA), which were metabolized from PIC in vivo and contain the same number of hydroxyl groups as RSV, were evaluated for their effects on Alzheimer’s disease-associated factors in vitro and in animal experiments. Among the five hydroxylated stilbenes, PIC was shown to be the most active in DPPH radical scavenging and in inhibitory activities against acetylcholinesterase and amyloid-β peptide aggregations, with concentrations for half-maximal inhibitions of 40.2, 271.74, and 0.48 μM. The different interactions of the five hydroxylated stilbenes with acetylcholinesterase or amyloid-β were obtained by molecular docking. The scopolamine-induced ICR mice fed with PIC (50 mg/kg) showed an improved learning behavior in the passive avoidance tests and had significant differences (p < 0.05) compared with those in the control group. The RHA and isoRHA at 10 μM were proven to stimulate neurite outgrowths in the SH-SY5Y cell models. These results reveal that nutraceuticals or functional foods containing PIC have the potential for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flavonoids and Chronic Diseases - 2nd Edition)
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17 pages, 4314 KiB  
Article
Adenophora Stricta Root Extract Alleviates Airway Inflammation in Mice with Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Asthma
by Cheol-Jong Jung, Seok-Man Park, Dae-Geon Lee, Yeong-Eun Yu, Tae-Hun Ku, Im-Joung La, Il-Je Cho and Sae-Kwang Ku
Antioxidants 2023, 12(4), 922; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12040922 - 13 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1597
Abstract
Adenophora stricta Miq. (Campanulaceae family) is a traditional herb used for relieving cough and phlegm in East Asia. This study explored the effects of A. stricta root extract (AsE) in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. Administration of 100–400 mg/kg [...] Read more.
Adenophora stricta Miq. (Campanulaceae family) is a traditional herb used for relieving cough and phlegm in East Asia. This study explored the effects of A. stricta root extract (AsE) in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. Administration of 100–400 mg/kg AsE dose-dependently decreased pulmonary congestion and suppressed the reduction of alveolar surface area in mice with OVA-mediated allergic asthma. Histopathological analysis of lung tissue and cytological analysis of bronchioalveolar lavage fluid showed that AsE administration significantly attenuated inflammatory cell infiltration into the lungs. In addition, AsE also alleviated OVA-specific immunoglobulin E, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-5 production, which are essential for OVA-dependent activation of T helper 2 lymphocytes. In Raw264.7 macrophage cells, AsE significantly blocked nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant factor-1 production in response to LPS. Results from an immunoblot assay revealed that AsE inhibited the phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase, inhibitory-κB kinase α/β, and p65 in LPS-stimulated cells. Furthermore, 2-furoic acid, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, and vanillic acid 4-β-D-glucopyranoside in AsE were shown to inhibit the production of proinflammatory mediators by LPS. Taken together, the present results suggest that A. stricta root will be a useful herb for relieving allergic asthma through managing airway inflammation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flavonoids and Chronic Diseases - 2nd Edition)
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