Dietary Antioxidants and Cosmetics—2nd Edition

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural and Synthetic Antioxidants".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2024) | Viewed by 5475

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Green cosmetics are a new focus in the beauty sector. The word “green” is synonymous with "sustainable",  "organic" and "healthy". Consumers' apprehension about the environment and interest in healthy lifestyles increased with time; they prefer natural health and beauty products considered safe and obtained using methods that have a low environmental impact instead of chemicals considered insidious for the human health and well-being of the planet. The indications of the European Commission promote the reuse of various organic biomasses and organic wastes in different productive sectors. Scientific reports highlight the positive potential of bioactive compounds (e.g., antioxidants) derived from renewable sources (e.g., agri-food residues and plants) as bioactive compounds in cosmetics. Some agro-food wastes and process byproduct molecules have been tested for antioxidant and photoprotective activity against UVB radiation. Numerous extraction methods were developed to recover valuable bioactive compounds from agro-waste for application in different industries. Nevertheless, the number of products available on the market obtained through agro-waste is still somewhat limited. Researching technologies and methods to obtain raw materials from waste allows us to step toward a sustainable economy. This Special Issue collects reviews and research articles on dietary antioxidant applications in cosmetics. The topics of interest are:  

  1. The isolation, characterization and dosage of antioxidants in food or organic waste;
  2. An estimation of the food antioxidant cosmetic properties;
  3. Industrial applications of bioactive compounds obtained from renewable sources in cosmetics;
  4. An evaluation of food antioxidant delivery system performance;
  5. An evaluation of food antioxidant toxicity in cosmetic formulations.

Prof. Dr. Irene Dini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • antioxidant activity
  • phenolic compounds
  • isolation and characterization
  • metabolomics
  • delivery systems
  • cosmetic supplements
  • food supplements
  • functional foods
  • cosmeceuticals
  • genetically modified food
  • toxicological properties
  • biological activities
  • recycling
  • green economy
  • circular economy

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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24 pages, 2710 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Azorean Plant Leaves for Sustainable Valorization and Future Advanced Applications in the Food, Cosmetic, and Pharmaceutical Industries
by Jorge Gomes Lopes Barros, Raquel Fernandes, Ana Abraão, Rui Dias Costa, Alfredo Aires, Irene Gouvinhas, Daniel Granato and Ana Novo Barros
Antioxidants 2024, 13(3), 325; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox13030325 - 06 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1342
Abstract
The historical use of plants as sources of natural compounds has persisted over time. Increasing the intake of bioactive substances shows significant potential for promoting overall well-being and health. This study delves into the pigments, phenolic composition, and profile, along with antioxidant properties, [...] Read more.
The historical use of plants as sources of natural compounds has persisted over time. Increasing the intake of bioactive substances shows significant potential for promoting overall well-being and health. This study delves into the pigments, phenolic composition, and profile, along with antioxidant properties, of leaf extracts rich in bioactives from plants in the Azores region, contributing to sustainable primary food production. Analyses encompassed chlorophylls, carotenoids, total phenols, ortho-diphenols, and flavonoids, as well as antioxidant capacity assessment, polyphenolic profiling, and quantification. Psidium guajava L. and Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp.) H.Rob. exhibited elevated chlorophyll content, while Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott displayed the highest carotenoid levels. Annona cherimola Mill., Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl, and Psidium guajava L. demonstrated pronounced total phenols, ortho-diphenols, and flavonoids. These findings align with heightened antioxidant capacity. HPLC–DAD (high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection) characterization unveiled elevated hydroxycinnamic acids in E. japonica and Ipomea batatas (L.) Lam. compared to A. cherimola Mill., while C. esculenta exhibited increased flavone content. Among the quantified compounds, flavonols were the ones that predominantly demonstrated contribution to the antioxidant capacity of these leaves. This research highlights Azorean leaf plants’ antioxidant potential, fostering natural product development for better health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Antioxidants and Cosmetics—2nd Edition)
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10 pages, 3382 KiB  
Article
Ascorbic Acid Treatments as Effective and Safe Anti-Aging Therapies for Sensitive Skin
by Anna Jaros-Sajda, Elzbieta Budzisz and Anna Erkiert-Polguj
Antioxidants 2024, 13(2), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox13020174 - 30 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1363
Abstract
The most common signs of aging skin include a decrease in firmness and density, uneven skin tone, and a tendency to erythema. There is an ever-increasing interest in aesthetic treatments that maintain the skin’s favorable appearance. However, such therapies are difficult in the [...] Read more.
The most common signs of aging skin include a decrease in firmness and density, uneven skin tone, and a tendency to erythema. There is an ever-increasing interest in aesthetic treatments that maintain the skin’s favorable appearance. However, such therapies are difficult in the case of sensitive skin, defined as a set of stimuli-triggered symptoms (stinging, erythema, burning, and itching) that would not appear in healthy skin. Sensitive skin is common and affects, to varying degrees, about half of the European population. This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of ascorbic acid—a known antioxidant—applied with sonophoresis and microneedling on the signs of photoaging in reactive and erythematous skin. A significant improvement in skin elasticity was observed after a series of tests. A significant reduction in erythema was observed after both therapies. The greatest reduction was observed on the cheeks after applying vitamin C combined with microneedling. At the same time, the results showed an excellent tolerance of both treatments, which proved them to be safe and effective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Antioxidants and Cosmetics—2nd Edition)
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31 pages, 4155 KiB  
Article
The Potential of Mangifera indica L. Peel Extract to Be Revalued in Cosmetic Applications
by Abigail García-Villegas, Álvaro Fernández-Ochoa, Alejandro Rojas-García, María Elena Alañón, David Arráez-Román, María de la Luz Cádiz-Gurrea and Antonio Segura-Carretero
Antioxidants 2023, 12(10), 1892; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox12101892 - 21 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2013
Abstract
The constant growth of the cosmetic industry, together with the scientific evidence of the beneficial properties of phytochemicals, has generated great interest in the incorporation of bioactive extracts in cosmetic formulations. This study aims to evaluate the bioactive potential of a mango peel [...] Read more.
The constant growth of the cosmetic industry, together with the scientific evidence of the beneficial properties of phytochemicals, has generated great interest in the incorporation of bioactive extracts in cosmetic formulations. This study aims to evaluate the bioactive potential of a mango peel extract for its incorporation into cosmetic formulations. For this purpose, several assays were conducted: phytochemical characterization; total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant potential; free-radical scavenging capacity; and skin aging-related enzyme inhibition. In addition, the extract was incorporated into a gel formulation, and a preliminary stability study was conducted where the accelerated (temperature ramp, centrifugation, and heating/cooling cycles) and long-term (storage in light and dark for three months) stability of the mango peel formulations were evaluated. The characterization results showed the annotation of 71 compounds, gallotannins being the most representative group. In addition, the mango peel extract was shown to be effective against the NO radical with an IC50 of 7.5 mg/L and against the hyaluronidase and xanthine oxidase enzymes with IC50 of 27 mg/L and 2 mg/L, respectively. The formulations incorporating the extract were stable during the stability study. The results demonstrate that mango peel extract can be a by-product to be revalorized as a promising cosmetic ingredient. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Antioxidants and Cosmetics—2nd Edition)
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Review

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29 pages, 1913 KiB  
Review
Advances in Research on the Activity Evaluation, Mechanism and Structure-Activity Relationships of Natural Antioxidant Peptides
by Baoting Xu, Qin Dong, Changxia Yu, Hongyu Chen, Yan Zhao, Baosheng Zhang, Panling Yu and Mingjie Chen
Antioxidants 2024, 13(4), 479; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox13040479 - 17 Apr 2024
Viewed by 283
Abstract
Antioxidant peptides are a class of biologically active peptides with low molecular weights and stable antioxidant properties that are isolated from proteins. In this review, the progress in research on the activity evaluation, action mechanism, and structure-activity relationships of natural antioxidant peptides are [...] Read more.
Antioxidant peptides are a class of biologically active peptides with low molecular weights and stable antioxidant properties that are isolated from proteins. In this review, the progress in research on the activity evaluation, action mechanism, and structure-activity relationships of natural antioxidant peptides are summarized. The methods used to evaluate antioxidant activity are mainly classified into three categories: in vitro chemical, in vitro cellular, and in vivo animal methods. Also, the biological effects produced by these three methods are listed: the scavenging of free radicals, chelation of metal ions, inhibition of lipid peroxidation, inhibition of oxidative enzyme activities, and activation of antioxidant enzymes and non-enzymatic systems. The antioxidant effects of natural peptides primarily consist of the regulation of redox signaling pathways, which includes activation of the Nrf2 pathway and the inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. The structure-activity relationships of the antioxidant peptides are investigated, including the effects of peptide molecular weight, amino acid composition and sequence, and secondary structure on antioxidant activity. In addition, four computer-assisted methods (molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, quantum chemical calculations, and the determination of quantitative structure-activity relationships) for analyzing the structure-activity effects of natural peptides are summarized. Thus, this review lays a theoretical foundation for the development of new antioxidants, nutraceuticals, and cosmetics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Antioxidants and Cosmetics—2nd Edition)
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