SIgA in Mucosal Immunity

A special issue of Antibodies (ISSN 2073-4468).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2015) | Viewed by 6746

Special Issue Editor

Division of Infectious Diseases, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, USA
Interests: plant and bacterial toxins; antibodies; vaccines; pathophysiology; biodefense
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Secretory IgA (SIgA) is frequently described as serving as the first line of defense against mucosal pathogens, especially in the gastrointestinal tract where IgA concentrations can exceed milligrams per milliliter in secretions. However, despite a widespread appreciation of the importance of SIgA in mucosal immunity, very little is actually known about the details of how secretory antibodies function in preventing pathogens from colonizing and invading the mucosal compartments. The concept of immune exclusion still holds, but it is increasingly apparent that SIgA does more than physically entrap bacteria (and viruses) in external environment. It is also increasing evident that SIgA plays a critical role in keeping the microbiota in check and thereby preventing the onset of potentially chronic inflammatory diseases. This Special Issue of Antibodies is dedicated to all things SIgA, and in illuminating the importance of secretory antibodies in mucosal protection. I invite you to contribute to this issue and stimulate the discourse and to aide in advancing our understanding of SIgA.

Dr. Nicholas J. Mantis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibodies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • Enteric
  • secretory component
  • epithelium
  • antibody transport
  • antibody effector function
  • mucus, breast milk

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review
What Makes A Bacterial Oral Vaccine a Strong Inducer of High-Affinity IgA Responses?
Antibodies 2015, 4(4), 295-313; https://doi.org/10.3390/antib4040295 - 15 Oct 2015
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 6383
Abstract
Oral vaccination against bacterial pathogens that infect via the gastrointestinal tract is highly desirable for both economic reasons and the supposed benefits of local mucosal immunity. However, the majority of oral vaccine trials in humans result in failure. Here we try to assimilate [...] Read more.
Oral vaccination against bacterial pathogens that infect via the gastrointestinal tract is highly desirable for both economic reasons and the supposed benefits of local mucosal immunity. However, the majority of oral vaccine trials in humans result in failure. Here we try to assimilate our current knowledge to generate a model to improve vaccine development strategies. A model previously postulated describes the “immunogenicity” of intestinal bacterial species as a sum of the ability of the species to compete with the microbiota, the “pathogenicity index,” and the uniqueness of the species. While this model quite neatly explains the difficulties in generating appropriately attenuated live vaccine strains, it cannot explain the success of fully apathogenic or inactivated high-dose vaccines. We therefore propose a step away from focusing on bacterial traits, and towards the most basic requirements of mucosal vaccines: i.e., the delivery of antigen to the gut-associated lymphoid tissues and the ability of that antigen to induce germinal center formation. While the models seem trivial, both suggest that vaccination strategies permitting uncoupling of disease-causing phenomena from immune stimulation will have a much broader safety margin in a diverse human population. Our modified model further suggests the benefits of delivering antigen in the form of high-dose fully apathogenic or sterile particles, combined with relevant adjuvants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue SIgA in Mucosal Immunity)
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