Feature Papers in Antibiotic Use in the Communities

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Antibiotics Use and Antimicrobial Stewardship".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 11107

Special Issue Editor

Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway
Interests: antibiotic use in community; cultural differences; behavioural change; personality; attitudes; risk
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared that antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the ten most important global public health threats facing humanity. The main drivers in the development of AMR are the misuse and overuse of antimicrobials in the community. Inappropriate prescription practices among local physicians, the availability of over-the-counter antibiotics in pharmacies, and self-medication with antibiotics among community members are some of the main causes of inappropriate antibiotic use and the increase in AMR.

The Special Issue, “Feature Papers in Antibiotic Use in the Communities”, focuses on the ambulatory use of antibiotics, i.e., how antibiotics are prescribed, distributed, and used in the community. Papers addressing a wide range of topics related to antibiotic use in the community among humans are welcome. These can include, for example, topics such as antibiotic stewardship, including prescription practices and control, beliefs, knowledge, and behaviors among healthcare personnel and community members, as well as sociocultural and economic factors related to antibiotic use. Cross-country comparative studies are especially welcome. The studies can be based on any form of research design, from quantitative to qualitative studies and macrolevel indicators. Studies based on only pharmacological or hospital-based data, or not involving human antibiotic use, are not within the scope of this Special Issue.

We kindly invite original research articles as well as review papers.

Prof. Dr. Timo Juhani Lajunen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • community
  • ambulatory antibiotic use
  • antibiotic stewardship
  • behavior
  • knowledge
  • beliefs

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 298 KiB  
Article
Rational Drug and Antibiotic Use Status, E-Health Literacy in Syrian Immigrants and Related Factors: A Cross-Sectional Study
Antibiotics 2023, 12(10), 1531; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12101531 - 11 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1144
Abstract
Rational drug use is a pivotal concept linked with morbidity and mortality. Immigration plays a significant role as a determinant affecting individuals’ health-related attitudes, behaviors, and the pursuit of health services. Within this context, the study was initiated to assess the factors influencing [...] Read more.
Rational drug use is a pivotal concept linked with morbidity and mortality. Immigration plays a significant role as a determinant affecting individuals’ health-related attitudes, behaviors, and the pursuit of health services. Within this context, the study was initiated to assess the factors influencing health literacy and rational drug use among Syrian immigrants in Istanbul. A cross-sectional study was undertaken on 542 Syrian adults utilizing a three-part questionnaire encompassing sociodemographics, rational drug use, and the e-health literacy scale (eHEALS). With an average age of 39.19 ± 13.10 years, a majority of participants believed medications should solely be doctor-prescribed (97%) and opposed keeping antibiotics at home (93.7%). Yet, 62.5% thought excessive herbal medicine use was harmless. The mean eHEALS score stood at 20.57 ± 7.26, and factors like age, marital status, income, and duration of stay in Turkey influenced e-health literacy. Associations were seen between low e-health literacy and being female, being older, having a lower education level, and regular medication use. Syrian immigrants displayed proper knowledge concerning antibiotics yet exhibited gaps in their understanding of general drug usage, treatment adherence, and herbal medicines. Approximately 80.3% had limited health literacy, pointing to the need for targeted interventions for enhanced health and societal assimilation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Antibiotic Use in the Communities)
14 pages, 1424 KiB  
Article
Insights from a Cross-Sectional Study on Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors Concerning Antibiotic Use in a Large Metropolitan Area: Implications for Public Health and Policy Interventions
Antibiotics 2023, 12(10), 1476; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12101476 - 22 Sep 2023
Viewed by 962
Abstract
The overuse and inappropriate use of antibiotics pose a grave threat to public health, contributing significantly to the accelerated development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and increased rates of morbidity and mortality, making it a leading cause of death globally. To examine the relationship [...] Read more.
The overuse and inappropriate use of antibiotics pose a grave threat to public health, contributing significantly to the accelerated development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and increased rates of morbidity and mortality, making it a leading cause of death globally. To examine the relationship between demographic variables and knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors concerning antibiotic use, a survey-based cross-sectional study was conducted involving 1158 individuals. The questionnaire included two sections: in the first section, participants’ socio-demographic characteristics were analyzed; the second investigated knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors concerning antibiotics utilization using a total of 36 questions. Descriptive statistics were used, and then a multiple linear regression analysis (MLRA) using three models was carried out. In Model I, knowledge about antibiotics exhibited correlations with smoking habits and educational attainment. In Model II, attitudes were significantly associated with gender, smoking habits, age, education, relationship status, and knowledge. In Model III, behaviors related to antibiotics were correlated with educational attainment, having children, knowledge, and attitudes. Implementing tailored public health programs could be a cost-effective intervention to enhance behaviors associated with antibiotic use in the general population. This study offers valuable insights into the determinants of knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding antibiotics in the general population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Antibiotic Use in the Communities)
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12 pages, 2381 KiB  
Article
Antibiotic Knowledge, Antibiotic Resistance Knowledge, and Antibiotic Use: A Cross-Sectional Study among Community Members of Bangkok in Thailand
Antibiotics 2023, 12(8), 1312; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12081312 - 12 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1564
Abstract
This study aimed to explore antibiotic knowledge, antibiotic resistance knowledge, and antibiotic use among adults in Bangkok, Thailand. This is a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data generated from a sample of 161 individuals living in Bangkok. Participants completed an online self-administered questionnaire developed [...] Read more.
This study aimed to explore antibiotic knowledge, antibiotic resistance knowledge, and antibiotic use among adults in Bangkok, Thailand. This is a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data generated from a sample of 161 individuals living in Bangkok. Participants completed an online self-administered questionnaire developed by the World Health Organization. Descriptive analysis, the chi-square test, and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. The sample comprised more females (56.5%) than males (42.2%). The majority of responders (67.7%) were between the ages of 18 and 40. More than half of the respondents mistakenly believed that antibiotics could treat colds and flu (54.7% and 47.2%, respectively). About 54.7% were aware that antibiotic resistance could harm them and their families. The chi-square test results showed that the levels of education were associated with antibiotic knowledge (p = 0.012), antibiotic resistance knowledge (p < 0.001), and antibiotic use (p = 0.023). Multiple logistic regressions showed that respondents with at least a bachelor’s degree or higher had better knowledge of antibiotics. Respondents who worked in the profession had better knowledge of antibiotic resistance. Respondents with sufficient incomes were more likely to use antibiotics. Baseline data from the study will be useful in antibiotic stewardship and public health campaigns among Bangkok residents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Antibiotic Use in the Communities)
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14 pages, 274 KiB  
Article
Antibiotics Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours among the Population Living in Greece and Turkey
Antibiotics 2023, 12(8), 1279; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12081279 - 03 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 981
Abstract
Antimicrobial resistance is one of the largest threats to public health worldwide. As the inappropriate use of antibiotics is one of the leading causes of antibiotic resistance, it is important to have an understanding of the public’s knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards antibiotics [...] Read more.
Antimicrobial resistance is one of the largest threats to public health worldwide. As the inappropriate use of antibiotics is one of the leading causes of antibiotic resistance, it is important to have an understanding of the public’s knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards antibiotics and antimicrobial resistance. The present study investigated the knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards antibiotics among the public living in Greece and Turkey using an online cross-sectional survey, with social media advertising (e.g., Facebook) and snowball sampling. In total, 709 individuals completed the survey (Greece n = 309, Turkey n = 400), with an average age of 34.2 (SD = 13.1) and 40.5 (SD = 14.7), respectively. In Greece, 49.4% of the participants were female, and in Turkey, this figure was 62.4%. The Greek respondents reported that obtaining antibiotics without a prescription was easier (52.6% reported “easy or very easy”) than the Turkish (35.6% reported “easy or very easy”) respondents did. This study reveals that Greek citizens were more educated and knowledgeable about antibiotics (58.5% of Greeks and 44.2% of Turks identified antibiotics correctly), their effects (20.9% of Greeks and 26.3% of Turks agreed with wrong statements about antibiotics) and the risks of antibiotic resistance, compared to those from Turkey. On the other hand, the Greek respondents were more prone to use leftover antibiotics or to give them to someone else later (p < 0.001). The findings of this study indicate that Greece and Turkey, both countries with high rates of antibiotic usage, exhibit distinct variations in their knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions concerning antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance. Effective countermeasures such as public campaigns should be targeted according to the population and those areas of knowledge, attitudes and behaviours in which the main shortcomings lie. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Antibiotic Use in the Communities)
13 pages, 273 KiB  
Article
Antibiotics Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours among the Population Living in Cyprus
Antibiotics 2023, 12(5), 897; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12050897 - 12 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1524
Abstract
This study investigated the knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards antibiotics among the general public living in the Republic of Cyprus (RoC) and the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) by using an online questionnaire. Differences were examined using independent samples t-tests, chi-square [...] Read more.
This study investigated the knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards antibiotics among the general public living in the Republic of Cyprus (RoC) and the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) by using an online questionnaire. Differences were examined using independent samples t-tests, chi-square tests, Mann–Whitney U tests and Spearman’s rho. In total, 519 individuals completed the survey (RoC = 267, TRNC = 252), with an average age of 32.7, and 52.2% were female. Most citizens correctly identified paracetamol (TRNC = 93.7%, RoC = 53.9%) and ibuprofen (TRNC = 70.2%, RoC = 47.6%) as non-antibiotic medications. A substantial proportion thought antibiotics could treat viral infections, such as a cold (TRNC = 16.3%, RoC = 40.8%) or the flu (TRNC = 21.4%, RoC = 50.4%). Most participants understood that bacteria can become resistant to antibiotics (TRNC = 71.4%, RoC = 64.4%), that unnecessary use can lead to drug ineffectiveness (TRNC = 86.1%, RoC = 72.3%) and that they should always complete the course of antibiotics (TRNC = 85.7%, RoC = 64.0%). Positive attitudes towards antibiotics correlated negatively with knowledge in both samples, indicating that the more people know, the less positive their attitudes towards their use. The RoC appears to have tighter controls of over-the-counter (OTC) sales of antibiotics than TRNC. This study reveals that different communities can have varying levels of knowledge, attitudes and perceptions about antibiotic use. Tighter enforcement of the OTC regulations, educational efforts and media campaigns are needed for enhancing prudent antibiotic use on the island. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Antibiotic Use in the Communities)
10 pages, 237 KiB  
Article
General Perceptions and Knowledge of Antibiotic Resistance and Antibiotic Use Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Survey of US Adults
Antibiotics 2023, 12(4), 672; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12040672 - 29 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1898
Abstract
This study aimed to assess understanding of antibiotic resistance and evaluate antibiotic use themes among the general public. In March 2018, respondents that were ≥21 years old and residing in the United States were recruited from ResearchMatch.org and surveyed to collect data on [...] Read more.
This study aimed to assess understanding of antibiotic resistance and evaluate antibiotic use themes among the general public. In March 2018, respondents that were ≥21 years old and residing in the United States were recruited from ResearchMatch.org and surveyed to collect data on respondent expectations, knowledge, and opinions regarding prescribing antibiotics and antibiotic resistance. Content analysis was used to code open-ended definitions of antibiotic resistance into central themes. Chi-square tests were used to assess differences between the definitions of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic use. Among the 657 respondents, nearly all (99%) had taken an antibiotic previously. When asked to define antibiotic resistance, the definitions provided were inductively coded into six central themes: 35% bacteria adaptation, 22% misuse/overuse, 22% resistant bacteria, 10% antibiotic ineffectiveness, 7% body immunity, and 3% provided an incorrect definition with no consistent theme. Themes that were identified in respondent definitions of resistance significantly differed between those who reported having shared an antibiotic versus those who had not (p = 0.03). Public health campaigns remain a central component in the fight to combat antibiotic resistance. Future campaigns should address the public’s understanding of antibiotic resistance and modifiable behaviors that may contribute to resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Antibiotic Use in the Communities)
10 pages, 2642 KiB  
Article
Assessment of the Prescriptions of Systemic Antibiotics in Primary Dental Care in Germany from 2017 to 2021: A Longitudinal Drug Utilization Study
Antibiotics 2022, 11(12), 1723; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11121723 - 30 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1220
Abstract
(1) Background: Due to increasing antibiotic resistance, the frequency of antibiotic use should be questioned in dentistry and attention paid to the choice of the best suited substance according to guidelines. In Germany, overprescribing of clindamycin was noteworthy in the past. Therefore, the [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Due to increasing antibiotic resistance, the frequency of antibiotic use should be questioned in dentistry and attention paid to the choice of the best suited substance according to guidelines. In Germany, overprescribing of clindamycin was noteworthy in the past. Therefore, the aim of our study was to determine the trend of antibiotic prescriptions in primary dental care. (2) Methods: Prescriptions of antibiotics in German primary dental care from 2017 to 2021 were analysed using dispensing data from community pharmacies, claimed to the statutory health insurance (SHI) funds, and compared with all antibiotic prescriptions in primary care. Prescriptions were analysed based on defined daily doses per 1000 SHI-insured persons per day (DID). (3) Results: Amoxicillin was the most frequently prescribed antibiotic (0.505 DID in 2017, 0.627 in 2021, +24.2%) in primary dental care, followed by clindamycin (0.374 DID in 2017, 0.294 in 2021, −21.4%). Dental prescriptions still made up 56% of all clindamycin prescriptions in primary care in 2021. (4) Conclusions: Our study suggests that the problem of overuse of clindamycin in German dentistry has improved, but still persists. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Antibiotic Use in the Communities)
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16 pages, 294 KiB  
Article
Perspectives of Immigrants and Native Dutch on Antibiotic Use: A Qualitative Study
Antibiotics 2022, 11(9), 1179; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11091179 - 31 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1274
Abstract
Immigrants constitute large proportions of the population in many high-income countries. Knowledge about their perceptions of antibiotics, in comparison to native populations, is limited. We explored these perceptions by organizing nine homogeneous focus group discussions (FGDs) with first-generation immigrant and native Dutch participants [...] Read more.
Immigrants constitute large proportions of the population in many high-income countries. Knowledge about their perceptions of antibiotics, in comparison to native populations, is limited. We explored these perceptions by organizing nine homogeneous focus group discussions (FGDs) with first-generation immigrant and native Dutch participants (N = 64) from Rotterdam and Utrecht, who were recruited with the assistance of immigrant (community support) organizations. The FGDs were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Inductive thematic analyses were performed with the qualitative analysis software Atlas.ti, using open and axial coding. We did not find noteworthy differences between immigrants and native Dutch participants; all participants had an overall reluctant attitude towards antibiotics. Within-group differences were larger than between-group differences. In each FGD there were, for instance, participants who adopted an assertive stance in order to receive antibiotics, who had low antibiotic-related knowledge, or who used antibiotics incorrectly. Native Dutch participants expressed similar difficulties as immigrant participants in the communication with their GP, which mainly related to time constraints. Immigrants who encountered language barriers experienced even greater communicational difficulties and reported that they often feel embarrassed and refrain from asking questions. To stimulate more prudent use of antibiotics, more attention is needed for supportive multilingual patient materials. In addition, GPs need to adjust their information, guidance, and communication for the individual’s needs, regardless of the patient’s migration background. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Antibiotic Use in the Communities)
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