Sepsis Management and Antibiotic Therapy

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Antibiotic Therapy in Infectious Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 515

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Internal Medicine II, Faculty of Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Gr. T. Popa, 700115 Iași, Romania
2. “St. Parascheva” Clinical Hospital of Infectious Diseases, 700116 Iași, Romania
Interests: infectious diseases; multidrug-resistant (MDR); clostridium difficile; bacterial meningitis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sepsis is a severe medical condition that requires urgent attention and prompt treatment. It occurs when the body's immune system overreacts to an infection, leading to inflammation and damage to tissues and organs. Sepsis can quickly progress into septic shock, which can be life-threatening. Antibiotic therapy is a critical component of sepsis management, helping to kill bacteria causing infection and prevent its spread throughout the body. However, the overuse and misuse of antibiotics have led to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which pose a significant challenge to sepsis management.

This Special Issue aims to provide an overview of the current best practices in Sepsis Management and Antibiotic Therapy, publishing the latest research, guidelines, and clinical recommendations. Submissions to this issue should include topics such as the use of biomarkers for sepsis management, the role of antimicrobial stewardship in preventing antibiotic resistance, and emerging therapies for sepsis treatment.

Prof. Dr. Egidia Gabriela Miftode
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sepsis
  • antibiotic therapy
  • infection
  • antimicrobial
  • antifungal

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

14 pages, 740 KiB  
Article
Emergence of High-Level Gentamicin Resistance in Streptococcus agalactiae Hypervirulent Serotype IV ST1010 (CC452) Strains by Acquisition of a Novel Integrative and Conjugative Element
by Roberta Creti, Monica Imperi, Uzma Basit Khan, Alberto Berardi, Simona Recchia, Giovanna Alfarone and Giovanni Gherardi
Antibiotics 2024, 13(6), 491; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics13060491 - 26 May 2024
Viewed by 211
Abstract
Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococci, GBS) is responsible for severe infections in both neonates and adults. Currently, empiric antimicrobial therapy for sepsis and meningitis is the combined use of penicillin and gentamicin due to the enhanced bactericidal activity. However, high-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) [...] Read more.
Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococci, GBS) is responsible for severe infections in both neonates and adults. Currently, empiric antimicrobial therapy for sepsis and meningitis is the combined use of penicillin and gentamicin due to the enhanced bactericidal activity. However, high-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) abrogates the synergism. The rate of HLGR was investigated within a dataset of 433 GBS strains collected from cases of invasive disease in both adults and neonates as well as from pregnant carriers. GBS isolates (n = 20, 4.6%) presented with HLGR (gentamicin MIC breakpoint >1024 mg/L) that was differently diffused between strains from adults or neonates (5.2% vs. 2.8%). Notably, 70% of HLGR GBS strains (14 isolates) were serotype IV. Serotype IV HLGR-GBS isolates were susceptible to all antibiotics tested, exhibited the alpha-C/HvgA/PI-2b virulence string, and belonged to sequence type 1010 (clonal complex (CC) 452). The mobile element that harbored the HLGR aac(6′)-aph(2)″ gene is a novel integrative and conjugative element (ICE) about 45 kb long, derived from GBS 515 ICE tRNALys. The clonal expansion of this HLGR hypervirulent serotype IV GBS CC452 sublineage may pose a threat to the management of infections caused by this strain type. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sepsis Management and Antibiotic Therapy)
Back to TopTop