Antimicrobial Plant Extracts and Phytochemicals, 3rd Volume

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant-Derived Antibiotics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 3389

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milan, Italy
Interests: essential oils; bioactive phytochemicals; ethnopharmacology; antimicrobial resistance; one health; food security
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We have published two successful volumes of the Special Issue “Antimicrobial Plant Extracts and Phytochemicals”, which encouraged us to open a third volume on the same topic.

The urgent need for novel antimicrobial drugs to reduce the global burden of infectious diseases has greatly stimulated the exploration of plant products as a source of novel and effective phytotherapeutic agents. Indeed, plant products represent a nearly unlimited source of (multitarget) active ingredients, consisting of complex mixtures of hundreds of different compounds that may be additively or synergistically active once administered. In addition, plant extracts, essential oils, and phytochemicals can be useful in adjuvant therapy for improving the efficacy of conventional antimicrobials, decreasing their adverse effects, and reversing multidrug resistance, with the latter being a global threat due to the genetic plasticity and environmental adaptability of pathogenic microorganisms. Not least, selected phytochemicals can also be used as templates for the development of new scaffolds for antimicrobial drugs.

You are welcome to read the papers published in the two previous Special Issues:

Antimicrobial Plant Extracts and Phytochemicals

Antimicrobial Plant Extracts and Phytochemicals, 2nd Volume

Dr. Marcello Iriti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

52 pages, 3008 KiB  
Review
Ethnopharmacology, Antimicrobial Potency, and Phytochemistry of African Combretum and Pteleopsis Species (Combretaceae): A Review
by Heidi Silén, Enass Y. A. Salih, Eunice Ego Mgbeahuruike and Pia Fyhrqvist
Antibiotics 2023, 12(2), 264; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12020264 - 28 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2938
Abstract
Bacterial and fungal resistance to antibiotics is of growing global concern. Plants such as the African Combretum and Pteleopsis species, which are used in traditional medicine for the treatment of infections, could be good sources for antimicrobial extracts, drug scaffolds, and/or antibiotic adjuvants. [...] Read more.
Bacterial and fungal resistance to antibiotics is of growing global concern. Plants such as the African Combretum and Pteleopsis species, which are used in traditional medicine for the treatment of infections, could be good sources for antimicrobial extracts, drug scaffolds, and/or antibiotic adjuvants. In African countries, plant species are often used in combinations as traditional remedies. It is suggested that the plant species enhance the effects of each other in these combination treatments. Thus, the multi-species-containing herbal medications could have a good antimicrobial potency. In addition, plant extracts and compounds are known to potentiate the effects of antibiotics. The objective of this review is to compile the information on the botany, ethnopharmacology, ethnobotany, and appearance in herbal markets of African species of the genera Combretum and Pteleopsis. With this ethnobotanical information as a background, this review summarizes the information on the phytochemistry and antimicrobial potency of the extracts and their active compounds, as well as their combination effects with conventional antibiotics. The databases used for the literature search were Scopus, Elsevier, EBSCOhost, PubMed, Google Scholar, and SciFinder. In summary, a number of Combretum and Pteleopsis species were reported to display significant in vitro antibacterial and antifungal efficacy. Tannins, terpenes, flavonoids, stilbenes, and alkaloids—some of them with good antimicrobial potential—are known from species of the genera Combretum and Pteleopsis. Among the most potent antimicrobial compounds are arjunglucoside I (MIC 1.9 µg/mL) and imberbic acid (MIC 1.56 µg/mL), found in both genera and in some Combretum species, respectively. The in vitro antimicrobial properties of the extracts and compounds of many Combretum and Pteleopsis species support their traditional medicinal uses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Plant Extracts and Phytochemicals, 3rd Volume)
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