Natural Antimicrobials from Bee Products: Biological Activities and Future Perspectives

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "The Global Need for Effective Antibiotics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 February 2022) | Viewed by 15916

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, 400372 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: animal infectious diseases; antimicrobial resistance; veterinary immunology; environmental microbiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Preclinical Sciences, Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences-SGGW, 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: clinical veterinary microbiology; molecular biology; antimicrobial resistance; animal pathogens; infectious diseases; zoonoses; actinomycetales
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: regenerative medicine; molecular medicine; veterinary medicine; cell transplantation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The widespread emergence of antibiotic resistance currently requires the investigation of effective therapeutic solutions, especially in communicable diseases. Antibacterial drugs used in hospitals lead to numerous problems, failing to effectively fight infection, restore the health of either patient, human or animal, and increasing the costs of the therapy. In veterinary medicine, the persistence of antibiotic residues in foods of animal origin further complicates the dilemma. Bee products are, in this framework, an available and often effective antimicrobial alternative, with beneficial biological effects on the consumer. Numerous bacteria show sensitivity to honey, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, an extremely aggressive bacterium found in human and veterinary medicine. Both manuka honey and propolis seem to be a viable therapeutic alternative against various pathogens, through their antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties. Currently, interest in propolis and honey is growing, with these natural compounds offering a therapeutic perspective closer to "biological availability" than synthetic drugs. The growing interest in the antibacterial properties of different bee products and the acceptance of their therapeutic potential has brought traditional medicine closer to alternative medicine. Therefore, proving the effectiveness of bee products on a scientific basis against pathogenic bacteria of medical importance can be a significant advance in antibiotic resistance prevention and control.

Prof. Marina Spinu
Dr. Magdalena Rzewuska
Prof. Dr. Emoke Pall
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Antibiotic resistance
  • Honey
  • Honeydew honey
  • Propolis
  • Royal Jelly
  • Bees

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

26 pages, 5211 KiB  
Article
Diversity of Monofloral Honey Based on the Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Potential
by Anca Hulea, Diana Obiștioiu, Ileana Cocan, Ersilia Alexa, Monica Negrea, Alina-Georgeta Neacșu, Călin Hulea, Corina Pascu, Luminita Costinar, Ionica Iancu, Emil Tîrziu and Viorel Herman
Antibiotics 2022, 11(5), 595; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11050595 - 28 Apr 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2203
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the antioxidant profile and the antimicrobial activity of four different types of monofloral honey (manuka (MH), brassica rapeseed (BH), acacia (AH), and linden honey (LH)) against some bacterial/fungal ATCC strains and some multidrug-resistant strains isolated from chronic otitis [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the antioxidant profile and the antimicrobial activity of four different types of monofloral honey (manuka (MH), brassica rapeseed (BH), acacia (AH), and linden honey (LH)) against some bacterial/fungal ATCC strains and some multidrug-resistant strains isolated from chronic otitis in dogs. For the characterisation of the antioxidant profile of each honey, we extracted the honey samples by hydroalcoholic extraction and analysed them in terms of total polyphenols (TPC), total flavonoids (TFC), and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) using the spectrophotometric method. The antimicrobial activity was determined using the microdilution method at concentrations of 10%, 15%, and 20%, with the results expressed in OD (optical density) calculated as BIR% (bacterial inhibition rate)/MIR% (mycelial inhibition rate). The antioxidant characterisation of the analysed honey samples showed the highest antioxidant activity and concentrations of TPC and TFC in MH, followed by LH. MH was proven to be the most effective on most clinical isolates concerning the antimicrobial activity in comparison with BH, AH, and LH. Except for B. cepacia and P. vulgaris, all the clinical isolates were sensitive to the antibacterial activity of honey. Regarding the ATCC strains, MH 10% was the most effective in inhibiting all the strains tested except for P. aeruginosa. In conclusion, the efficacy classification in our study was MH > BH > AH > LH. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

37 pages, 9438 KiB  
Review
Pharmaceutical Prospects of Bee Products: Special Focus on Anticancer, Antibacterial, Antiviral, and Antiparasitic Properties
by Firzan Nainu, Ayu Masyita, Muh. Akbar Bahar, Muhammad Raihan, Shajuthi Rahman Prova, Saikat Mitra, Talha Bin Emran and Jesus Simal-Gandara
Antibiotics 2021, 10(7), 822; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10070822 - 06 Jul 2021
Cited by 63 | Viewed by 13012
Abstract
Bee products have long been used in traditional healing practices to treat many types of disorders, including cancer and microbial-related diseases. Indeed, several chemical compounds found in bee products have been demonstrated to display anticancer, antibacterial, antiviral, and antiparasitic properties. With the improvement [...] Read more.
Bee products have long been used in traditional healing practices to treat many types of disorders, including cancer and microbial-related diseases. Indeed, several chemical compounds found in bee products have been demonstrated to display anticancer, antibacterial, antiviral, and antiparasitic properties. With the improvement of research tools and in view of recent advances related to bee products, this review aims to provide broad yet detailed insight into the pharmaceutical prospects of bee products such as honey, propolis, bee pollen, royal jelly, bee bread, beeswax, and bee venom, in the domain of cancer and infectious disease management. Available literature confirms the efficacy of these bee products in the alleviation of cancer progression, inhibition of bacterial and viral proliferation, and mitigation of parasitic-related symptoms. With such potentials, bioactive components isolated from the bee products can be used as an alternative approach in the long-run effort to improve humans’ health at a personal and community level. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop