Antibiotic Resistance: One Health Issue

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2024) | Viewed by 3001

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Advanced Analysis in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (LAABBM), Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), University City, Rio de Janeiro 21941-909, RJ, Brazil
Interests: applied microbiology; drug resistance; bioinformatics; genomic

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Guest Editor
Núcleo de Análise de Alimentos (NAL), LADETEC, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Horácio Macedo, 1281, Rio de Janeiro 21941-598, RJ, Brazil
Interests: food microbiology; drug resistance; antimicrobial resistance genes; genomic; microbiome

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Guest Editor
1. Graduate Program in Veterinary Hygiene (PPGHV), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Fluminense Federal University (UFF), Vital Brazil Filho, Niterói 24230-340, RJ, Brazil
2. Center for Food Analysis (NAL), Technological Development Support Laboratory (LADETEC), Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Cidade Universitária, Rio de Janeiro 21941-901, RJ, Brazil
3. Laboratory of Advanced Analysis in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (LAABBM), Department of Biochemistry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Cidade Universitária, Rio de Janeiro 21941-909, RJ, Brazil
Interests: food control; antimicrobial resistance genes; genomic; microbiome; animal production
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antimicrobial resistance has become increasingly evident and treated by leading global health organizations as one of the most relevant global health challenges of the 21st century. Some of the causes of failure in treating human infections include the indiscriminate and inappropriate use of these compounds, both in the human clinic and in animal production. Administration of subinhibitory concentrations can increase mutation rates, leading to intestinal bacterial population

diversification and the selection of multiple drug resistance genes. Even more worrying is knowing that, currently, the consumption of antimicrobials by animals is twice as high as in humans, and most of these compounds are destined for animal production. Thus, it is clear that the widespread use of these substances in animal production can be a determining factor for the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes throughout the animal production chain. In this context, we would like to invite researchers to publish their studies on this subject area, not only pointing out the problem of micro-organism resistance to antibiotics, but also bringing innovative solutions that can help us to slow down the growth of this problem that surrounds us. We welcome studies with phenotypic and genotypic characterization of resistance factors as screening forms to know where the resistance is emerging. As well, are welcome studies of phytotherapeutic or alternative drugs that can be used instead of antibiotics and/or growth promoters.

Dr. Pedro Panzenhagen
Prof. Dr. Rafaela Gomes Ferrari
Prof. Dr. Carlos Adam Conte Júnior
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • resistance genes
  • resistome
  • animal-based foods
  • phytotherapeutic drugs
  • growth promoters

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 2563 KiB  
Article
New Evidence for the Role of Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide as an Antimicrobial Peptide in Teleost Fish
by Janet Velázquez, Tania Rodríguez-Cornejo, Tania Rodríguez-Ramos, Geysi Pérez-Rodríguez, Laura Rivera, James Hugh Campbell, Lowia Al-Hussinee, Yamila Carpio, Mario Pablo Estrada and Brian Dixon
Antibiotics 2023, 12(10), 1484; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12101484 - 27 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1007
Abstract
Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) is a multifunctional neuropeptide that is widely distributed and conserved across species. We have previously shown that in teleost fish, PACAP not only possesses direct antimicrobial properties but also immunomodulatory effects against the bacterial pathogens Flavobacterium psychrophilum and [...] Read more.
Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) is a multifunctional neuropeptide that is widely distributed and conserved across species. We have previously shown that in teleost fish, PACAP not only possesses direct antimicrobial properties but also immunomodulatory effects against the bacterial pathogens Flavobacterium psychrophilum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using in vitro and in vivo experiments. These previous results suggest PACAP can be used as an alternative to antibiotics to prevent and/or treat bacterial infections in the aquaculture industry. To accomplish this goal, more studies are needed to better understand the effect of PACAP on pathogens affecting fish in live infections. In the present study, the transcripts PACAP, PRP/PACAP, and VPAC2 receptor were examined in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) naturally infected with Yersinia ruckeri, which exhibited an increase in their expression in the spleen when compared to healthy fish. Synthetic Clarias gariepinus PACAP-38 has direct antimicrobial activity on Y. ruckeri and inhibits up to 60% of the bacterial growth when the peptide is at concentrations between 50 and 100 µM in TSB. The growth inhibition increased up to 90% in the presence of 12.5 µM of PACAP-38 when salt-free LB broth was used instead of TSB. It was also found to inhibit Y. ruckeri growth in a dose-dependent manner when the rainbow trout monocyte/macrophage-like cell line (RTS11) was pre-treated with lower concentrations of the peptide (0.02 and 0.1 µM) before going through infection. Differential gene expression was analyzed in this in vitro model. Overall, the results revealed new evidence to support the role of PACAP as an antimicrobial and immunomodulatory peptide treatment in teleosts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibiotic Resistance: One Health Issue)
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13 pages, 1570 KiB  
Article
Genomic Characterization of Salmonella Isangi: A Global Perspective of a Rare Serovar
by Anamaria Mota Pereira dos Santos, Pedro Panzenhagen, Rafaela G. Ferrari, Ana Carolina S. de Jesus, Ana Beatriz Portes, Alan Clavelland Ochioni, Dalia dos Prazeres Rodrigues and Carlos Adam Conte-Junior
Antibiotics 2023, 12(8), 1309; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12081309 - 11 Aug 2023
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Abstract
Salmonella Isangi is an infrequent serovar that has recently been reported in several countries due to nosocomial infections. A considerable number of reports indicate Salmonella Isangi multidrug resistance, especially to cephalosporins, which could potentially pose a risk to public health worldwide. Genomic analysis [...] Read more.
Salmonella Isangi is an infrequent serovar that has recently been reported in several countries due to nosocomial infections. A considerable number of reports indicate Salmonella Isangi multidrug resistance, especially to cephalosporins, which could potentially pose a risk to public health worldwide. Genomic analysis is an excellent tool for monitoring the emergence of microorganisms and related factors. In this context, the aim of this study was to carry out a genomic analysis of Salmonella Isangi isolated from poultry in Brazil, and to compare it with the available genomes from the Pathogen Detection database and Sequence Read Archive. A total of 142 genomes isolated from 11 different countries were investigated. A broad distribution of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) genes was identified in the Salmonella Isangi genomes examined (blaCTX-M-15, blaCTX-M-2, blaDHA-1, blaNDM-1, blaOXA-10, blaOXA-1, blaOXA-48, blaSCO-1, blaSHV-5, blaTEM-131, blaTEM-1B), primarily in South Africa. Resistome analysis revealed predicted resistance to aminoglycoside, sulfonamide, macrolide, tetracycline, trimethoprim, phenicol, chloramphenicol, and quaternary ammonium. Additionally, PMQR (plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance) genes qnr19, qnrB1, and qnrS1 were identified, along with point mutations in the genes gyrAD87N, gyrAS83F, and gyrBS464F, which confer resistance to ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid. With regard to plasmids, we identified 17 different incompatibility groups, including IncC, Col(pHAD28), IncHI2, IncHI2A, IncM2, ColpVC, Col(Ye4449), Col156, IncR, IncI1(Alpha), IncFIB (pTU3), Col(B5512), IncQ1, IncL, IncN, IncFIB(pHCM2), and IncFIB (pN55391). Phylogenetic analysis revealed five clusters grouped by sequence type and antimicrobial gene distribution. The study highlights the need for monitoring rare serovars that may become emergent due to multidrug resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibiotic Resistance: One Health Issue)
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