Clinical Advances in Equine Veterinary and Management

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Equids".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 January 2023) | Viewed by 6884

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
Interests: veterinary pharmacology and therapeutics; animal welfare; veterinary legislation; diseases in dogs
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, Polo Universitario Annunziata, University of Messina, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: horse internal medicine; diagnostic technologies; ethical and professional duties
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Hospital Clínico Veterinario de Córdoba, Universidad de Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain
Interests: regenerative therapy; rehabilitation; equine sports medicine; orthopaedic surgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Messina, Polo Universitario Annunziata, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: equine medicine; diagnosis of infection diseases; treatments; equine legislation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Equines play different roles within human society, providing companionship, transport, and competing in sports. Their well-being is strongly related to their selected role and how they are perceived within their relationship with humans. Good quality of life for horses relies upon evaluation of the state of suffering, and the interpretation of signs related to the specific context. In accordance with ethical principles and specific laws, veterinarians should consider themselves responsible for developing further knowledge of equine medicine, applying better approaches for diagnosis and treatment, and rejecting ineffective treatments.

Prediction of injury in horses remains a challenge and approaches rely on a limited number of compounds, which indicate when overtraining and potential damage has occurred. All studies thus far have focused on diagnostic procedures, prognostic aspects and appropriated therapeutic protocols of diseases, employing specific indicators or pertinent biomarkers. Providing diagnostic technologies knowledge could provide renewed insights about health, disease, drug toxicity, or therapy efficacy in horses diseases.

This Special Issue aims to present selected contributions regarding the progression of knowledge in equine medicine, including welfare, ethics, law and management. Original research articles, case studies, and reviews will be considered. Potential topics could involve—but are not limited to—equine medicine, infectious diseases, therapeutics, equine welfare, ethics, and law.

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Prof. Dr. Annamaria Passantino
Prof. Dr. Michela Pugliese
Dr. David Argüelles
Dr. Vito Biondi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • equine
  • medicine
  • therapy
  • animal welfare
  • ethics
  • animal law

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 1494 KiB  
Article
Tend and Befriend in Horses: Partner Preferences, Lateralization, and Contextualization of Allogrooming in Two Socially Stable Herds of Quarter Horse Mares
by Emily Kieson, Amira A. Goma and Medhat Radi
Animals 2023, 13(2), 225; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13020225 - 7 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2532
Abstract
Studies show that horses express favoritism through shared proximity and time and demonstrate unique affiliative behaviors such as allogrooming (mutual scratching) with favorite conspecifics. Allogrooming also occurs more frequently during stress and has been observed to occur more frequently in domestic herds than [...] Read more.
Studies show that horses express favoritism through shared proximity and time and demonstrate unique affiliative behaviors such as allogrooming (mutual scratching) with favorite conspecifics. Allogrooming also occurs more frequently during stress and has been observed to occur more frequently in domestic herds than feral. The role of partner preference, lateralization, and duration of allogrooming as measures of social bonding has remained unclear. The present study looked at two socially stable herds of mares (n = 85, n = 115) to determine the frequency, duration, visual field of view and partner preference during allogrooming in both pasture settings (low stress) and confined settings (higher stress). One hundred and fifty-three videos for both herds were coded for allogrooming behaviors with 6.86 h recorded in confined conditions and 31.9 h in pasture settings. Six allogrooming sessions were observed in the pasture setting with an average duration of 163.11 s. In confined settings, a total of 118 allogrooming sessions were observed with an average duration of 40.98 s. Significant (p < 0.01) differences were found between settings for duration (s), number of allogrooming pairs, and frequency of allogrooming (per min) for each herd. All observed allogrooming sessions involved pairs of favored conspecifics (one partner per horse). The current study suggests that horses may have friendships that can be observed through the demonstration of specific affiliative behaviors during times of stress with more frequent, but shorter affiliative interactions with preferred partners during times of stress. This context suggests that horses adhere to the “tend and befriend” principles of friendship in animals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Advances in Equine Veterinary and Management)
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6 pages, 235 KiB  
Article
Body Condition Score Is Not Correlated to Gastric Ulcers in Non-Athlete Horses
by Sara Busechian, Luca Turini, Micaela Sgorbini, Francesca Bonelli, Lorenzo Pisello, Camillo Pieramati, Simona Orvieto and Fabrizio Rueca
Animals 2022, 12(19), 2637; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12192637 - 30 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1444
Abstract
Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome (EGUS) is a worldwide disease of the stomach that can be found in different categories of horses. Different clinical signs may be present, but a large number of horses are asymptomatic. The aim of this study was to identify [...] Read more.
Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome (EGUS) is a worldwide disease of the stomach that can be found in different categories of horses. Different clinical signs may be present, but a large number of horses are asymptomatic. The aim of this study was to identify a possible correlation between body condition score (BCS) and EGUS in a population of horses. A total of 203 non-athlete horses were submitted for gastroscopies, and the presence and severity of lesions of the glandular and squamous mucosa were recorded. A board-certified veterinarian blinded to the gastroscopy results assessed the BCS of the horse. In the study population, no correlation was found between BCS and the presence of gastric lesions in either the glandular or the squamous mucosa. The disease of the squamous or glandular mucosa cannot be excluded based only on the presence of normal or increased BCS in non-athlete horses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Advances in Equine Veterinary and Management)
8 pages, 239 KiB  
Article
Inflammatory Response and Electrocardiographic Examination in Horses Vaccinated against Equine Herpesvirus (Ehv-1)
by Vito Biondi, Alessandra Landi, Michela Pugliese, Giordana Merola and Annamaria Passantino
Animals 2022, 12(6), 778; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12060778 - 19 Mar 2022
Viewed by 2218
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate possible abnormalities in electrocardiographic findings, and changes in cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and inflammatory biomarkers (serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP)) after inactivated herpesvirus vaccine administration. Eighteen healthy horses were included. All animals were vaccinated with [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate possible abnormalities in electrocardiographic findings, and changes in cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and inflammatory biomarkers (serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP)) after inactivated herpesvirus vaccine administration. Eighteen healthy horses were included. All animals were vaccinated with Pneumoequine® (Merial, France) according to the protocol provided by the manufacturer. They were evaluated 1 day before the first dose of vaccination (D0), and 7 days (D1) and 14 days (D2) afterwards. At D0, D1, and D2, a blood sample was taken for the evaluation of SAA, cTnI, and CRP. An electrocardiographic examination was also performed. The data obtained suggested the possible involvement of the myocardium following vaccination against herpesvirus 1, mostly related to an inflammatory response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Advances in Equine Veterinary and Management)
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