Management of Wild Boar Populations—Achievements and Problems

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Ecology and Conservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 2098

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Guest Editor
Center for Animal Disease Modeling and Surveillance (CADMS), Tupper Hall, Department of Medicine & Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA
Interests: modeling; management; epidemiology; AI; conservation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wild boar (Sus scrofa) populations have traditionally been exposed to intensive hunting pressure, habitat loss, and other human activities. However, during recent decades, conservation efforts and social and environmental factors have increased their range, currently including the urban environment, and the abundance of wild boar populations, leading to a series of management and conservation challenges. These challenges have been exacerbated by the fast spread of African swine fever (ASF) around the world. With wild boar playing a major role in the transmission of ASF among countries, the disease has a devastating economic and social impact. The effective management of wild boar populations requires an integrated approach that considers both ecological and socio-economic factors in local contexts. Further research is needed to better understand how different management approaches affect wild boar populations in different contexts, as well as their interactions with pathogens and other species. This Special Issue covers topics such as population dynamics, spatial behavior, habitat use, management, epidemiology, hunting regulations, and human wildlife interactions and conflicts.

Dr. Carlos González-Crespo
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • population dynamics
  • spatial behavior
  • habitat use
  • management
  • epidemiology
  • hunting regulations
  • human–wildlife interactions
  • human–wildlife conflicts
  • wild pig
  • genetics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 4811 KiB  
Article
Human–Wildlife Conflict Mitigation Based on Damage, Distribution, and Activity: A Case Study of Wild Boar in Zhejiang, Eastern China
by Junchen Liu, Shanshan Zhao, Liping Tan, Jianwu Wang, Xiao Song, Shusheng Zhang, Feng Chen and Aichun Xu
Animals 2024, 14(11), 1639; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14111639 - 30 May 2024
Viewed by 164
Abstract
Human–wildlife conflicts are becoming increasingly common worldwide and are a challenge to biodiversity management. Compared with compensatory management, which often focuses on solving emergency conflicts, mitigation management allows decision-makers to better understand where the damage is distributed, how the species are distributed and [...] Read more.
Human–wildlife conflicts are becoming increasingly common worldwide and are a challenge to biodiversity management. Compared with compensatory management, which often focuses on solving emergency conflicts, mitigation management allows decision-makers to better understand where the damage is distributed, how the species are distributed and when the species conduct their activity. Here, we integrated data collected from 90 districts/counties’ damage surveys and 1271 camera traps to understand the damage status, abundance, density and activity rhythms of wild boar (Sus scrofa) in Zhejiang, Eastern China, from January 2019 to August 2023. We found that (1) wild boar–human conflicts were mainly distributed in the northwest and southwest mountainous regions of Zhejiang Province; (2) the total abundance of wild boar was 115,156 ± 24,072 individuals, indicating a growing trend over the past decade and a higher density in the western and southern regions; (3) wild boar exhibited different activity patterns across different damage regions, and the periods around 7:00, 11:00 and 16:00 represented activity peaks for wild boar in seriously damaged regions. The damage distribution, density, distribution and activity rhythms provide specific priority regions and activity intensity peaks for conflict mitigation. We believe that these findings based on the damage, distribution and activity could provide a scientific basis for mitigation management at the county level and enrich the framework of human–wildlife conflict mitigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Wild Boar Populations—Achievements and Problems)
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14 pages, 6263 KiB  
Article
Spatiotemporal Patterns of African Swine Fever in Wild Boar in the Russian Federation (2007–2022): Using Clustering Tools for Revealing High-Risk Areas
by Olga I. Zakharova, Fedor I. Korennoy, Ivan V. Yashin, Olga A. Burova, Elena A. Liskova, Nadezhda A. Gladkova, Irina V. Razheva and Andrey A. Blokhin
Animals 2023, 13(19), 3081; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13193081 - 2 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1392
Abstract
African swine fever (ASF) is an infectious disease that affects both domestic pigs (DPs) and wild boar (WB). The WB population plays an important role in the spread of ASF as the WB acts as a natural reservoir of the virus and transmits [...] Read more.
African swine fever (ASF) is an infectious disease that affects both domestic pigs (DPs) and wild boar (WB). The WB population plays an important role in the spread of ASF as the WB acts as a natural reservoir of the virus and transmits it to other susceptible wild and domestic pigs. Our study was aimed at revealing the areas with a high concentration of the WB population, and their potential relationships with the grouping of ASF cases in WB during the course of the ASF spread in the Russian Federation (2007–2022). We collected the annual data on WB numbers by municipalities within the regions of the most intensive ASF spread. We then conducted spatiotemporal analysis to identify clustering areas of ASF cases and compare them with the territories with a high density of WB population. We found that some of the territories with elevated ASF incidence in WB demonstrated spatial and temporal coincidence with the areas with a high WB population density. We also visualized the zones (“emerging hot spots”) with a statistically significant rise in the WB population density in recent years, which may be treated as areas of paramount importance for the application of surveillance measures and WB population control. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Management of Wild Boar Populations—Achievements and Problems)
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