Recent Advances in Equine Surgery and Sports Medicine

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Equids".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 3428

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606, USA
Interests: musculoskeletal biology; orthopedic; regenerative medicine; surgery

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Guest Editor
Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
Interests: surgery; orthopedics; regenerative therapies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to contribute an article to this Special Issue, titled “Recent Advances in Equine Surgery and Sports Medicine”. We aim to create an article collection to share innovative perspectives from specialists across transdisciplinary research backgrounds (e.g., surgery, sports medicine, imaging, podiatry) to begin to address clinical questions in the fields of equine surgery and sports medicine.

In this Special Issue, we will welcome original research articles, communications, reviews, commentaries, registered reports, and case reports which present or discuss topics related to equine surgery and sports medicine. Research areas may include, but are not limited to, equine orthopedics, soft tissue procedures, lameness, diagnostic analgesia, imaging, rehabilitation, and podiatry.

Dr. Drew W. Koch
Dr. Lynn M. Pezzanite
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 977 KiB  
Article
Infrared Spectroscopy of Synovial Fluid Shows Accuracy as an Early Biomarker in an Equine Model of Traumatic Osteoarthritis
by Luca Panizzi, Matthieu Vignes, Keren E. Dittmer, Mark R. Waterland, Chris W. Rogers, Hiroki Sano, C. Wayne McIlwraith and Christopher B. Riley
Animals 2024, 14(7), 986; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14070986 - 22 Mar 2024
Viewed by 768
Abstract
Osteoarthritis is a leading cause of lameness and joint disease in horses. A simple, economical, and accurate diagnostic test is required for routine screening for OA. This study aimed to evaluate infrared (IR)-based synovial fluid biomarker profiling to detect early changes associated with [...] Read more.
Osteoarthritis is a leading cause of lameness and joint disease in horses. A simple, economical, and accurate diagnostic test is required for routine screening for OA. This study aimed to evaluate infrared (IR)-based synovial fluid biomarker profiling to detect early changes associated with a traumatically induced model of equine carpal osteoarthritis (OA). Unilateral carpal OA was induced arthroscopically in 9 of 17 healthy thoroughbred fillies; the remainder served as Sham-operated controls. The median age of both groups was 2 years. Synovial fluid (SF) was obtained before surgical induction of OA (Day 0) and weekly until Day 63. IR absorbance spectra were acquired from dried SF films. Following spectral pre-processing, predictive models using random forests were used to differentiate OA, Sham, and Control samples. The accuracy for distinguishing between OA and any other joint group was 80%. The classification accuracy by sampling day was 87%. For paired classification tasks, the accuracies by joint were 75% for OA vs. OA Control and 70% for OA vs. Sham. The accuracy for separating horses by group (OA vs. Sham) was 68%. In conclusion, SF IR spectroscopy accurately discriminates traumatically induced OA joints from controls. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Equine Surgery and Sports Medicine)
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11 pages, 238 KiB  
Article
Comparison of In Vitro Bacterial Susceptibility to Common and Novel Equine Wound Care Dressings
by Merrill Simpson, Dean A. Hendrickson, Doreene R. Hyatt and Sangeeta Rao
Animals 2024, 14(5), 776; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14050776 - 1 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1104
Abstract
Antimicrobial resistance is becoming a problem of concern in the veterinary field, necessitating the use of effective topical treatments to aid the healing of wounds. Honey has been used for thousands of years for its medicinal properties, but in recent years medical-grade Manuka [...] Read more.
Antimicrobial resistance is becoming a problem of concern in the veterinary field, necessitating the use of effective topical treatments to aid the healing of wounds. Honey has been used for thousands of years for its medicinal properties, but in recent years medical-grade Manuka honey has been used to treat infected wounds. The goal of this study was to determine the relative susceptibility of four common equine wound pathogens to ten different types of antimicrobial agents based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The pathogens studied include ATCC lab-acclimated Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and one from an equine sample submitted to the Colorado State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (Streptococcus equi ssp. zooepidemicus (Streptococcus zooepidemicus)). An additional goal of the study was to describe the comparison of bactericidal activity of medical-grade Manuka honey, local honey, and commercial, food-grade honey to other commonly used wound dressings (20% hypertonic saline, silver sulfadiazine cream, PHMB gauze, and PHMB foam). The objective is to provide veterinary practitioners with comparative data on the use of a variety of antimicrobial dressings for inhibiting the growth of common wound bacteria. MIC and MBC for Manuka, store, and local honeys were comparable to those of sterile gauze, sugar, and hypertonic saline. Across bacterial species, local honey proved to have more bactericidal activity when compared to Manuka honey and commercial, food-grade honey. The MIC and MBC for PHMB gauze and foam was consistently at a higher dilution compared to the other antimicrobials. The majority of antimicrobials exhibited stronger inhibitory and bactericidal activity against a Streptococcus zooepidemicus isolate obtained from a wound compared to other bacteria that were ATCC lab-acclimated. Additional research for in vivo applications needs to be done to see whether differences exist in effective wound management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Equine Surgery and Sports Medicine)
13 pages, 954 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Antimicrobial Protocols and Other Perioperative Factors on Postoperative Complications in Horses Undergoing Celiotomy: A Retrospective Analysis, 2008–2021
by Meagan Rockow, Gregg Griffenhagen, Gabriele Landolt, Dean Hendrickson and Lynn Pezzanite
Animals 2023, 13(22), 3573; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13223573 - 19 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1060
Abstract
Recognition of antimicrobial resistance in equine practice has increased over the past decade. The objective of this study was to provide an updated retrospective review of antimicrobial regimens in one tertiary referral hospital and to evaluate the association with postoperative complications. A secondary [...] Read more.
Recognition of antimicrobial resistance in equine practice has increased over the past decade. The objective of this study was to provide an updated retrospective review of antimicrobial regimens in one tertiary referral hospital and to evaluate the association with postoperative complications. A secondary objective was to evaluate other perioperative factors including surgical procedure, anesthetic and recovery parameters, and the effect of perioperative medications on complications and outcomes. A computerized search of medical records was performed to identify horses undergoing exploratory celiotomy from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2021. A total of 742 celiotomies were performed (608 completed, 134 terminated intraoperatively). Factors recorded were evaluated using logistic regression for the presence of either incisional infection, postoperative ileus, or other complications postoperatively. Antimicrobial type or timing (pre-, intra-, or postoperative) were not associated with decreased risk of incisional infection or postoperative ileus; however, the duration of NSAID use was positively associated with incisional infection (OR 1.14 per day). Lidocaine and alpha-2-agonist administration postoperatively were also associated with increased incidence of postoperative ileus (OR 21.5 and 1.56, respectively). Poor recovery quality (OR 4.69), the addition of other antimicrobials besides penicillin/gentamicin postoperatively (OR 3.63), and an increased number of different NSAID classes used (OR 1.46 per additional) were associated with other complications. Implementation of enterotomy was associated with decreased risk of other complications (OR 0.64). These findings provide an updated summary of factors associated with postoperative complications in horses undergoing celiotomy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Equine Surgery and Sports Medicine)
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