Naturally Occurring Canine Lower Urinary Tract Neoplasia

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2024 | Viewed by 4734

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Clinical Sciences and Advanced Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
Interests: surgical oncology; interventional radiology; minimally invasive surgery; sentinel lymph node mapping; tumor imaging; urinary tumors

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Guest Editor
Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, University of California-Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, CA 95616, USA
Interests: surgical oncology; interventional radiology; minimally invasive surgery; embolization/chemoembolization; stenting; ablation; urinary tumors; prostate tumors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urothelial carcinoma is the most common neoplastic condition of the urinary tract of dogs. Despite its relative prevalence, the prognosis remains poor due to the highly aggressive nature of this disease both locally and systemically, and many aspects of this cancer pose unique treatment challenges. In addition, naturally occurring invasive canine urothelial carcinoma serves as an important spontaneous large animal model for this disease in humans, which also carries a poor prognosis. Because of the high disease prevalence, poor outcomes, and important translational potential, research advancements in the field of canine lower urinary tract neoplasia need to be explored. This has prompted the journal Animals to call for a Special Issue entitled “Naturally Occurring Canine Lower Urinary Tract Neoplasia”. This letter is an invitation to contribute articles on spontaneous canine lower urinary tract neoplasia (including invasive urothelial carcinoma, prostate carcinoma, and other tumor types) to this Special Issue. Innovative manuscripts on multiple facets of canine lower urinary tract neoplasia such as disease presentation, diagnosis and staging, prognosis, and treatment via surgical, medical, radiation, interventional, and immuno-oncology modalities are invited to be submitted to this Special Issue with the aim of advancing this field. Contributions can be in any of the article formats supported by this journal, particularly (but not only) in the form of research and review articles.

Dr. Maureen A. Griffin
Dr. William T. N. Culp
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • neoplasia
  • lower urinary tract
  • canine
  • invasive urothelial carcinoma
  • transitional cell carcinoma
  • prostate carcinoma

Published Papers (3 papers)

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14 pages, 3453 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Tumor-Associated Tissue Eosinophilia (TATE) and Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs) in Canine Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder
by Rita Files, Victor Okwu, Nuno Topa, Marisa Sousa, Filipe Silva, Paula Rodrigues, Leonor Delgado, Justina Prada and Isabel Pires
Animals 2024, 14(3), 519; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14030519 - 05 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a significant neoplasm in dogs, characterized by a poor prognosis and a high metastatic potential. These canine spontaneous tumors share many characteristics with human transitional cell carcinoma, making them an excellent comparative model. The role [...] Read more.
Transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a significant neoplasm in dogs, characterized by a poor prognosis and a high metastatic potential. These canine spontaneous tumors share many characteristics with human transitional cell carcinoma, making them an excellent comparative model. The role of inflammatory infiltration in tumor development and progression is frequently contradictory, especially concerning tumor-associated tissue eosinophils (TATE) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). This study aims to analyze TATE and TAMs in canine transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. Congo Red staining was used to identify TATE, and immunohistochemistry was performed to detect TAMs in 34 cases of canine transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder carcinomas, categorized into low and high grades. Statistically significant differences were observed between the number of eosinophils and macrophages in the two groups of tumors. The number of TATE was higher in low-grade malignant tumors, but the number of TAMs was higher in high-grade tumors. Our findings suggest the importance of TATEs and TAMs in the aggressiveness of canine transitional cell carcinoma and propose their potential use as therapeutic targets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Naturally Occurring Canine Lower Urinary Tract Neoplasia)
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16 pages, 3240 KiB  
Article
Artificial Intelligence to Predict the BRAF V595E Mutation in Canine Urinary Bladder Urothelial Carcinomas
by Leonore Küchler, Caroline Posthaus, Kathrin Jäger, Franco Guscetti, Louise van der Weyden, Wolf von Bomhard, Jarno M. Schmidt, Dima Farra, Heike Aupperle-Lellbach, Alexandra Kehl, Sven Rottenberg and Simone de Brot
Animals 2023, 13(15), 2404; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13152404 - 25 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1452
Abstract
In dogs, the BRAF mutation (V595E) is common in bladder and prostate cancer and represents a specific diagnostic marker. Recent advantages in artificial intelligence (AI) offer new opportunities in the field of tumour marker detection. While AI histology studies have been conducted in [...] Read more.
In dogs, the BRAF mutation (V595E) is common in bladder and prostate cancer and represents a specific diagnostic marker. Recent advantages in artificial intelligence (AI) offer new opportunities in the field of tumour marker detection. While AI histology studies have been conducted in humans to detect BRAF mutation in cancer, comparable studies in animals are lacking. In this study, we used commercially available AI histology software to predict BRAF mutation in whole slide images (WSI) of bladder urothelial carcinomas (UC) stained with haematoxylin and eosin (HE), based on a training (n = 81) and a validation set (n = 96). Among 96 WSI, 57 showed identical PCR and AI-based BRAF predictions, resulting in a sensitivity of 58% and a specificity of 63%. The sensitivity increased substantially to 89% when excluding small or poor-quality tissue sections. Test reliability depended on tumour differentiation (p < 0.01), presence of inflammation (p < 0.01), slide quality (p < 0.02) and sample size (p < 0.02). Based on a small subset of cases with available adjacent non-neoplastic urothelium, AI was able to distinguish malignant from benign epithelium. This is the first study to demonstrate the use of AI histology to predict BRAF mutation status in canine UC. Despite certain limitations, the results highlight the potential of AI in predicting molecular alterations in routine tissue sections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Naturally Occurring Canine Lower Urinary Tract Neoplasia)
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16 pages, 342 KiB  
Systematic Review
A Systematic Review of Canine Cystectomy: Indications, Techniques, and Outcomes
by Isabella Hildebrandt, William T. N. Culp and Maureen A. Griffin
Animals 2023, 13(18), 2896; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13182896 - 13 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1694
Abstract
This review provides a summary of the literature encompassing partial and total cystectomy procedures in dogs and subsequent conclusions that can be drawn. Surgical excision as a component of treatment for lower urinary tract neoplasia in dogs may enhance survival time and result [...] Read more.
This review provides a summary of the literature encompassing partial and total cystectomy procedures in dogs and subsequent conclusions that can be drawn. Surgical excision as a component of treatment for lower urinary tract neoplasia in dogs may enhance survival time and result in acceptable quality of life, though risk for surgical complications is substantial, particularly following total cystectomy procedures. However, for dogs with urothelial carcinoma, cystectomy is generally not considered curative and disease progression is common. Appropriate case selection and thorough preoperative discussion with owners regarding potential risks and benefits of cystectomy are imperative for successful outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Naturally Occurring Canine Lower Urinary Tract Neoplasia)
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