Equine Musculoskeletal System: Advances and Clinical Applications of Diagnostic Imaging and Functional Research

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Equids".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 2380

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Large Animal Diseases and Clinic, Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences (WULS—SGGW), 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: equine disease; diagnostic imaging; surface electromyography (sEMG); functional electrical stimulation (FES); image processing; signal processing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Large Animal Diseases and Clinic, Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences (WULS—SGGW), 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: equine surgery; sports medicine; musculoskeletal diagnostic imaging; musculoskeletal functional assess-ment; lameness; poor performance

E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Large Animal Diseases and Clinic, Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences (WULS—SGGW), 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: equine practice; diagnostic imaging; computed tomography (CT); dual-energy computed tomography (du-al-energy CT); magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); positron emission tomography (PET)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many studies in musculoskeletal research on human and animal models are now looking for new techniques rather than conventional modalities of the functional assessment and 3D imaging of bones, joints, muscles, tendons, and fascia to enable the early detection of their failure or the failure of their systems. Given that recent advances in equipment and room modifications allow for regular multidetector CT and dual-energy CT in standing sedated horses, CT-based anatomical 3D models, segmentations, and CT-based measurements become clinically applicable. Similarly, the adaptation of wireless, multi-sensor sEMG systems and the widespread use of lameness locators in everyday practice shed new light on muscle functional assessment in equine clinical practice.

Since the utilization of advanced diagnostic imaging and functional tests by practitioners leads to an increasing understanding of the musculoskeletal system in horses, this Special Issue aims at gathering recent studies utilizing advanced diagnosis imaging, or advanced approaches to conventional diagnostic imaging, and functional assessments of the musculoskeletal system in equine veterinary practice.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following: advanced diagnostic imaging, image processing, image segmentation, image feature extraction, functional assessment, signal filtration, and signal feature extraction in cases of muscle, bone, joint, tendon, and fascia diseases in horses; however, the identification of a normal morphological and functional spectrum in addition to its discrimination from pathological conditions are also welcomed.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Malgorzata Domino
Prof. Dr. Bernard Turek
Dr. Tomasz Jasiński
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • muscle diseases
  • bone and joint diseases
  • tendon and fascia diseases
  • diagnostic imaging
  • CT
  • dual-energy CT
  • MRI
  • sEMG
  • FES
  • image and signal processing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 675 KiB  
Article
The Application of Infrared Thermography in the Assessment of BEMER Physical Vascular Therapy on Body Surface Temperature in Racing Thoroughbreds: A Preliminary Study
by Karolina Nawrot, Maria Soroko-Dubrovina, Paulina Zielińska, Krzysztof Dudek and Kevin Howell
Animals 2024, 14(11), 1538; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14111538 - 23 May 2024
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Abstract
The study aimed to evaluate the impact of BEMER (Physical Vascular Therapy) on body surface temperature using infrared thermography (IRT) in the distal parts of the forelimbs in Thoroughbreds. The study tested the hypothesis that BEMER therapy leads to an increase in body [...] Read more.
The study aimed to evaluate the impact of BEMER (Physical Vascular Therapy) on body surface temperature using infrared thermography (IRT) in the distal parts of the forelimbs in Thoroughbreds. The study tested the hypothesis that BEMER therapy leads to an increase in body surface temperature and blood vessel diameter in the distal parts of the forelimbs. The study involved 16 horses, split into 2 groups: active BEMER (n = 8) and sham (n = 8). The active BEMER group had BEMER boots applied to the distal parts of the forelimbs, whereas the sham group had BEMER boots applied without activation of the device. Both groups underwent IRT examination to detect changes in body surface temperature, followed by ultrasonographic examination to assess changes in vein and artery diameter before (BT) and just after (JAT) therapy. The IRT examination was repeated 15 min after BEMER therapy (15AT). There were no significant body surface temperature differences between BT and JAT in any regions of interest (ROIs) in either group. In the active BEMER group, the ROIs did not change significantly at 15AT, compared to the temperatures measured at BT (except for the hooves). At 15AT the temperature of all the ROIs (except the fetlock bone) dropped significantly in the sham group. In the ultrasonographic examination, there was a significant increase in vein and artery diameter in the study group JAT, whereas the sham group had a significant increase only in artery diameter JAT. These results suggest an effect of BEMER on stimulating blood circulation in the distal parts of the forelimbs in clinically healthy horses. IRT did not identify changes in skin surface temperature after BEMER therapy at the distal parts of the forelimbs. Full article
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Review

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16 pages, 301 KiB  
Review
Advances in the Clinical Diagnostics to Equine Back Pain: A Review of Imaging and Functional Modalities
by Natalia Domańska-Kruppa, Małgorzata Wierzbicka and Elżbieta Stefanik
Animals 2024, 14(5), 698; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14050698 - 23 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Back pain is common in ridden horses. Back diseases in horses include Impinging Dorsal Spinous Processes, Ventral Spondylosis, Osteoarthritis of Articular Process, Intervertebral Discs Disease, Vertebral Fractures, Conformational Abnormalities, Desmopathy of the Supraspinous Ligament, Desmopathy of the Intraspinous Ligament, and Longissimus Muscle Strain. [...] Read more.
Back pain is common in ridden horses. Back diseases in horses include Impinging Dorsal Spinous Processes, Ventral Spondylosis, Osteoarthritis of Articular Process, Intervertebral Discs Disease, Vertebral Fractures, Conformational Abnormalities, Desmopathy of the Supraspinous Ligament, Desmopathy of the Intraspinous Ligament, and Longissimus Muscle Strain. Back pain may also develop as a result of lameness (particularly hindlimb lameness). A poorly fitting saddle and an unbalanced rider are also considered important factors influencing the development of back pain in horses. The conventional diagnosis of equine back pain includes a clinical examination and diagnostic imaging examination using ultrasound, radiography, and thermography. Advanced diagnostic modalities of equine back pain involve the objectification of standard procedures through the use of algometers, a lameness locator, biometric mats, and the geometric morphometrics method. In addition to modern diagnostic methods, such as computed tomography and scintigraphy, advances in the diagnosis of equine back pain include the use of electromyography and functional electrical stimulation. The aim of this review article is to familiarize clinicians with the usefulness and capabilities of conventional diagnostic protocols and advanced diagnostic modalities. Although orthopedic examination and traditional diagnostic methods will remain the foundation of the diagnosis of back diseases, modern methods meet the growing expectations towards high-performance horses and allow for deeper diagnostics and objective monitoring of rehabilitation and training progress. Full article

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Tentative paper title: APPLICATION OF INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY IN THE ASSESMENT OF A BIO-ELECTROMAGNETIC ENERGY REGULATION ON BODY SURFACE TEMPERATURE CHANGES IN RACING THOROUGHBREDS

Submitting author: Prof. Dr. Maria Soroko

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