Advances in the Diagnosis of Parasitic Infections in Animals

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2024 | Viewed by 6614

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, D04 W6F6 Dublin, Ireland
Interests: veterinary parasitology; anthelmintic resistance; Cryptosporidium; Toxoplasma; tick-borne diseases; parasite control

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases, School of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: veterinary parasitology; anthelmintic resistance; echinococcus
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rapid, reliable and highly sensitive diagnostic tests are needed for the effective control and treatment parasitic diseases in animals. The rapid increase in parasites developing resistance against anti-parasitic drugs have also highlighted the need for the development of improved, highly sensitive early diagnostic assays. Recent advances in technology, molecular biology and proteomics have opened many new avenues for the development of improved diagnostics tools. These include immunoassays, nucleic- and proteomic-based approaches as well as machine-learning technologies.

In this special issue, we aim to show case the most recent research and developments in the diagnosis of parasitic infections in animals. We welcome both original research papers and reviews dealing with the topic.

Prof. Dr. Theo de Waal
Dr. Elias Papadopoulos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • diagnosis
  • rapid-tests
  • parasitology
  • helminths
  • protozoa
  • entomology
  • PCR
  • immunoassays
  • antigen-assays
  • microscopy
  • biomarkers
  • rapid diagnostic tests
  • point-of-care tests

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

11 pages, 1523 KiB  
Article
Estimating the Prevalence and Factors Affecting the Shedding of Helminth Eggs in Irish Equine Populations
by Nagwa Elghryani, Trish McOwan, Craig Mincher, Vivienne Duggan and Theo de Waal
Animals 2023, 13(4), 581; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13040581 - 07 Feb 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1645
Abstract
Gastrointestinal helminths are ubiquitous in horse populations across the world. Intensive anthelmintic treatments have succeeded in controlling some of the pathogenic effects of these parasites. However, the success of anthelmintic drugs has been threatened by the development of widespread resistance to those most [...] Read more.
Gastrointestinal helminths are ubiquitous in horse populations across the world. Intensive anthelmintic treatments have succeeded in controlling some of the pathogenic effects of these parasites. However, the success of anthelmintic drugs has been threatened by the development of widespread resistance to those most commonly used. To develop improved control strategies, information on helminth distribution patterns is needed, which can be obtained by identifying animals regarded as high egg shedders and taking age, gender, and other risk factors into account. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of helminth infection in the Irish equine population using faecal egg counts and to evaluate the effects of risk factors on these faecal egg counts. For the 2700 horses that were included in the study, the prevalence of gastrointestinal helminth infection was 52.40%, 4.22%, 2.59%, and 0.89% for strongyle species, Parascaris spp., Anoplocephala spp., and Strongyloides westeri, respectively. Overall, strongyle faecal egg counts from 159 farms averaged 250.22 eggs per gram. Both age and season had significant effects on strongyle egg shedding. In conclusion, this study revealed high prevalence of strongyle worm infection in horses on Irish farms, which highlights the need to optimize and develop good management practices and strategic deworming. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Diagnosis of Parasitic Infections in Animals)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 2371 KiB  
Article
Comparative Metabolome Analyses of Ivermectin-Resistant and -Susceptible Strains of Haemonchus contortus
by Waresi Tuersong, Xin Liu, Yifan Wang, Simin Wu, Peixi Qin, Shengnang Zhu, Feng Liu, Chunqun Wang and Min Hu
Animals 2023, 13(3), 456; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13030456 - 28 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1487
Abstract
Resistance to anthelmintics such as ivermectin (IVM) is currently a major problem in the treatment of Haemonchus contortus, an important parasitic nematode of small ruminants. Although many advances have been made in understanding the IVM resistance mechanism, its exact mechanism remains unclear [...] Read more.
Resistance to anthelmintics such as ivermectin (IVM) is currently a major problem in the treatment of Haemonchus contortus, an important parasitic nematode of small ruminants. Although many advances have been made in understanding the IVM resistance mechanism, its exact mechanism remains unclear for H. contortus. Therefore, understanding the resistance mechanism becomes increasingly important for controlling haemonchosis. Recent research showed that the metabolic state of bacteria influences their susceptibility to antibiotics. However, little information is available on the roles of metabolites and metabolic pathways in IVM resistance of H. contortus. In this study, comparative analyses of the metabolomics of IVM-susceptible and -resistant adult H. contortus worms were carried out to explore the role of H. contortus metabolism in IVM resistance. In total, 705 metabolites belonging to 42 categories were detected, and 86 differential metabolites (17 upregulated and 69 downregulated) were identified in the IVM-resistant strain compared to the susceptible one. A KEGG pathway analysis showed that these 86 differential metabolites were enriched in 42 pathways that mainly included purine metabolism; the biosynthesis of amino acids; glycine, serine, and threonine metabolism; and cysteine and methionine metabolism. These results showed that amino acid metabolism may be mediated by the uptake of IVM and related with IVM resistance in H. contortus. This study contributes to our understanding of the mechanisms of IVM resistance and may provide effective approaches to manage infection by resistant strains of H. contortus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Diagnosis of Parasitic Infections in Animals)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 1389 KiB  
Article
Retrospective Survey of Dog and Cat Endoparasites in Ireland: Antigen Detection
by Theo de Waal, Sandra Aungier, Amanda Lawlor, Troy Goddu, Matthew Jones and Donald Szlosek
Animals 2023, 13(1), 137; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13010137 - 29 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2461
Abstract
Endoparasites of dogs and cats, play an important role in both veterinary medicine and public health. Untreated and stray dogs and cats, in particular, play an important role in contaminating the environment with important zoonotic parasites. Thus, the aim of this study was [...] Read more.
Endoparasites of dogs and cats, play an important role in both veterinary medicine and public health. Untreated and stray dogs and cats, in particular, play an important role in contaminating the environment with important zoonotic parasites. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of intestinal parasites in stray dogs and cats using highly sensitive and specific copro-antigen tests. Archive faecal samples from previous surveys conducted between 2016–2019 from dogs (n = 789) and cats (n = 241) were included in this study. The IDEXX Fecal Dx™ antigen panel was used for the detection of Toxocara, hookworms, Trichuris and the SNAP™ Giardia antigen assay was used for the detection of Giardia infection. Giardia duodenalis was the most common parasite (26%, n = 205) detected in the dogs, followed by ascarids (17.6%, n = 139) and hookworms (5.3%, n = 42). Trichuris vulpis was only detected in 1 dog. Ascarids (23.2%, n = 56) was the most common parasite detected in the cats, followed by Giardia (12.9%, n = 31) and hookworms (n = 7, 2.9%). No whipworms were detected in cats. Overall, there was little difference in the positivity between sexes in both dogs and cats. However, in terms of age, adolescent dogs (<3 years) and kittens (<1 year) had the highest parasite prevalence overall, with G. duodenalis and ascarids being the most prevalent. This study shows a high prevalence of parasite infection in untreated and stray dogs and cats in the greater Dublin area in Ireland. Since they live in synanthropic conditions and can roam over vast distances they can contaminate public areas and pose a risk to both humans and owned pets that utilise these spaces. It is therefore important to raise public awareness and increase the knowledge on zoonotic parasites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Diagnosis of Parasitic Infections in Animals)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop