Anesthesia and Analgesia in Companion Animals Surgery

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 1430

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Messina, Viale Palatucci, 13, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: veterinary pharmacology and toxicology; hematological biomarkers; inflammatory response; oxidative stress; reactive oxygen species; animal welfare

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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Science, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
Interests: anaesthesia; surgery; small animals; large animals
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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences Medicine, University of Parma, 43126 Parma, Italy
Interests: animal health; drug delivery; smart devices for drug delivery; biomaterials; surgery; anesthesiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Surgery induces inflammatory oxidative stress. Inflammation, pain and stress induced by surgery could negatively influence the healing of the excised tissues and the evolution of surgical lesions. The anesthetic protocol chosen could be decisive in the healing of the tissues and in the evolution of any pathologies present. Balanced general anesthesia can reduce the side effects induced by surgical stress. There are several classes of drugs used to induce general anesthesia and control perioperative pain in companion animals: opioids, α-2 adrenergic receptor agonists, local anesthetics nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, sedatives, hypnotics, halogenated anesthetics, and neuromuscular blocking cyclohexamines. Surgery itself can cause significant physiological inflammatory oxidative stress. Several studies in humans and laboratory animals have shown that there is an increase in inflammatory oxidative stress after surgery. However, there are few studies on companion animals.

We are pleased to invite you in this Special Issue aims to evaluate the effect of balanced general anesthesia protocols on the inflammatory oxidative stress induced by surgery in pets, in order to suggest perioperative therapeutic programs aimed at preserving the body from post-surgical pathologies.

Suggested themes and article types for submissions. Influence of anesthetics and analgesics on haematological, biochemical and inflammatory oxidative stress parameters in pets undergoing surgery.

Dr. Vincenzo Nava
Dr. Giovanna L. Costa
Prof. Dr. Fabio Leonardi
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • anesthesia
  • analgesia
  • companion animals
  • hematological
  • biochemical parameters
  • inflammatory oxidative status
  • surgery

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 5613 KiB  
Article
Modified Ultrasound-Guided Dorsal Quadratus Lumborum Block in Cat Cadavers
by Gonzalo Polo-Paredes, Francisco G. Laredo, Francisco Gil, Marta Soler, Amalia Agut and Eliseo Belda
Animals 2023, 13(24), 3798; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13243798 - 09 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1167
Abstract
The quadratus lumborum (QL) block is an ultrasound-guided locoregional anesthesia technique which aims to provide analgesia to the abdomen. The main objective of this study was to assess a modified ultrasound-guided dorsal QL block in cat cadavers. For this purpose, a volume of [...] Read more.
The quadratus lumborum (QL) block is an ultrasound-guided locoregional anesthesia technique which aims to provide analgesia to the abdomen. The main objective of this study was to assess a modified ultrasound-guided dorsal QL block in cat cadavers. For this purpose, a volume of 0.4 mL kg−1 of a mixture of iopromide and methylene blue was administered between the psoas minor muscle and the vertebral body (VB) of the first lumbar vertebra, and its distribution was assessed in thirteen cat cadavers. We hypothesized that this injection point would be feasible, offering a more cranial distribution of the injectate and a more consistent staining of the truncus sympathicus. The study was divided into two phases. Phase 1 consisted of an anatomical study (three cadavers were dissected). Phase 2 consisted of the ultrasound-guided administration of the injectate and the assessment of its distribution by computed tomography and anatomical dissection. The results showed a consistent distribution of contrast media within five (4–8) VBs from T10 to L5. Methylene blue stained three (2–6) rami ventrales, affecting T11 (10%), T12 (20%), T13 (60%), L1 (85%), L2 (95%) and L3 (65%). The truncus sympathicus was dyed in all cadavers with a spread of five (3–7) VBs. Finally, the splanchnicus major nerve was stained in all cadavers (100%). These results suggest that this technique could provide analgesia to the abdominal viscera and the abdominal wall, probably with the exception of the cranial aspects of the abdominal wall. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anesthesia and Analgesia in Companion Animals Surgery)
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