Forensic Toxicology and Pathology in Veterinary Medicine

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2024 | Viewed by 1025

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Unit of Pathology, Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80137 Naples, Italy
Interests: veterinary forensic medicine; forensic science; veterinary pathology; environmental diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, Unit of Pathology, University of Naples Federico II, 80127 Napoli, Italy
Interests: forensics; clinical forensic medicine; forensic medicine; forensic; pathology; osteology

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, 80137 Naples, Italy
Interests: veterinary pathology; veterinary forensic pathology; domestic and laboratory animal pathology; comparative medicine; environmental diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Veterinary forensic pathology and toxicology are sub-fields of veterinary forensic medicine, which study the applications of toxicological and pathological knowledge in legal veterinary contexts. The range of interest is very broad and includes the detection of drugs in the blood, organs and urine; the identification of poison in animals; the identification of unlawful killing and animal abuse cases; and the diagnosis of perioperative and anesthetic deaths, drowning, thermal injuries, traumatic death, sudden death and malpractice.

In this Special Issue of Animals, we aim to gather high-quality papers that may contribute to an international scientific platform by focusing on all fields related to veterinary forensic pathology and toxicology. Topics include, but are not limited to, discussions relating to postmortem toxicology, forensic drug testing and new forensic approaches in the identification of unlawful killing and animal abuse cases.

Dr. Giuseppe Piegari
Dr. Ilaria D'Aquino
Dr. Davide De Biase
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • veterinary forensic pathology
  • veterinary forensic toxicology
  • drug testing
  • unlawful killing
  • animal abuse cases

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

12 pages, 5922 KiB  
Article
Feline Forensics: Revealing the Unique Decomposition of Cats
by Kelly Bagsby, Adam W. Stern and Krystal R. Hans
Animals 2024, 14(7), 996; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14070996 - 24 Mar 2024
Viewed by 660
Abstract
Limited data about the differences between the decomposition of animals with fur exist within the forensic veterinary medicine discipline. Due to the sheer number of animals used as animal models and the number of animals that exist, determining stages of decomposition that are [...] Read more.
Limited data about the differences between the decomposition of animals with fur exist within the forensic veterinary medicine discipline. Due to the sheer number of animals used as animal models and the number of animals that exist, determining stages of decomposition that are applicable for all species is difficult. Typically, assessing what stage of decomposition a decedent is in is subjective due to the visual assessment of decomposition changes. A method developed to rectify this issue was the total body score (TBS) method, which assigns a numerical value based on the degree of decomposition to the head, torso, and limbs. The purpose of this study was to examine the decomposition of cats, identify any unique decomposition characteristics, and determine the rate of decomposition using total body score and accumulated degree days (ADDs). Twelve domestic short-haired cats were placed in a grassy field in West Lafayette, IN. An assessment of TBS was documented for each cat and each experimental group. An exponential relationship between TBS and ADD was documented. Overall, there was not a significant difference in the rate of decomposition or total body scores between the groups (Z = −91.00, p = 0.0672). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forensic Toxicology and Pathology in Veterinary Medicine)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop