Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing in Veterinary Clinical Microbiology

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2024 | Viewed by 2992

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010, USA
Interests: antimicrobial resistance; WGS; veterinary microbiology; preventive medicine; Staphylococcus; Salmonella; Campylobacter

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am editing a new article collection entitled “Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing in Veterinary Clinical Microbiology”, and I wanted to personally get in touch to ask whether you would be interested in contributing a manuscript.

Antibiotic resistance in animals is a global growing concern, due to the emergence of pathogens with multi-drug resistance, including clinically important antibiotics and the risk of treatment failures.

The findings of this Special Issue will contribute to our knowledge on veterinary pathogens, with relevant importance for clinicians in the veterinary area.

In collaboration with Animals, we are interested in manuscripts that describe zoonotic or veterinary microorganisms and important findings related to antimicrobial susceptibility.

We encourage you to submit an abstract by the 20th of June. The manuscript submission deadline is the 20th of October.

Please note that publishing fees are applied to accepted articles, but I could support you in this regard depending on the type of paper.

Dr. Mariela Elizabeth Srednik
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobial resistance
  • antimicrobials
  • veterinary
  • clinical microbiology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 320 KiB  
Article
Microbiological Survey and Evaluation of Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Microorganisms Obtained from Suspect Cases of Canine Otitis Externa in Gran Canaria, Spain
by Rubén S. Rosales, Ana S. Ramírez, Eduardo Moya-Gil, Sara N. de la Fuente, Alejandro Suárez-Pérez and José B. Poveda
Animals 2024, 14(5), 742; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14050742 - 27 Feb 2024
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Abstract
A retrospective study of microbiological laboratory results from 2020 to 2022, obtained from a veterinary diagnostic laboratory of the island of Gran Canaria, Spain, focused on canine otitis cases, was performed. The objective of this study was to analyze the pathogen distribution, antimicrobial [...] Read more.
A retrospective study of microbiological laboratory results from 2020 to 2022, obtained from a veterinary diagnostic laboratory of the island of Gran Canaria, Spain, focused on canine otitis cases, was performed. The objective of this study was to analyze the pathogen distribution, antimicrobial susceptibility, prevalence of multidrug resistant phenotypes and the role of coinfections in otitis cases in order to provide up-to-date evidence that could support effective control strategies for this prevalent pathology. A total of 604 submissions were processed for the diagnosis of canine external otitis. Of the samples analyzed, 472 were positive for bacterial or fungal growth (78.1%; 95% CI: 74.8–81.4%). A total of 558 microbiological diagnoses were obtained, divided in 421 bacterial (75.4%; 95% CI: 71.8–79.0%) and 137 fungal (24.6%; 95% CI: 20.9–28.1%) identifications. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, Malassezia pachydermatis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most prevalent microorganisms detected in clinical cases of otitis. High level antimicrobial resistance was found for Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.7%), Proteus mirabilis (29.4%), Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (25.1%) and Escherichia coli (19%). Multidrug-resistant phenotypes were observed in 47% of the bacteria isolated. In addition, a 26.4% prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was detected. The high prevalence of antimicrobial resistant phenotypes in these bacteria highlights the current necessity for constant up-to-date prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility data that can support evidence-based strategies to effectively tackle this animal and public health concern. Full article
13 pages, 826 KiB  
Article
Canine Pyothorax: Comparison of Culture and Susceptibility Results to the BSAVA PROTECT ME Poster and Other Published Recommended Antimicrobial Use Guidelines
by Iris Heinsoo, David J. Walker, Kine Bergum Hjellegjerde, Julia W. Y. Tang and Alison L. Moores
Animals 2023, 13(24), 3843; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13243843 - 13 Dec 2023
Viewed by 893
Abstract
The most common bacterial isolates in dogs with pyothorax include mixed anaerobes, Enterobacteriaceae (especially Escherichia coli), Pasteurella spp., Streptococcus spp., and Staphylococcus spp. A fluoroquinolone with amoxicillin (±clavulanate) or a fluoroquinolone with clindamycin are the most commonly recommended empirical antimicrobials whilst pending [...] Read more.
The most common bacterial isolates in dogs with pyothorax include mixed anaerobes, Enterobacteriaceae (especially Escherichia coli), Pasteurella spp., Streptococcus spp., and Staphylococcus spp. A fluoroquinolone with amoxicillin (±clavulanate) or a fluoroquinolone with clindamycin are the most commonly recommended empirical antimicrobials whilst pending bacterial culture of the pleural effusion. The aim of this study is to review and compare the pleural effusion culture and antimicrobial susceptibility results to the PROTECT ME poster and other published antimicrobial use guidelines. The medical records of 53 dogs diagnosed with pyothorax between 2014 and 2020 at two veterinary referral centres were reviewed. Information, including culture and susceptibility results, was assessed. Antimicrobial susceptibility panels varied; susceptibility to a particular antibiotic was calculated as a percentage of isolates tested against the same antibiotic. A total of 30 of 53 dogs (57.7%) had a positive pleural fluid culture. The most common isolates were Pasteurella species (23.3%), Escherichia coli (23.3%), and mixed anaerobes (20%). From the aerobic isolates, 73–83% were susceptible to a fluoroquinolone, 14/19 (74%) to amoxicillin, and 20/22 (91%) to potentiated amoxicillin. Resistance to clindamycin was documented in 9/13 (69%) aerobic isolates, with all Gram-negative bacteria (9/9) being resistant. The combination of potentiated amoxicillin with marbofloxacin would have been appropriate in most of the dogs (75–92.9%). This study shows a high rate of resistance to clindamycin, which is not a suitable option for monotherapy and may be less effective in combination therapy compared to potentiated amoxicillin. Full article
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11 pages, 751 KiB  
Article
First Isolation of Methicillin-Resistant Livestock-Associated Staphylococcus aureus CC398 and CC1 in Intensive Pig Production Farms in Argentina
by Paula Gagetti, Gabriela Isabel Giacoboni, Hernan Dario Nievas, Victorio Fabio Nievas, Fabiana Alicia Moredo and Alejandra Corso
Animals 2023, 13(11), 1796; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13111796 - 29 May 2023
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Abstract
Since the mid-2000s, livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has been identified among pigs worldwide, CC398 being the most relevant LA-MRSA clone. In the present work, nasal swabs were taken from healthy pigs of different age categories (25 to 154 days) from 2019 to [...] Read more.
Since the mid-2000s, livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) has been identified among pigs worldwide, CC398 being the most relevant LA-MRSA clone. In the present work, nasal swabs were taken from healthy pigs of different age categories (25 to 154 days) from 2019 to 2021 in four intensive farms located in three provinces of Argentina. The aim of the present study was to characterize the first LA-MRSA isolates that colonized healthy fattening pigs in Argentina in terms of their resistance phenotype and genotype and to know the circulating clones in the country. Antimicrobial susceptibility, presence of the mecA gene and PCR screening of CC398 were evaluated in all the isolates. They were resistant to cefoxitin, penicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin but susceptible to nitrofurantoin, rifampicin, vancomycin and linezolid. Furthermore, 79% were resistant to clindamycin and lincomycin, 68% to erythromycin, 58% to gentamicin and 37% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. All the isolates were multidrug resistant. The clonal relation was assessed by SmaI-PFGE (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) and a representative isolate of each PFGE type was whole genome sequenced by Illumina. MLST (multilocus sequence typing), resistance and virulence genes and SCCmec typing were performed on sequenced isolates. The isolates were differentiated in three clonal types by PFGE, and they belonged to sequence-type ST398 (58%) and ST9, CC1 (42%) by MLST. SCCmec typeV and several resistance genes detected showed complete correlation with resistance phenotypes. The present study revealed that LA-MRSA colonizing healthy pigs in Argentina belongs to CC398 and CC1, two MRSA lineages frequently associated to pigs in other countries. Full article
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