Nutritional Impact of Mycotoxins in Livestock and Poultry and Prevention Strategies

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 August 2024 | Viewed by 3212

Special Issue Editors

Institute of Quality Standards and Testing Technology for Agro-Products, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, China
Interests: emerging contaminants; identification at trace level; occurrence in feed and food; transport in food chain
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
College of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
Interests: animal nutrition; feed safety; mycotoxins; animal health; selenium
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Institute for Agro-Food Standards and Testing Technology, Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Shanghai 201403, China
Interests: food safety; mycotoxins; molecular mechanisms of toxicology; mycotoxin metabolism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The mycotoxin contamination of animal feeds is a significant issue in the livestock industry worldwide, with direct impacts on animal health and productivity. Mycotoxins not only cause mycotoxicosis in animals, but also affect animal performance by disrupting nutrient digestion, absorption, utilization, and animal physiology. Since it is challenging to prevent the development of mycotoxins, mitigation techniques are receiving more and more attention from researchers and the feed industry.

We welcome submissions of original research and review papers on this topic. Manuscripts submitted to this Special Issue must not be published previously nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere. Research themes may include, but are not limited to:

  • Adverse effects on animal nutrition and health by individual or conjoint mycotoxins;
  • Impact of mycotoxins on gut health;
  • Bio-indicators of mycotoxins in animals;
  • Adsorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of mycotoxins;
  • New application of detection approaches for the mycotoxins;
  • Novel mitigation strategies for mycotoxin contamination (i.e., nutritional approaches, adsorbents, microorganisms and/or their enzymes).

This Special Issue welcomes all experts and researchers that would like to present information in a concise, understandable, and logical format on the current state-of-the-art in the nutritional impact of mycotoxins and prevention strategies.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Ruiguo Wang
Prof. Dr. Lvhui Sun
Dr. Zhiqi Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • animal
  • poultry
  • feed
  • fungus
  • mycotoxin
  • nutritional impact
  • gut health
  • mitigation strategy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 1241 KiB  
Article
Silica–Calcite Sedimentary Rock (Opoka) Enhances the Immunological Status and Improves the Growth Rate in Broilers Exposed to Ochratoxin A in Feed
Animals 2024, 14(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14010024 (registering DOI) - 20 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Mycotoxins, such as Ochratoxin A (OTA), originating from fungi like Aspergillus and Penicillium, represent serious health hazards to poultry. The use of mycotoxin-adsorbing feed additives can reduce these risks. Opoka, a porous transitional rock, shows promise as one of these additives. This study [...] Read more.
Mycotoxins, such as Ochratoxin A (OTA), originating from fungi like Aspergillus and Penicillium, represent serious health hazards to poultry. The use of mycotoxin-adsorbing feed additives can reduce these risks. Opoka, a porous transitional rock, shows promise as one of these additives. This study is the first to examine the effect of Opoka administered with OTA on zootechnical parameters and the immune response of chickens. A 42-day investigation examined the impact of 1% of Opoka supplementation in feed on OTA-challenged broiler chickens. Seventy-two chickens were allocated into three groups of twenty-four individuals each: a control group, an OTA-exposed (2 mg/kg feed) group, and an OTA (2 mg/kg feed) plus 1% of Opoka group. Growth and blood parameters were monitored at predetermined intervals, and comprehensive biochemical, hematological, and cytometric analyses were conducted. The study showed that OTA exposure had a negative impact on chicken weight gain. However, adding Opoka to the diet improved weight gain, indicating its potential as a protective agent. Chickens fed with Opoka also had an increased white blood cell count, which suggests an improved immune response and elevated glucose and cholesterol concentrations. These findings indicate that Opoka may be useful in mitigating health complications caused by OTA exposure in broilers. Full article
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Review

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22 pages, 340 KiB  
Review
Restoring Activity of Milk Thistle (Silybum marianum L.) on Serum Biochemical Parameters, Oxidative Status, Immunity, and Performance in Poultry and Other Animal Species, Poisoned by Mycotoxins: A Review
Animals 2023, 13(3), 330; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13030330 - 17 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1940
Abstract
Grains are major farm animals’ diet ingredients, and one of the main concerns is when are mycotoxin (MyT) contaminated, compromising animals’ health, performance, and product safety. Among the natural phytocompounds that are being used to prevent MyT damage, silymarin (SIL), an extract from [...] Read more.
Grains are major farm animals’ diet ingredients, and one of the main concerns is when are mycotoxin (MyT) contaminated, compromising animals’ health, performance, and product safety. Among the natural phytocompounds that are being used to prevent MyT damage, silymarin (SIL), an extract from the seed of the milk thistle (MT) is a suitable candidate. This review aims to examine the scientific evidence concerning the anti-MyT toxicity effects of MT/SIL in poultry and livestock. In vitro and in vivo studies (n = 27) showed that MT whole plant, seed, or SIL-standardized extract had positive effects on animal health, performance, and restoring the hepatic activity, with a reduction of organ lesions caused by MyT. Furthermore, showed utility for combating MyT-immunodepression, improving intestinal health, and limiting the excretion of toxins residues in food of animal origin, although in some cases, MT/SIL supplementation does not produce appreciable effects. The use of MT in animal nutrition can be useful since the bioactive compounds, also if present in variable amounts, can help the animals to counteract the effects of MyT. The use of the phytoextract of SIL, due to its cost, can be useful if it reported the specific bioactive compounds, recognize for their pharmacological activities. Full article
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