Insecticide Resistance and Novel Insecticides

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Pest and Disease Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2024) | Viewed by 20206

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Integrated Pest Management on Crops in East China, Ministry of Agriculture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China
Interests: agricultural pest control; insecticide resistance; synthesis of novel insecticide
Hubei Insect Resources Utilization and Sustainable Pest Management Key Laboratory, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
Interests: digging novel targets or molecules for developing “green” insecticides

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the increasing human population, the state of agriculture remains severe. Insect pests still represent significant threats. Key factors limiting the control of insect pests include the development of insect resistance to insecticides and the environmental risk of insecticides. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of insect resistance and employing novel and green insecticides are critical measures for pest control. We are therefore inviting researchers focused on insect resistance and the production of novel insecticides to contribute to this Special Issue. We aim to provide a platform for researchers to share their latest cutting-edge research on insect resistance and novel insecticides.

Recent advances have taken insect resistance and novel insecticides in exciting new directions. For example, dsRNAs, small peptides, metadimide compounds (e.g. broflanilide) isoxazoline compounds (e.g., fluxametamide, isocycloseram), etc., have been or will be used for insect control in agriculture. Meanwhile, basic science studies have provided major new insights into the targets of insecticides. For example, the target of pymetrozine is the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channel, and the glycine in the third transmembrane of the RDL subunit of the GABA receptor is considered to be a potential action site of isoxazoline insecticides.

For this Special Issue, “Insecticide Resistance and Novel Insecticides,” we are seeking papers highlighting cutting-edge work in these areas, with special attention given to mechanisms of insect resistance and novel insecticide, including green chemical insecticides, dsRNA, small peptides, and so on, acting on novel or traditional targets.

Systematic reviews and experimental and original research related to insect resistance and novel insecticides are welcome. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Insecticide resistance;
  • Synthesis of insecticides;
  • Nanomaterials for insecticides;
  • RNAi;
  • Small peptides;
  • Receptors of insecticide;
  • Novel insecticide targets;
  • Biogenic insecticides.

Prof. Dr. Chunqing Zhao
Dr. Yueping He
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • insecticide
  • insect resistance
  • synthesize

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 2302 KiB  
Article
Effect of Biosynthesized Nanoselenium on Controlling Tomato Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne incognita
by Asmaa Sh. M. Daoush, Mohamed H. Hendawey, Rabaa Yaseen, Ahmed S. M. El-Nuby, Tarek M. Bedair, Khairiah Mubarak Alwutayd, Nawal Al-Hoshani, Ahmed Shaaban, Anum Bashir and Lin Li
Agronomy 2023, 13(7), 1668; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13071668 - 21 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1200
Abstract
Tomato is a globally important fruit crop, which is easily susceptible to infection by plant-parasitic nematodes during growth. In this study, selenium nanoparticles were biosynthesized through the selenite reduction pathway in a wild-type Pseudomonas stutzeri BB19 and were characterized by uniform nanostructured needle-like [...] Read more.
Tomato is a globally important fruit crop, which is easily susceptible to infection by plant-parasitic nematodes during growth. In this study, selenium nanoparticles were biosynthesized through the selenite reduction pathway in a wild-type Pseudomonas stutzeri BB19 and were characterized by uniform nanostructured needle-like forms with an average size of 95.2 nm. The nematicidal effect of biosynthesized selenium nanoparticles (BioSeNPs) at different concentrations (2, 6, and 10 ppm) during the pre- or post-infection of tomato root-knot nematode (RKN), Meloidogyne incognita, was assessed under greenhouse conditions. The BioSeNPs were applied as a foliar spray or a soil drench, compared to ethoprophos nematicide (100 mL/pot). The results showed that the ethoprophos nematicide significantly reduced the number of galls, egg mass, and eggs/egg mass of M. incognita by 94.2, 92.8, and 49.8%, respectively. BioSeNPs, as foliar sprays, significantly reduced the number of galls in post-treated infected tomato plants at 10 ppm and in pre-treated infected tomato plants at 2 ppm by 91.9 and 91.4%, respectively. Concerning the egg mass, BioSeNPs significantly reduced it in pre-treated infected tomato plants at 2 ppm as a foliar spray by 90.9%. Moreover, BioSeNPs significantly reduced the eggs/egg mass in pre-treated infected tomato plants at 2 ppm as a soil drench by 43.3%. On the other hand, the BioSeNPs considerably improved tomato growth, chlorophyll a and b, carotenoid content, and enzymes (i.e., catalase and peroxidase) activity compared to untreated infected tomato plants (negative control). Hence, the BioSeNPs show a significant application potential as a cost-effective and environmentally friendly biocontrol agent for RKN management in tomato plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insecticide Resistance and Novel Insecticides)
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14 pages, 5237 KiB  
Article
Untargeted UHPLC-MS Metabolomics Reveals the Metabolic Perturbations of Helicoverpa armigera under the Stress of Novel Insect Growth Regulator ZQ-8
by Caiyue Liu, Lin Yang, Fuqiang Jin, Yuelan Yin, Zizheng Xie, Longfei Yang, Sifeng Zhao, Guoqiang Zhang, Desong Yang and Xiaoqiang Han
Agronomy 2023, 13(5), 1315; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13051315 - 8 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1650
Abstract
According to the previous research of our group, we found compound ZQ-8 ((1S,2R,4S)-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo [2.2.1]heptan-2-yl-4-(tert-butyl)benzoate). This compound showed a strong growth inhibitory effect on Helicoverpa armigera by inhibiting chitinase 2 and endochitinase. To further understand the mechanism of [...] Read more.
According to the previous research of our group, we found compound ZQ-8 ((1S,2R,4S)-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo [2.2.1]heptan-2-yl-4-(tert-butyl)benzoate). This compound showed a strong growth inhibitory effect on Helicoverpa armigera by inhibiting chitinase 2 and endochitinase. To further understand the mechanism of ZQ-8 interfering with the growth and development of H. armigera, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) was utilized to analyze the metabolomics of the epidermis and viscera of H. armigera after ZQ-8 stress. The results revealed that the content of most metabolites was down-regulated after ZQ-8 treatment. Through the analysis of metabolic pathways, it was found that ZQ -8 mainly interfered with energy metabolism and amino acid biosynthesis pathways, which may be one of the important factors in which ZQ-8 caused the death of H. armigera larvae. Furthermore, ZQ-8 not only inhibits chitin degradation but also inhibits chitin synthesis in vivo. These findings provide new insights into a better understanding of the mechanism of action of ZQ-8. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insecticide Resistance and Novel Insecticides)
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9 pages, 3449 KiB  
Communication
Rapid Detection of A282S Mutation in the RDL1 Gene of Rice Stem Borer via the Mutation-Specific LAMP Technique
by Zijiao Song, Sugui Zhang, Wentao Man, Yao Li, Guanghua Luo, Jinyao Yu, Yilan Fu, Junxi Yao, Yiqu Chen and Chunqing Zhao
Agronomy 2023, 13(2), 601; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13020601 - 20 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1570
Abstract
Rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker) is one of the most serious pests on rice and is distributed worldwide. With the long-term and continuous usage of insecticides, C. suppressalis has developed high levels of resistance to various kinds of insecticides, including phenylpyrazole insecticides. [...] Read more.
Rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker) is one of the most serious pests on rice and is distributed worldwide. With the long-term and continuous usage of insecticides, C. suppressalis has developed high levels of resistance to various kinds of insecticides, including phenylpyrazole insecticides. As is well known, the resistance of C. suppressalis to phenylpyrazole insecticides is determined by the A282S mutation of the GABA receptor RDL subunit. In order to efficiently detect the resistance of C. suppressalis, a rapid and sensitive loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique was established and optimized in this study. The optimal concentration of components was Bst DNA polymerase (0.24 U/μL), dNTP (0.8 mM), Mg2+ (4 mM), betaine (0.6 M), forward inner primer and backward inner primer (1.6 μM), F3 and B3 (0.4 μM), and hydroxyl naphthol blue (150 mM), respectively, and the optimal reaction condition was 63 °C for 60 min, which could reduce the cost and time of detection. In addition, the accuracy of the optimized LAMP reaction system and parameters was verified in the field strains of C. suppressalis from different regions, including Jiangsu, Jiangxi, and Hu’nan provinces. The mutation (A2’S) was successfully detected in the field strains. As far as we know, this is the first report of the LAMP technique applied in the resistance monitoring of C. suppressalis to phenylpyrazole insecticides. According to our results, the optimized LAMP reaction system is feasible and easy to operate and to efficiently detect resistance-related mutation in a short time, as directly judged by the naked eye. Our results provide a new tool for detection of resistance of C. suppressalis, which is a very useful tool for comprehensive management of C. suppressalis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insecticide Resistance and Novel Insecticides)
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23 pages, 3973 KiB  
Article
Antifeeding, Toxic, and Growth-Reducing Activity of trans-Anethole and S-(+)-Carvone against Larvae of the Gypsy Moth Lymantria dispar (L.)
by Igor Kostić, Slobodan Milanović, Miroslav Kostić, Darka Šešlija Jovanović, Dušica Ćalić, Libor Jankovský and Jelica Lazarević
Agronomy 2022, 12(12), 3049; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12123049 - 1 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1971
Abstract
Botanicals, such as essential oils (EO) and their compounds, are considered a viable eco-friendly alternative to synthetic insecticides, which threaten human health and ecosystem functioning. In the present study, we explored the potential use of two EO compounds, trans-anethole (phenylpropanoid) and S [...] Read more.
Botanicals, such as essential oils (EO) and their compounds, are considered a viable eco-friendly alternative to synthetic insecticides, which threaten human health and ecosystem functioning. In the present study, we explored the potential use of two EO compounds, trans-anethole (phenylpropanoid) and S-(+)-carvone (monoterpene ketone), against gypsy moth larvae (GML), a serious pest of deciduous forests and orchards. GML feeding, survival, molting, and nutritional physiology were assessed at different compound concentrations and compared with the effects of the commercial botanical product NeemAzal®-T/S (neem). The impact of botanicals on GML feeding was assessed by the leaf-dipping method and showed the highest antifeeding activity of neem in the no-choice assay. GML that were offered a choice were deterred by anethole and attracted by low concentrations of carvone and neem. Ingestion of botanicals was more effective in inducing mortality and reducing molting than residual contact exposure. Anethole and carvone were better toxicants but worse growth regulators than neem. Assessing nutritional indices revealed reduced growth, consumption, and food utilization in larvae fed on botanical-supplemented diets. The highest metabolic cost of food processing was recorded in carvone-fed larvae, which exhibited a negative growth rate. The results suggest that anethole and carvone might be used as control agents against GML. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insecticide Resistance and Novel Insecticides)
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12 pages, 302 KiB  
Article
Field Evolution of Insecticide Resistance against Sogatella furcifera (Horváth) in Central China, 2011–2021
by Rong Huang, Haoran Meng, Hu Wan, Junkai Li and Xiaolei Zhang
Agronomy 2022, 12(10), 2588; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12102588 - 21 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1627
Abstract
The white-backed planthopper Sogatella furcifera (Horváth) is an important pest on rice plants throughout Asia. The application of chemical insecticides is still the main approach to suppressing the field population of S. furcifera. However, misuse of chemical insecticides has promoted the development [...] Read more.
The white-backed planthopper Sogatella furcifera (Horváth) is an important pest on rice plants throughout Asia. The application of chemical insecticides is still the main approach to suppressing the field population of S. furcifera. However, misuse of chemical insecticides has promoted the development of insecticide resistance in this insect pest. Thus, in the present study, dose responses of 58 field populations of S. furcifera to 7 insecticides were analyzed by rice-stem dipping from 2011 to 2021 in Central China. The results indicated that field populations of S. furcifera showed moderate levels of resistance to nitenpyram (RR = 1.7–17.8-fold), thiamethoxam (RR = 1.4–25.8-fold), dinotefuran (RR = 1.5–25.3-fold), clothianidin (RR = 2.1–12.5-fold), chlorpyrifos (RR = 1.1–56.6-fold), etofenprox (RR = 1.1–14.8-fold) and isoprocarb (RR = 1.4–11.5-fold). The results presented here will be beneficial to improve our ability to identify and predict insecticide resistance, make better control recommendations and prevent further insecticide resistance development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insecticide Resistance and Novel Insecticides)
13 pages, 929 KiB  
Article
Discovery of Novel N-Pyridylpyrazole Thiazole Derivatives as Insecticide Leads
by Shuai Yang, Hongxiang Peng, Jiahong Tang, Shuting Fan, Chen Zhao, Hanhong Xu and Guangkai Yao
Agronomy 2022, 12(10), 2472; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12102472 - 11 Oct 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2117
Abstract
To develop effective insecticides against Lepidoptera pests, 25 novel N-pyridylpyrazole derivatives containing thiazole moiety were designed and synthesized based on the intermediate derivatization method (IDM). The insecticidal activities of these target compounds against Plutella xylostella (P. xylostella), Spodoptera exigua ( [...] Read more.
To develop effective insecticides against Lepidoptera pests, 25 novel N-pyridylpyrazole derivatives containing thiazole moiety were designed and synthesized based on the intermediate derivatization method (IDM). The insecticidal activities of these target compounds against Plutella xylostella (P. xylostella), Spodoptera exigua (S. exigua), and Spodoptera frugiperda (S. frugiperda) were evaluated. Bioassays indicated that compound 7g−7j exhibited good insecticidal activities. Compound 7g showed especially excellent insecticidal activities against P. xylostella, S. exigua, and S. frugiperda with LC50 values of 5.32 mg/L, 6.75 mg/L, and 7.64 mg/L, respectively, which were adequate for that of commercial insecticide indoxacarb. A preliminary structure-activity relationship analysis showed that the insecticidal activities of thiazole amides were better than that of thiazole esters, and the amides with electron-withdrawing groups on the benzene ring were better than the ones with electron-donating groups. This work provides important information for designing novel N-pyridylpyrazole thiazole candidate compounds and suggests that the 7g is a promising insecticide lead for further studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insecticide Resistance and Novel Insecticides)
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11 pages, 687 KiB  
Article
Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Fluxametamide on Rice-Boring Pest, Rice Stem Borer Chilo suppressalis
by Yao Li, Yingnan Wang, Chenglong Qian, Tao Tang, Ning Shen, Wei Wu, Jianming Wang, Zhaojun Han and Chunqing Zhao
Agronomy 2022, 12(10), 2429; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12102429 - 7 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2310
Abstract
(1) Background: Fluxametamide is a novel isoxazoline insecticide. Rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker) is a destructive Lepidoptera pest of rice in China, and novel effective insecticides are required to be developed for controlling it due to its increasing resistance levels. (2) Results: [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Fluxametamide is a novel isoxazoline insecticide. Rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker) is a destructive Lepidoptera pest of rice in China, and novel effective insecticides are required to be developed for controlling it due to its increasing resistance levels. (2) Results: In the lethal assay, the insecticidal activity of fluxametamide with median lethal dose (LD50) value of 1.308 mg/kg to the fourth-instar larvae of C. suppressalis was higher than that of chlorantraniliprole (LD50, 3.112 mg/kg) and lower than that of emamectin benzoate (LD50, 0.006 mg/kg). In the sublethal (LD10 and LD30) assay, the duration of third to sixth-instar larvae, the pupal duration, pupation rate, and life cycle rate were significantly increased in F0 generation. Both the length and weight of the ovarian tube were decreased with the dose increase of fluxametamide, and were significantly smaller in the LD30 treatment than those of the control group. In F1 generation, only the duration of eggs was significantly increased with LD30 treatment of fluxametamide, whereas other developmental parameters had no significant change. (3) Conclusion: Fluxametamide had relatively strong lethal and sublethal effects on C. suppressalis and probably was able to affect the population growth and progeny of C. suppressalis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insecticide Resistance and Novel Insecticides)
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13 pages, 1097 KiB  
Article
Thifluzamide, Fludioxonil, and Clothianidin as Seed Treatment Can Efficiently Control Major Soil-Borne Diseases, Aphids (Aphidoidea spp.), and Residue Distribution in the Field
by Chao Chen, Xumiao Wang, Shanshan Yin, Chao Wang, Xuexiang Ren, Quan Gao and Haiqun Cao
Agronomy 2022, 12(10), 2330; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12102330 - 27 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2043
Abstract
Combined seed treatment with neonicotinoids and fungicides offers a potential control measure for pest management at the wheat seeding stage. In this study, a novel, highly-efficient seed-coating agent was prepared using thifluzamide, fludioxonil, and clothianidin as its active components and other additives (abbreviated [...] Read more.
Combined seed treatment with neonicotinoids and fungicides offers a potential control measure for pest management at the wheat seeding stage. In this study, a novel, highly-efficient seed-coating agent was prepared using thifluzamide, fludioxonil, and clothianidin as its active components and other additives (abbreviated to TFC). Laboratory experiments and field trials revealed a positive effect on germination, plant height, and root length, with 90% control efficiency on wheat sharp eyespots and aphid infestations. Meanwhile, the distribution of thifluzamide, fludioxonil, and clothianidin residues in the wheat plants at harvest was below 0.05 mg/kg both at the recommended dosage and at 2.0 times the recommended dose. Furthermore, an artificial soil assay of biotoxicity in earthworms revealed a low level of toxicity at LC50 > 10 mg/kg. Overall, these findings suggest that TFC has the potential to control major soil-borne diseases and pest infestations in wheat, offering an environmentally-friendly alternative to more toxic pesticides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insecticide Resistance and Novel Insecticides)
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Review

Jump to: Research

15 pages, 774 KiB  
Review
The dsRNA Delivery, Targeting and Application in Pest Control
by Yuzhen Lu, Xinyue Deng, Qijun Zhu, Denghui Wu, Jielai Zhong, Liang Wen and Xiaoqiang Yu
Agronomy 2023, 13(3), 714; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13030714 - 27 Feb 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3820
Abstract
RNA interference (RNAi) is a simple and rapid method for silencing genes in various organisms, and it is widely used in gene function and genetics research. RNAi has been developed as a novel pest management strategy. Double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) delivered via microinjection, ingestion, [...] Read more.
RNA interference (RNAi) is a simple and rapid method for silencing genes in various organisms, and it is widely used in gene function and genetics research. RNAi has been developed as a novel pest management strategy. Double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) delivered via microinjection, ingestion, or soaking are effective for silencing genes in insect pests, whereas oral and topical delivery methods are feasible for field applications. Here, we summarize oral and topical delivery, in pests, of dsRNA target genes, including those involved in energy metabolism, synthesis of essential cellular components, hormone homeostasis, chitin metabolism, the digestive system, immunity, detoxification, insecticide resistance, and other processes. RNAi pesticides have been developed in the form of genetically modified (GM) crops expressing dsRNAs as well as applied as foliar sprays. In this review, RNAi-based products are also summarized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insecticide Resistance and Novel Insecticides)
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