Research Progress of Mineral Elements in Cropping Systems

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Farming Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 3873

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Department of Chemical, Pharmaceutical Agricultural Science (DOCPAS), University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara, Italy
Interests: environmental science; agricultural and soil sciences; agricultural chemistry; biogeochemistry of trace elements
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Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-Food and Forest Systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Via San Camillo de Lellis snc, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
Interests: environmental science; agricultural and soil sciences; plant's responses to abiotic stresses; bioavailability and bioaccessibility of trace elements
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Nutrient uptake is a basic requirement for plant biomass production. Well-balanced nutrient availability in the soil is critical for plant physiology and development. The amount and composition of available nutrients, and plants’ uptake of these nutrients, vary by soil physical, chemical, and biological components. Anthropogenic processes in agroecosystems are often responsible for soil nutrients, due to the agronomic techniques and applied inputs (fertilizers, pesticides, organic manures, etc.).

In addition to the macronutrients, different trace elements (Mn, Fe, B, etc.) are micronutrients essential to plant growth. In high concentrations, some of these elements (e.g., As) are toxic to living organisms, and are often considered as contaminants. The anthropic inputs and activities and the agronomic techniques applied on farms can determine the increasing levels of trace element contamination in the soil. However, trace elements can also be naturally present in agricultural soil due to their parent materials.

This Special Issue focuses on the following aspects:

  1. The behavior of mineral elements in plant–soil systems, chemical processes involved in the transformation, and processes controlling the bioavailability and mobility of trace elements in soils;
  2. The uptake, translocation, and transformation of nutrients in crop plant–soil–microbe systems;
  3. The bioavailability, phytoavailability, bioaccessibility, and risk assessment of essential and non-essential elements in agri-food and soil;
  4. Focus on the balance of nutrients in agroecosystems;
  5. Biotechnology and nanotechnology to regulate nutrient behavior in plant–soil systems;
  6. New technology for characterizing the chemical forms and bioavailability of nutrients in agricultural soils and plants;
  7. Soil and plant nutrients as affected by climate change;
  8. The contribution of agronomic techniques and anthropogenic activities to soil and plant nutrient contents.

Prof. Dr. Silvia Rita Stazi
Prof. Dr. Roberto Mancinelli
Dr. Rosita Marabottini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • bioavailability
  • phytoavailability
  • bioaccessibility
  • balance of nutrients
  • agronomic techniques

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 1541 KiB  
Article
Boron Effects on Fruit Set, Yield, Quality and Paternity of Macadamia
by Anushika L. De Silva, Wiebke Kämper, Helen M. Wallace, Steven M. Ogbourne, Shahla Hosseini Bai, Joel Nichols and Stephen J. Trueman
Agronomy 2022, 12(3), 684; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12030684 - 11 Mar 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3182
Abstract
Many tree crops experience sub-optimal yields and low fruit quality due to inadequate pollination, low fruit set, and poor crop nutrition. Boron (B) is a critical crop nutrient for fruit set because B levels affect pollen germination and pollen tube growth. However, the [...] Read more.
Many tree crops experience sub-optimal yields and low fruit quality due to inadequate pollination, low fruit set, and poor crop nutrition. Boron (B) is a critical crop nutrient for fruit set because B levels affect pollen germination and pollen tube growth. However, the relationship between floral B concentration and fruit set is not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of B applications on the initial fruit set, yield, quality, and paternity of macadamia (Macadamia integrifolia). Cultivar ‘816’ trees received one of three treatments: (a) 0 g, (b) 15 g, or (c) 30 g B per tree prior to flowering. Boron application increased the B concentration of macadamia flowers. Application of 15 g B increased fruit set at 3 weeks after peak anthesis, but this higher initial fruit set was not translated into higher fruit set at 6 or 10 weeks after peak anthesis or higher yield. Boron application increased B concentrations in kernels but did not affect nut-in-shell (NIS) mass, kernel mass, kernel recovery, kernel oil concentration or incidence of whole kernels. Cultivar ‘816’ was highly outcrossing, with 97–98% cross-paternity among kernels from all treatments. Our results indicate that higher B concentration in macadamia flowers can be associated with an increased initial fruit set. However, high B levels did not affect yield, nut quality, or the proportion of self-pollinated fruit at maturity. The heavy dependence on outcrossing highlights the importance of inter-planting different cultivars and managing bee hives to sustain the productivity of macadamia orchards. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Progress of Mineral Elements in Cropping Systems)
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