Special Issue "Genetic Potentials and Breeding Progress in Cereal Grains"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Crop Breeding and Genetics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2024 | Viewed by 774

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Leonardo A. Crespo-Herrera
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Texcoco 56130, Mexico
Interests: wheat breeding; genotype-by-environment interaction; wheat genetics; insect resistance; disease resistance; genomics
Dr. Ravi Prakash Singh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Texcoco 56130, Mexico
Interests: wheat breeding; disease resistance; wheat genetics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Global cereal production is around 2.7 billion tonnes, of which around 90% is accounted for by maize, wheat and rice. By 2030, the global use of cereal is projected to be 3 billion tonnes, of which around 90% of the increase is expected to occur in developing economies. At the same time, climate change is predicted to reduce yields in several cereal production regions.

In light of the increase in food demand, genetics and breeding play a significant role in increasing cereal productivity and contributing to the resilience of those agri-food systems in a changing climate. With the advent of new technologies, it is possible to intervene in plant breeding schemes to significantly accelerate the rate of genetic gain and develop elite germplasm with the adequate combination of traits for the environments in which new varieties will be grown.

In this Special Issue, we encourage the submission of papers related to:

  • The application of new technologies and methods to advance cereal breeding, including, but not limited to genomic prediction, marker-assisted selection, environomics, high-throughput phenotyping, speed breeding, gene editing, etc.
  • The estimation of genetic gains in cereals for yield potential and climate resilience.
  • Genetic studies of traits relevant to cereal production and food security, including, but not limited to genome-wide association studies and linkage mapping experiments.

New methodologies and strategies that have the potential to increase genetic gain.

Dr. Leonardo A. Crespo-Herrera
Dr. Ravi Prakash Singh
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • genomics
  • genetic studies
  • genetic gains

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

19 pages, 2244 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Potential of Old and Modern Serbian Wheat Genotypes: Yield Components and Nutritional Profiles in a Comprehensive Study
Agronomy 2023, 13(9), 2426; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13092426 - 20 Sep 2023
Viewed by 530
Abstract
Creating wheat genotypes characterized by high grain yield, high protein content, and favorable amino acid composition is the main goal of breeders, especially in developing countries where wheat is a staple food. An experiment with 20 wheat genotypes, released through breeding activities in [...] Read more.
Creating wheat genotypes characterized by high grain yield, high protein content, and favorable amino acid composition is the main goal of breeders, especially in developing countries where wheat is a staple food. An experiment with 20 wheat genotypes, released through breeding activities in the Serbian region at different periods and adapted to its pedoclimatic conditions, was conducted with the aim of determining the genetic potential of the analyzed genotypes for grain yield and quality. Due to the divergence of the examined wheat germplasm, the factor of genotype had the largest share in the variation of all yield parameters (>66%). The genotypes Zadruga and Agrounija exhibited superior abilities for overall grain yield. Also, genotype Zadruga stood out in a distinct cluster group due to high values of both thousand grain weight and grain yield per plant. A continuous improvement in protein content was found, with newer genotypes having 17.13% higher protein content compared with older genotypes. Genotype Sloga stood out with the highest protein content (13.93%). On the other hand, the old genotype Balkan was distinguished by the highest content of nonessential amino acids (61.5 g 100 g−1 protein), which makes it a good genetic resource. Genotypes Agrounija (32.62 g 100 g−1 protein) and Tanjugovka (32.47 g 100 g−1 protein) had the highest content of essential amino acids. The highest AAS value was established for tryptophan (1.81) and the lowest for lysine (0.61). Genotypes Tanjugovka and Zadruga had the highest AAS, i.e., protein completeness. The genotypes Zadruga, Tanjugovka, Agrounija, and Sloga have demonstrated high-yield capacity and possess a favorable amino acid profile, making them promising candidates for enhancing the nutritional quality of wheat and potentially benefiting human health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetic Potentials and Breeding Progress in Cereal Grains)
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