Functional and Nutritional Properties of Agricultural Products

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Biosystem and Biological Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 6526

Special Issue Editor

Laboratory of Functional Food, Food and Nutrition Graduate Program, Federal University of State of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro 22290-250, Brazil
Interests: bioactive compounds; functional foods; food development; carotenoids; phenolic compounds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Agricultural products are the basis of nutrition and support the normal metabolism against different pathologies. The nutritional value and functional properties of agricultural products are mainly related to foods rich in active ingredients that contribute to maintaining good health. The nutritional properties and the active principles obtained from agricultural products can play an important role in the body by performing various health and metabolic functions. 

This Special Issue encourages the submission of high-quality research articles and reviews covering recent advances in the nutritional and functional characterization of agricultural products and derived compounds used in healthy foods. 

Potential topics for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Production of agricultural foods with high nutritional and functional potential;
  • Influence of processing technologies on nutritional and functional properties of agricultural foods;
  • Bioactive compounds with functional roles derived from agricultural products;
  • Extraction, identification, and quantification techniques for bioactive compounds derived from agricultural products;
  • Methods for supplementing foods with bio-compounds derived from agricultural products;
  • Relationship between the bioactive compounds of agricultural products and health.

Prof. Dr. Anderson Junger Teodoro
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioactive compounds
  • food technology
  • functional foods

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 303 KiB  
Article
Phytosterol and Polyphenol Contents and Quinoa Leave Yields Variation in Relationships to Variety, Density and Harvesting Date
Agronomy 2022, 12(10), 2397; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12102397 - 03 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1393
Abstract
Quinoa is an Andean grain known for its gluten-free grains, which are used as a functional food. The aim of this research was to study the possibility of introducing quinoa as a vegetable crop grown for young leaves as a source of polyphenols [...] Read more.
Quinoa is an Andean grain known for its gluten-free grains, which are used as a functional food. The aim of this research was to study the possibility of introducing quinoa as a vegetable crop grown for young leaves as a source of polyphenols and phytosterols. To achieve this goal, a field experiment was performed with three quinoa cultivars (Titicaca, Puno, and Vikinga) grown in a split plot design. The experimental factors included three densities (160, 320, and 760 plants·m−2) and two harvest dates (52 and 62 days after sowing (DAS)). The content of phytosterols (ergosterol, stigmasterol, β-sitosterol and campesterol) and polyphenols (ferulic acid, isoquercitrin and rutozid) in quinoa leaves were determined by HPLC method. The phytosterol content varied within the limits: ergosterol 0–7.62 µg·100 g−1 dw, stigmasterol 79.9–175.3 µg·100 g−1 dw, β-sitosterol 425.7–623.1 µg·100 g−1 dw and campesterol 0–5.25 µg·100 g−1 dw. Ferulic acid varied greatly from 38.0 to 63.3 µg·g−1 dw, isoquercitrin ranged from 63 to 101.6 µg·g−1 dw and rutozid varied widely from 32.9 to 162.8 µg·g−1 dw. The total phytosterols and the total phenolic compounds decreased with decreasing plant number density and DAS. This research demonstrated that young quinoa leaves are a good source of phytosterols and phenolics for human consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional and Nutritional Properties of Agricultural Products)
20 pages, 4474 KiB  
Article
An Evaluation of the Dough Rheology and Bread Quality of Replacement Wheat Flour with Different Quinoa Particle Sizes
Agronomy 2022, 12(10), 2271; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12102271 - 22 Sep 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1653
Abstract
A way to improve the nutritional value of refined wheat flour with enhanced dough rheology is by substituting wheat flour with quinoa flour (QF) at different addition levels and particle sizes (PS). Experimental variation prediction of the flour α-amylase activity, dough rheological properties, [...] Read more.
A way to improve the nutritional value of refined wheat flour with enhanced dough rheology is by substituting wheat flour with quinoa flour (QF) at different addition levels and particle sizes (PS). Experimental variation prediction of the flour α-amylase activity, dough rheological properties, and bread characteristics were estimated using mathematical models. A decrease in the falling number index, water absorption, speed of protein weakening, gas retention coefficient in the dough, maximum creep-recovery compliance, and bread volume and firmness was achieved with the increase of PS. When the QF addition level rose, the values of the following parameters decreased: dough stability, starch retrogradation, dough extensibility and deformation energy, viscosity factor, maximum gelatinization temperature, creep-recovery compliance, and bread quality parameters. Dough rheological properties are important for showing the behavior during processing, which impacts the bread quality. For each quinoa flour PS has identified the optimal addition level in wheat flour for improving bread quality. The best composite flours, regarding dough rheology and bread characteristics, contain 9.13% for large, 10.57% for medium, and 10.25% for small PS. These results may help to improve the quality of refined wheat bread or to range diversify the bread making products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional and Nutritional Properties of Agricultural Products)
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15 pages, 2993 KiB  
Article
Effect of Heat Treatment on Nutritional and Chromatic Properties of Mung Bean (Vigna radiata L.)
Agronomy 2022, 12(6), 1365; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12061365 - 05 Jun 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3082
Abstract
Chlorophyll is the primary source of color in widespread green plants. It has been investigated in mung bean seed coats and cotyledons. This study aimed to examine chromatic changes in mung beans during heat processing. It observed pigment variation within the cotyledons and [...] Read more.
Chlorophyll is the primary source of color in widespread green plants. It has been investigated in mung bean seed coats and cotyledons. This study aimed to examine chromatic changes in mung beans during heat processing. It observed pigment variation within the cotyledons and seed coats of mung beans. Following thermal treatment from 0 to 50 min, the color of mung bean products changed, primarily from a decrease in chlorophyll content in the seed coat (from 6.57 to 1.28 mg/100 g, with significant differences. p < 0.05), accompanied by the formation of tawny pheophytin. However, the b value of mung bean seed coat showed an increasing trend with significant differences (yellowness, 21.55 increasing to 34.85, p < 0.05). Interestingly, the total flavonoid content in the seed coat tended to increase with thermal time (2.93 to 18.74 µg/mg) with statistical differences (p < 0.05). The condensation reaction of flavonoids with other polyphenolic compounds formed dark-brown polymers, resulting in a significant decrease in brightness (L value) of the cooking solution with thermal processing time (p < 0.05). Thus, the chlorophyll extraction and purification of the mung bean seed coat confirmed the morphological change of chlorophyll combined with the Maillard reaction, resulting in the color change after thermal treatment. It showed that a significant reason for the discoloration of mung beans was pheophytin from chlorophyll in the processing process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional and Nutritional Properties of Agricultural Products)
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